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Full text of "Antioch News 02/04/2000"

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FP^[_??i?i???„T:.??_i!?? e _ s „ FEBRUARY 4-10, 2000 A lakeland Newspaper /75 



cents 



AUGS students 




Operation Snowflake 



By MICHAEL H. BABICZ 
Community Editor 

Winter brings snowflakes. Lots 
of them. 

One special Operation 
Snowflake brings smiles instead of 
frowns to*parents and children 
alike. 

This Operation Snowflake is 
expected to take Antioch Upper 
Grade School (AUGS) by storm. 

Snowflake is an all day non-stop 
fun event. There will be small 
groups and large groups, "tons" of 
games and more pizza than any 



junior high student can eat. Candy, 
music, laughter and craziness are all 
expected to be included. 

Another positive for the seventh 
and eighth graders is that they. are 
given permission to call teachers 
"by their first names!" 

Some high school students will 
serve as leaders in the small groups. 

Snowflake' will take place at 
Lake Hastings YMCA Camp on the 
"Hastings Site" from 8 a.m.-5 p.m. 
Monday, Feb. 21. This will be a 
teacher institute day so school will , 
not be in session. Students will be 
required to arrange their own 



transportation to and from the 
event, because buses will not be 
operating. 

Registration forms were handed 
out to students. If additional ones 
are needed, they should stop at Mrs. 
Lind's office. 

Cost is $15. Students in need of 
financial assistance are encouraged 
to have a parent or guardian contact 
Mrs. Lind at 838-8333. Several 
community businesses have donat- 
ed scholarships. 

The fee includes all of the day's 
activities, . a t-shirt, lunch and 
"wonderful memories," 



The AUGS Snowflake mission 
statement is: "A prevention (not 
intervention) program which seeks 
to improve students', decision 
making skills by emphasizing each 
person's uniqueness through small 
and large group activities." 

A desired outcome is to utilize 
positive peer pressure among 
snowflake attendees which will 
spread to the rest of the student 
community.. 

The general idea of the day is to 
encourage healthy choices which 
students are already making to keep 
them on the right track. Students 



are expected to .see what a fun and 
exciting time they can have without 
drugs or alcohol. 

According to AUGS officials, the 
focus this year is going to be accept- 
ing each other's differences, which 
includes stopping the teasing, 
harassment, bullying and other 
negative interactions youth 
sometimes have with each other: 
These are big issues among middle 
school age students. 

The final 45 minutes of the day, 
from 4:15 : 5 p.m., parents are 
encouraged to join in for a student- 
parent game show. 






Two positions open 
on St. Peter's board 

Election held the end of April 



By MICHAEL H. BABICZ 
Community Editor 



Two positions on 4 SL Peter's 
School Board of Education will be 
available in April. 

As of April 30, Jim Murray and 
Juliannc Thain will have completed 
their terms. 

As a result, a vote will be taken 
among SL Peter's School parents and 
parishioners at the Antioch church. 

Terms are for a period of three 
years with individual members 
allowed to serve a maximum of two 
elected terms. 

The election will be held the 
weekend of April 29 after the masses. 

All adult parishioners or parents 
of St. Peter's School children are 
eligible to vote. Parish rolls will be 
used to determine voter eligibility. In 
the event of a tie, a runoff election 
will be. held on the following Sunday. 

Ballots will, be available in Fr. 
Frawley Hall after each mass. Absen- 
tee ballots will be available in the 
school office. 

Prospective members must 
qualify according to the school board 
requirements: reside in the commu- 
nity for at least six months; be a 
parish member or parent of a St. 



Peter's School child; and be at least 
18-years-old. No person employed 
by the .school may serve on the 
board. *'" 

Candidates for board member- 
ship must submit their application- 
petition, signed by a minimum of 10 
parishioners or parents of St. Peter's 
School children, to. the principal no 
later than 3 p.m. Tuesday, March 7^ 

Application-petitions are avail- 
able, at the school office during 
school hours. Names will appear on 
the ballot in the order the petitions 
arc filed. 

Announcement of qualifying 
candidates will -be made during the 
March 9 regular school board 
meeting. 

The St. Peter School Board 
serves the parish, the school and the 
administration strictly as an advisory 
group. It is a function of the board to 
provide advice, encouragement, 
support and cooperation in all areas 
of school life. 

Currently serving on the board 
are Julianne Thain, president; Pat 
O'Connell, vice president; Joanne 
Adams, secretary; and board 
members Don Oelerich, Laura 
Conley, Jim Murray and Jim Orticel- 
li. 





X Games 



22-year-old Kent Ipsen competing in professional snocross 



By MICHAEL H. BABICZ 
Community Editor - 



Republicans to host 
candidates night 



By MICHAEL H. BABICZ 
Community Editor 



It is time to meet the candidates. 

The Antioch Township Republi- 
can Club will be hosting its "Meet 
Your Candidates Night" at 7:30 p.m. 
Wednesday, Feb. 16 at the Regency 
Best Western Motel on Rte. 173 in 
Antioch. 

The public is invited to attend 
this opportunity to meet local and 
county Republican candidates prior 
to the upcoming March 21 primary 
election. 



Len Mattson, Antioch Township 
Republican Club president, 
explained the format is informal, yet 
informative, allowing the public an 
opportunity to visit with the candi- 
dates on virtually a one-on-one level. 

No formal presentations or 
speeches are planned. 

"This is an ideal opportunity to 
meet your elected officials and 
discuss issues of importance to you, 
the voters," Mattson emphasized. 

Questions regarding the 
evening's program can be directed to 
Mattson at 838-0725. 



Ready to soar. , 
Antioch native Kent Ipsen will 
be competing in die X Games • 
snocross portion on Friday, Feb. 4 at 
ML Snow, VL 

Snocross is part of the Olympic- 
style format Winter X Games being 
held Feb. 2-6. ESPN, ESPN-2 and 
ABC will be broadcasting various 
portions of the event. 

The 2000 Winter X Games 
marks the 22-year-old's second 
competition in the invitation-only 
event. 

In 1999, Ipsen placed 11th out 
of 32 competitors as the only semi- 
pro to be invited to Crested Butte, 
Colo. 

For the 1998-99 season on the 
World Snowmobile Association 
(WSA) circuit, Ipsen placed first in 
the national series 440 semi-pro 
snocross and open semi-pro 
snocross divisions. The classes are 
divided according to the size of uSe 
engine in the snowmobile. 

In the 600 class, Ipsen placed 
third in the pro snocross regional 
series and fourth in the semi-pro 
snocross national series. 

"It's a dream he's always 
wanted to do," said Ellyn Ipsen, 
Kent's mother, who with husband, 
Brad, will be in Vermont to cheer 
their son on. 

"I'm glad he's been given the 
opportunity to do It," Ellyn Ipsen 
said. "I watched him at Crandon, 
and I'd much prefer to get a phone 
call on Sunday to tell me how he 
did. It's kind of nerve-racking. It 
makes me nervous, but it's still fun 
to watch." 

The reaction of people witiiln 
(lie Antioch community has been 
equally positive. "It's fun to be 
watching something on television 
and actually know someone who is 




Antioch native Kent Ipsen, shown here in snocross racing action, 
will be competing If) the Snowmobile Association's Snocross 
championships in Vermont Feb. 4. This is his second year at the 
event, placing 11th out of 32 competitors last year.— Photo 
submitted 



competing," Ellyn Ipsen admits. 

Kent Ipsen was bom and raised 
in Antioch, having graduated from 
SL Peter's Grade School in 1990 and 
Antioch Community High School 
(ACHS) in 1994. He is pursuing a 
degree in business at the College of 
Lake County in Grayslake. 

During the off season, Kent 
Ipsen works as an apprentice 



electrician for Divane Brothers in 
Franklin Park, a heavy duty electri- 
cal contractor. 

Goodwin Performance of Zion 
is Kent Ipsen's winter season 
employer. With the assistance of 
Goodwin, Kent Ipsen is competing 



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February 4, 2000 



COMMUNITY 

■ 



Lakeland Newspapers/ A3 




at mortgage burning 



By MICHAEL H. BABICZ 
Community Editor 



Thanksgiving is corning a little 
early, or late, but right on time for 
Faith Evangelical Lutheran Church 
of Antioch. 

A special Thanksgiving Service 
will be held Sunday, Feb, 6 at their 
existing gymnasium located adja- 
cent to the church building at 1275 S. 
Main SL 

Plans are to bum the mortgage 
for the new25-acre parcel located oh 
the northeast side of the Grass Lake 
Rd. and Rte. 59. 

The mortgage-burning celebra- 



tion is planned to begin with a pot- 
luck supper in the gymnasium at 
4:30 p.m: 

Following the supper, the 
Thanksgiving service will be held 
during which the mortgage will be 
burned. 

Plans are underway to move the 
church to its new Grass Lake Rd. 
home. 

The Peter Schwabe Architectural 
Co. is Working on plans for the new 
church and school for Faith Lutheran. 

The Schmeling Consulting 
Group has been brought on board to 
assist with a capital funding pro- 
gram. 



15th ice fishing derby 
planned for Loon Lake 



By MICHAEL H. BABICZ 
Community Editor 



Get those tip-ups and snowmo- 
bile suits ready. 

It is time for the Loon Lake 
Sportsman's Association 15th annu- 
al ice fishing derby. 

The traditional winter time fun 
event will be held 7 a.m. until 3 p.m. 
Saturday and Sunday, Feb. 5-6 on 
the loon Lakes in Antioch. 

The derby will be headquartered 
out of the Loon Lake Resort, with a 
satellite on East Loon Lake. 

Prizes will be awarded at the 
conclusion of each day'ssession. 

There, will Be bvef~$5,0Q0 fn 
tagged fish as well as prizes awarded 
for the largest fish in each of the cat- 



egories: northern-muskie, walleye, 
bass and panfish. 

Entry fee for the derby is $10 per 
day or $15 for both days with chil- 
dren under 16 free when accompa- 
nied by an adult. Registration is at 
the Loon Lake Resort and all entrants 
must be registered before they can 
fish the derby. - 

The famous "Sportsman's 
Breakfast" will be served, as usual, 
prepared by the world renowned 
"Chef Mickey" between 6-11 a.m. A 
small donation will be accepted. 

During the day, chili and hot J 
dogs will be available at the head- 
quarters agd the satellite. 
v- 'For further ihforrn'allon /contact 
Mickey 395-6233 or' Wes 838- 
LOON(5666). 



PM&L slates auditions 



Auditions for cast for "The Mira- 
cle Worker" will be held at 7 p.m. 
Sunday and Monday, Feb. 13 and 14, 
at PM&LTheatre, 877 Main St., Anti- 
och. 

The roles needed are for two 
children, one girl and one boy, with 
a minimum age of 12 requested. 
Four women and six men, ages late 
20's and up, are needed to be part of 
the cast, 

"The Miracle Worker," written 



by William Gibson, is a dramatiza- 
tion of the Helen Keller story and the 
relationship with her teacher, Annie 
Sullivan. 

The PM&L production will be di- 
rected by Gigi Willding from Ingle- 
side. 

The performances will run week- 
ends March31 through April 16. 

For further information on audi- 
tions or cast needs, phone 973- 
8134.— ByMichaelH. Babicz. 



Discount books now available 




Discount books are now avail- 
able. 

First National Bank-Employee 
Owned (FNBEO) in Antioch and 
Gurnee has 2000 Savers Club Dis- 
count Books are available for order. 

The 2000 Savers Club Discount 
Books are just one of the benefits 
offered to all Common Sense and 
Eagle 50 checking account holders 
at FNBEO. 



The Savers Club Discount Book 
offers savings on travel, dining, en- 
tertainment and other special ser- 
vices including 50 percent off on 
lodging nationwide. 

Anyone interested In finding 
out how to receive or; reorder 'a 
2000 Savers Club Discount book 
should call FNBEO at 838- 
BANK{2265).— By Michael H. 
Babicz. 



On tour 

Those on hand for a tour of the Antioch Community High School 
addition and dedication ceremony included from left, Vice Presi- 
dent of the school board Wayne Sobzcak, Antioch Township Su- 
pervisor Steve Smouse, Antioch Township Trustee Wanda 
Sobczak, Village of Antioch Trustee Larry Hanson and State Rep- 
resentative Tim Osmond. At right, Antioch Community High School 
Superintendent Dennis Hockney helps dedicate the new addition 
of the high school during the Jan. 23 ceremony in Antioch. 
—Photo by Candace H. Johnson . 





ge to 






The Antioch Department of 
Community Development is sched- 
uling five grand openings for Satur- 
day, Feb. 5. 

The Antioch Chamber of Com- 
■ merce -and Industry' wilOfe- part of 
the festivities. 

The morning begins at 8:30 a.m. 
with a dual welcome for KC's Ac- 
counting and Kimsuco Industries, 



both located at 425F Lake St. KC's 
owner is Karen Palka. Kimsuco wQl be 
represented byHelenKim.daughterof 
the owner, and director Nancy Walner. 

At 8:50. a.m. the group stops at 
'Katie's'Couhtry Cottage, 902 Main ; 
SL, to say hello to Kathy Martin. 

Grande Jakes located at 1200 
Main St. is next on the tour with, 
owner Jacob Rodriquez welcoming 



the group at 9:10. 

At 9:30 a.m., Chain O'Lakes Wa- 
ter Conditioner, 984 Rte. 59, Suite 10, 
wiU be welcomed with owner Bill 
. Thompson doing the honors;! 

Any Questions concerning the 
grand openings carrbe'referred to 
Biilie Horton of the community de- 
velopment department at 395- 
6342.— By Michael H. Babicz. 



ASK is offering more than karate 



Antioch Shotokan Karate(ASK) 
is coming into a busy time of year. 
* Besides the regular schedule of 
classes offered at 489 First St. in An- 
tioch, other events will be happen- 
ing. 

Pictures and videos are being 
gathered for a ASK Annual Family 
Video which will be going on sale in 
March. Pictures and videos should 
be submitted to Robin laranson or 
put in her file no later than the end 
of February. 

Basket weaving is being offered 
for a one-time special event on Fri- 
day, Feb. 11. The class, limited to 
15 slots, will be presented by Barb 
Brauer. Hours are 6:30-10:30 p.m. 
with completion of a basket taking 
three-four hours; The price range is 
$15-$55, depending upon which 
basket is chosen. 

People interested should con- 
tact Anna Conners at ASK. 

The ASK National Team mem- 
bers are in the midst of several fund 




OUR 
TOWN 

Michael H. Babicz 



raisers to help support the team in 
its travels to Richmond, Va. this 
summer for the 2000 Amateur Ath- 
letic Union(AAU) National Cham- 
pionships. 

The schedule of fund raising 
events has bake sales 3-6 p.m. Fri- 
day, Feb. 18 and 8:30 a.m.-noon 
Saturday, Feb. 19 at First National 
Bank-Employee Owned in Anti- 
och. 

Another bake sale is planned 
for noon-6 p.m. Friday, March 3 at 
the State Bank of the Lakes in An- 
tioch. 

A spaghetti dinner is scheduled 
5-8:30 p.m. Saturday, March 4 at 



ASK. Spaghetti with sauce and op- 
tional meatballs, plus bread, salad 
and drinks, will be available for $6 
per person and $3 for children ages , 
7 and under. 

A rummage sale is being 
planned for Sunday, May 7. Peo- 
ple with items they may wish to 
donate are asked to contact Anna 
Conners. 

Candy sales will be ongoing. If 
a member of the ASK team offers to 
sell a candy bar, support them if 
able. 

Individuals or businesses wish- 
ing to help the team with expenses 
for the nationals may contact ASK 
at395-KICK(5425). 



If you have interesting informa- 
tion or anecdotes to submit for 
"Our Town" call staff reporter Mike 
Babicz at 223-8161, ext. 138 ore- 
mail, edit @lnd. com. " 



Antioch News 

Vol. 1 15 No. 5 A Lakeland Newspaper Founded 1886 

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Managing Eitor 



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Accounting Manager 



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A4 / Lakeland Newspapers 



COMMUNITY 



February 4, 2000 



s. 



House numbering 
program underway 
by Fire Department 



By MICHAEL H. BABICZ 
Community Editor 



The Antioch Fire Department is 
working to make it easier to find lo- 
cations in case of emergency. 

While buildings and homes with- 
in the village limits of Antioch are rel- 
atively easy to find, those in unincor- 
porated parts of the township are 
more difficult to locate at times. 

"One of the biggest challenges 
firefighters face when responding to 
a call is locating a home that does not 
have proper numbering," admits 
Fire Chief Dennis R. Volling. 

"Often times the homeowner 
has taken down or moved the house 
numbers," Volling explained. 

There is an ordinance requiring 
all homes to have the address dis- 
played using three inch letters of a 
contrasting color. This is not always 
found, Volling said. 

In an effort to make it easier for 
emergency crews to find residents, 
the First Fire District of Antioch is 
initiating a pilot program to help 
overcome the problem. 

The district is purchasing reflec- 
tive signs which are installed at no 
cost to the homeowner. The signs 
are green with white lettering, and 
are made of a reflective material. 

The signs are placed at the end of 
the homeowner's driveway so when 
a emergency vehicle is driving down 
the road it makes it easier to find the 
location. 

The Indian Point subdivision was 




Because homes in unincorpo- 
rated parts of Antioch township 
are sometimes difficult to lo- 
cate, the fire department is In 
the process of numbering all 
homes that do not have a 
street address. 

the first to have signs put up. The next 
area will be the Villa Rica subdivision 
located off Grass Lake Rd. 

According to Volling, plans are to 
have signs throughout the entire dis- 
trict within the next year or two years 
at the most. 

Homeowners with questions are 
recommended to contact the fire 
district at 395-5511. 



Taxes Are Hazardous To Your Wealth 




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Be Tax Smart! 

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Take Advantage Of Retirement Vehicles 

Social Security may not be available in the future. Now more than 

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Club has 'Beary' nice donations 



By ANGELA D. SYKORA 
Staff Reporter 



Lakeland Community Club gave 
the Greater Round Lake Fire Protec- 
tion District a "beary" wonderful do- 
nation. 

Approximately 15 children, 
whose families are members of the 
social and charitable club, presented 
the fire department with 25 teddy 
bears to give'to children involved in 
crisis situations. 

In addition to planned adult and 
children's activities, the club holds 
fund-raisers to raise money for vari- 
ous causes. 

Vice President Kristi Benson, 
said the club used some of its fund- 
raising money to buy the teddy bears 
from Bear Magic of Lake County, an 
organization that sells stuffed ani- 
mals to groups for donation. 



"It went very well," said Benson, 
of die event. 

"After the donation, the kids 
took a tour of the firehouse, watched 
a safety video and had a pizza party 
with the firefighters," she said. 

Paula Rohrs, public education 
coordinator for the fire department, 
said the bears will be placed into am- 
bulances and other vehicles to give 
to children who are in an upsetting 
situation. 

"It helps to calm them down," 
said Rohrs. 

The Lakeland Community Club 
serves families in Undenhurst, Lake 
Villa, Antioch, Gurnee and Round 
Lake. 

Monthly public meetings are 
held the second Wednesday of each 
month at 7:30 p.m. at State Bank of 
the Lakes in Lindenhurst. 

The club welcomes new resi- 



dents to the area, and plans fun get- 
togethers for children and adults in- 
cluding restaurant and movie out- 
ings, golfing! bowling, holiday parties 
and more. 

They have several children's play 
groups established and also have a 
baby-sitting co-op. 

Anyone can become a member 
for $20 a year. Those interested are 
welcome to drop in on a meeting 
and check it out. 

In addition to monthly meetings, 
the club has a daytime social on the 
third Wednesday of every other 
month from 930-11:30 a.m. at State 
Bank of the Lakes. The rtext daytime 
social is March 15. 

For more information about 
joining Lakeland Community Club, 
contact Linda Dalinert, membership 
coordinator, at 265-6211; or Debra 
Sinclair, president, at 356-9214; 



CLC Board approves new degree options 



The College of Lake County 
board of trustees approved new 
associate in applied science degree 
options, one in Computer Infor- 
mation Systems (CIS) and another 
in Horticulture. 

The new Java Programmer CIS 
degree option will prepare stu- 
dents to write software in JAVA, a 
programming language used ex- 
tensively in web applications. 

The new Horticulture degree 
option, Natural Areas Manage- 
ment, will prepare students for ca- 
reers in restoring and maintaining 
natural areas like wetlands, prairies, 
savannas and woodlands. In addi- 
tion to the degree option, the board 



approved a 22-cred it-hour Natural 
Areas Management certificate. ■ 

Implementation of the new 
programs is subject to state ap- 
proval, the new offerings are being 
added as part of an ongoing col- 
lege effort to ensure that programs 
meet changing business and com- 
munity needs, according to Russell 
Peterson, vice president for educa- 
tional affairs. 

In related academic news, the 
board approved educational agree- 
ments with the University of Illi- 
nois (U of I) at Springfield and 
Franklin University of Columbus, 
Ohio, that will allow CLC students 
to complete bachelor's degrees on- 



line. Under the U of I agreement, 
CLC students who earn an associ- 
ate degree can complete an online 
bachelor of liberal studies program 
offered by the U of I through the 
Illinois Virtual Campus. Under the 
agreement with Franklin Universi- 
ty, CLC graduates will.be able to 
complete bachelor's degrees on- 
line in the areas of business ad- 
ministration, computer science, 
health service administration, 
technical administration and man- 
agement information systems. 
Both agreements enhance program 
options for CLC graduates and help 
to create a smooth transition from 
CLC, noted Peterson. 



FROM PAGE Al 



GAMES 



on the professional WSAsnocross 
circuit this season. 

Racing under the Skidoo colors, 
Kent Ipsen is ranked third following 
completion of about one-third of 
the professional tour. 



'While you're filling your 
home with love t don 't 
forget about Celestial Life 
Insurance 
from Pekin 
Life 

Insurance 
Company 



Celestial life is a high- 
performance universal life 
insurance plan with flexible 
premiums and a flexible 
death benefit selected by you. 
It pays current interest rates 
and will help protect all your 
family's tomorrows. 

See your local Pekin Insurance 
Agent today! 

Osmond Insurance 
Service Lid. 

976 Hillside 
Antioch, Illinois 6X1002 

847-395-2500 




Competing in snocross is very 
demanding both on man and ma- 
chine. The course is similar to a 
motocross style design with a series 
of jumps and turns involved. 

To keep in shape for competi- 
tion, during the offseason, Kent 
Ipsen works out three to four times 
per week along with running five 
miles in addition to working 10- 



hour days at his job. 

The combined efforts of the 
team with Kent ipsen's determina- 
tion and the family support are 
hoped to bring about continued 
positive results. 

Watch for the bright yellow No. 
40 machine this weekend in the 
tape-delayed coverage. Antioch 
may have an X Game champion 



vpekin; 




It's hard to miss the sign outside Ellyn and Brad Ipsen's Ameri- 
can Family Insurance Company in Antioch wishing their son, Kent, 
good luck at the World Snowmobile Association's Snocross cham- 
pionships in Vermont Feb. 4.— Photo by Sandy Bressner 



m. 



■re 

■ 



I 



, 



i 



\ 



February 4, 2000 . 



POLICE & FIRE 



Lakeland Newspapers/ A3 




POUCEBEfflT 

Persons charged with a crime arc innocent until proven guilty In a court of taw. 



ANTIOCH 



Traffic complaint 

Steven R. Viger, 51, 297-7 Ja- 
maica, Vacation Village, Fox Lake, 
was "stopped by Antioch Police at 
2:25 p.m. Jan. 29, An Antioch police 
officer was responding to a com- 
plaint regarding a male subject 
drinking beer while driving a black 
Ford Pickup at the State Bank of the 
Lakes, 440 Lake St., Antioch. Upon 
arriving at the bank, the police-offi- 
cer observed a vehicle matching the 
description in the drive-through line. 
When the truck exited the bank lot, it 
was reportedly observed failing to 
signal when making a left turn from 
Lake St. onto Orchard. The vehicle 
was pulled over at Orchard and Main 
St. When approaching the driver, 
Viger, the officer observed in plain 
view an open and half-full 12-ounce 
bottleofBudlcebeersittingberween 
the two front seats. When asked 
about the bottle, Viger reportedly re- 
sponded it was his. While speaking 
to Viger, the officer allegedly smelled 
a faint odor of an alcoholic beverage 
on his breath. The officer had Viger 
exit the vehicle and complete the 
field sobriety tests, which Viger did 
without error. Viger received a traf- . 
fie ticket for illegal transportation or 
possession of alcoholic liquor by a 
driver and was released. No court * 
date was set. 

Disorderly conduct 

Kenneth L Strohman, 29, 228 
Orbiter Dr., Round Lake Beach was 
arrested by Antioch Police at 3:19 
a.m. Jan. 30 at the Las Vegas .Restau- 
rant, 914 Main St., Antioch. Police 
responded to a call of a disturbance 
in progress. When officers arrived, 
Strohman was observed reportedly . 
shouting at the manager and other 
customers in the area. According to 
the report, Strohman appeared high- 
ly intoxicated with a strong odor of 
alcohol on his breath and red glassy, 
eyes. A female subject was observed 
attempting to calm Strohman down 
with negative results. 

The subjects were separated, 
with the officer speaking to the 
restaurant manager first. According 
to the manager, Strohman was being 
belligerent, yelling profanities about 
the disappointing level of service at 
the waitress. The manager was 
alarmed and disturbed by 
Strohman's actions and words, be- 
lieving a breach of the peace was 
committed. The manager wished to 
sign a complaint for disorderly con- 
duct and did not wish to have 
Strohman return to the restaurant. 
The manager said other customers 
left the restaurant because of 
Strohman's behavior. 

The officer spoke with 
Strohman, who told the officer "the 
service (was terrible)" and he want- 
ed everyone to know about it. 
Strohman reportedly said the whole 
incident was blown out of propor- 
tion and he was leaving. At that time, 
the officer placed Strohman under 
arrest and put him into a squad car 
for transportation to the Antioch Po- 
lice station.' 

The officer spoke with the fe- 
male accompanying Strohman, who 
reportedly said he was a little loud, 
but meant no harm by voicing his 
opinion. She apologized for the inci- 
dent and advised she was the desig- 
nated driver that evening and apolo- 
gized again. 

According to what the waitress 
told the officer, Strohman was being 
very loud and disturbing other cus- 
tomers with profanities and his loud 
nature. The waitress said she was 
serving Strohman's party their order 
when she was not fast enough and 
Strohman began yelling. The wait- 
ress advised the manager of the inci- 
dent and the manager attempted to 
resolve the matter by asking 
Strohman to refrain from using pro- 
fanities in her presence, but 
Strohman continued. 



Strohman was transported to the 
Antioch Police station where he was 
issued anon-traffic citation for dis- 
orderly conduct. Strohman was re- 
leased on personal recognizance to 
his female companion since she had 
not been drinking. Strohman has a 
court date of 9 a.m. Feb. 23 at Branch 
III Court in Grayslake. 

Warrant arrest 

, Joseph M. Schanes, 54, 23622 W. 
Park Terrace, Antioch, was stopped 
by Antioch Police at 2:12 a.m. Jan. 28 
while eastbound on Rte. 173 at Madi- 
son in Antioch. Schanes was report- 
edly driving a red Dodge Shadow, 
eastbound on Rte. 173 at Grimm Rd., 
weaving within the eastbound lane 
then acrossthe white fog line. When 
asked by the officer, Schanes pro- 
duced his driver's license, said he did 
not have proof of insurance In the 
vehicle and wasn't paying attention 
to his driving. When the license was 
run through a computer check, 
Schanes was found to be wanted on 
an outstanding warrant from the 
Lake County Sheriffs office for do- 
mestic battery with no bond. 
Schanes was placed under arrest and 
transported to Antioch Police sta- 
tion. Schanes was charged with im- 
proper lane usage and operating an 
uninsured vehicle. After posting his 
driver's license for bond, Schanes 
has a court date of 9 a.m. Feb. 23 at 
Branch III Court in Grayslake. 
Schanes was transported to the Lake 
County Jail where he was turned 
over to sheriffs authorities on the 
outstanding warrant. 

FOX LAKE 

Drive-offs reported 

Personnel at a Fox Lake gas sta- 
tion reported two drive-offs on Jan. 
30". The J&LGas Station reported dri- 
ve-offs of $10 and $6.41 worth of 
gasoline. 

Snowmobiles stolen 

A Fox Lake man told police two 
snowmobiles were stolen on Jan. 30. 
An Arctic and a Skidoo model were 
stolen, according to police reports. 

Cash stolen 

Fox Lake police continue to in- 
vestigate a theft of cash at Cigarette 
Depot, 68 Route 12. The thief in the 
Jan.. 29 robbery is described as. -a 
male, white, 6-foot, 10- inches, wear- 
ing a mask, A blue vinyl purse and 
bank bang with $3,000 were stolen, 
police said. 

Drug-related incidents 

Two Fox Lake men were arrested 
. and charged with possession of 
drugs and intent to deliver on Jan. 29. 
Justen P. Johnson, 24, 139 Arthur, 
Apt. 3, and Robert A. Dowdy, 21, 44 
E. OakSt., were charged. Dowdy was 
released on $40,000 recognizance 
bond. Johnson was remanded on 
$100,000 bond. 

John H. Vogt Jr., 36, of 937 Quin- 
cy CU, Mt. Prospect, was arrested 
• and charged with unlawful posses- 
sion of a controlled substance and 
unlawful possession of a hypoder- 
mic needle on Jan. 28 at Route 12 
and Grand Ave. 



JOHNSBURG 



Jailed in armed robbery attempt 



ByTlMO'DONNELL 
Staff Reporter 



The Mundelein Police Depart- 
ment arrested a subject in an at- 
tempted armed robbery of the 
Domino's Pizza on 837 S. LakeSt. 

Jesse A. Chicas, 20, of Mundelein 
was arrested on Jan. 26 at 6 p.m. af- 
ter the police received an anony- 
mous tip. 

On Dec. 24, Chicas, wearing 
black clothes and a black mask, al- 
legedly approached the lone clerk in 
the store, showing him the handle of 
a gun in his pants. 



Sex offender, drivers 
license violations 

A 45 year-old McHenry man was 
arrested for driving while license sus- 
pended by Johnsburg police on Jan. 
25. Gerald J. Quarzenski's case was 
turned over to Grayslake police for a 
warrant for failure to register as a sex 
offender. A court date of Feb. 15 was 
assigned. He was arrested at Wilmot 
and Torrey roads in Johnsburg. 



Chicas forced the clerk into a 
back freezer, taking the keys to the 
cash box. 

As he attempted to open the 
cash box, the delivery driver came in 
th^door.- 

Thinking Chicas had left, the 
clerk came out or die freezer. The 
clerk kicked the assailant down, 
knocking the gun loose from his 
hands. Chicas pulled a knife on the 
clerk and threatened to kill him. He 
then escaped through the back door. 

Police recovered a B.B. gun that 
resembled a .45 caliber handgun at 
the scene. 



• After they arrested Chicas, the 
police found the clothes and knife 
that were used in the attempted rob- 
bery* at his residence. They also 
found an newspaper article from 
when the original incident occurred 
hanging on his mirror. 

Chicas was charged with at- 
tempted armed robbery because he 
did not get away with any money. He 
was also charged with aggravated as- 
sault for threatening the clerk while 
concealing his face. 

Chicas is currently being held at 
the Lake County Jail, on a $100,000 
cash bond. 




Garage fire collapses roof, damages ears 

Man suffers smoke inhalation trying to fight car fire 



ByTIMO'DONNELL 
Staff Reporter 



A fire in an underground parking 
garage on the 13000 blockofHeiden 
Circle caused the lot's roof to col- 
lapse, crushing three cars, fire offi- 
cials said. 

Eric Boulton. 42, a resident of the 
condominium complex that the 
garage serviced, was injured in the 
fire and later hospitalized in serious 
condition. 

At about 2:50 a.m . Boulton tried 
to extinguish a fire that had started 
in his car, officials said. While he 
was doing this, he suffered smoke 
inhalation. 

The car fire spread to two other 
cars, causing an intense heat inside 
the garage. The heat caused part of 
the ceiling structure to. collapse 
onto the three burning cars. The 
cause of the fire is undetermined. 



In all, about 60 cars were dam- 
aged by the heat and smoke created 
by the fire. Total damages from the 
fire were estimated between 
$200,000 and $300,000. 

Smoke from the fire permeated 
the condos above, causing the evac- 
uation of about 40 units. 



Fire departments from Country- 
side, Deerfield, Gumee, Grayslake, 
Knollwood, Lake Forest, Lake Zurich, 
Mundelein, North Chicago and 
Waukegan lent equipment and per- 
sonnel to help fight the fire. Equip- 
ment from four other departments 
was on call at the LibertyvUle stations. 



Man faces 12 years for cocaine 



Richard Klass, 47, of Mundelein 
could face up to 12 years in prison af- 
ter he plead guilty to possession of a 
controlled substance on Jan. 27. 

Klass was arrested on Aug. 6 af- 
ter a search of his house by the 
Mundelein Police' Department un- 
covered roughly two ounces of pow- 
dered cocaine stashed in the kitchen 
and living room. 



The illegal substance had a street 
value of around $3,000. 

The maximum penalty for this 
charge is usually 15 years, but a plea 
negotiation limited Klass' sentence' 
to a maximum of 12 years. 

Klass posted 10 percent of a 
5150,000 bond. His sentencing hear- 
ing will be held on March 17. — By 
Tim O'Donnell 





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A6 / Lakeland Newspapers 



COMMUNITY 



February 4,2000 




Winning ways 

Robert Nelson, 6, checks out his winning time of 2.4945 seconds, 
posted on the door after the Scout Pack 191 Pirtewood Derby, held 
at Oakland Grade School Jan. 20.— Photo by Kirsten N. Hough 



Land Grant applications accepted 



Department of Natural Re- 
sources Director Brent Manning an- 
nounced that applications are now 
available for the Open Land Trust 
grant program, Governor George 
Ryan's landmark initiative to acquire- 
and protect open space for future 
generations., 

"The program provides grants to 
eligible local governments, to protect 
open space, wildlife habitat, water- 
sheds, greenways and natural areas 
and to provide enhanced outdoor 
recreational opportunities," Man- 
ning said. "As the population grows 
and development pressures in- 
crease, the Open Land Trust will pro- 
vide local communities wiUi the help 
they need to retain open space for all 
of us to enjoy." 

The grants, administered by the 
Department of Natural Resources, 
provide up to 50 percent state fund- 
ing assistance for approved property 



acquisition projects. The maximum 
grant award for a single project is $2 
million. 

Local project sponsors may be 
any unit of local government with 
statutory authority to acquire, devel- 
op and maintain land for public out- 
door, natural resource related recre- 
ation. 

"Individuals and organizations 
involved in natural resource and 
open space conservation can partic- 
ipate in partnership with eligible lo- 
cal government agencies on Open 
Land Trust grant applications," 
Manning said. "Public support and 
private donations can enhance open 
space government, park or forest 
preserve district about this pro- 
gram." 

Grants are awarded on a com- 
petitive basis and are paid as reim- 
bursements to local sponsors. Prop- 
erty may be acquired only from will- 



ing sellers. 

Land acquired through the pro- 
gram must be maintained in perpe- 
tuity for public open space and nat- 
ural resource recreation purposes 
through the signing of a conserva- 
tion easement. Allowable activities 
may include bird watching and 
wildlife viewing, boating, fishing, 
hunting, hiking, bicycling, horseback 
riding and primitive camping. 

Applications will be evaluated 
based on the project's ability to meet 
statewide and local recreation and 
conservation needs, site characteris- 
tics and the applicant's past perfor- 
mance on IDNR grant projects. 

The application deadline for the 
first round of the Open Land Trust 
grant program is April 3. For more in- 
formation, contact the IDNR Divi- 
sion of Grant Administration, 524 S. 
Second St., Springfield, IL 62701- 
1787, call (217) 782-7481. 



Camp Fire Boys/Girls celebrate Rid Day 




What are you. doing; 
Saturday Night? 

cc^m LIGHTHOUSE 

1 - 5 Church of Antioch 



Relevant Messages .Uplifting Music 

Family Friendly Atmosphere w/Nursery provided 



Services begin at 7pm on SATURDAYS. 

We are located at 554 Parkway in Antioch, IL 

(1 block W. of Rt. 83 off of North Ave.) 

FOR MORE INFORMATION CALL: (847) 838-0616 

Pastor Tom Bartmer 

'piercing lite, darkness tolth the tight cf/^csus Christ! 



Camp Fire Boys and Girls cele- 
brates Absolutely Incredible Kid Day 
2000 on March 16. Each year on the 
third Thursday of March, children 
across the country receive heart- 
warming messages from moms, 
dads, grandparents, brothers and 
sisters, mentors and celebrities, to 
recognize the fact that each child is 
indeed an Absolutely Incredible Kid. 

"Writing a letter to a child is a 
simple action that means so much to 
the children as well as to the letter 
writers," says Metropolitan Chicago 
Council president Marianne Hiland. 
"There is something wonderful 
about putting feelings in writing. 
What a great way to let kids know we 
believe in them. Besides, a personal 
letter is cherished and valued, and a 



novelty in today's technological 
world." 

The Metropolitan Chicago 
Council of Camp Fire, one of the 125 
Camp Fire councils throughout the 
country, serves over 5,200 children 
each year in Cook, Lake and McHen - 
ry Counties by offering children 
kindergarten to grade 12 a club pro- 
gram, self-reliance classes, and spe- 
cial events in schools, parks, and 
community centers. All Camp Fire 
programs develop life skills, engage 
youth in community service pro- 
jects, and decrease their risk of delin- 
quency. 

"Camp Fire Boys and Girls creat- 
ed Absolutely Incredible Kid Day be- 
cause we were looking for a way to 
honor all youth," says Stewart Smith, 



H&R BLOCK 



1040. That's a lot of weight to carry on your shoulders. 

Trying to do your own taxes is quite a burden. Fortunately, we do it for a living to make sure you get everything 

you have coming. And to speed things up there's Rapid Refund®.. 




Rapid 
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H&R BLOCK 



Electronic Filing 






Antioch 

426 Lake St 

(847)395-6230 

McHenry 
5102 W. Elm St 
(815)385-8630 

O 2000 MAR Ulock Tm Service*. Inc. 



Fox Lake 
2 W.Grand Ave 
(847)587-9333 

Round Lake 
629 W. Rollins Rd 
(847)546-4862 



Gurnee 
6695F Grand Ave 
(847)856-0012 

Wauconda 
474B W. Liberty St 
(847)526-8877 



national executive director of Camp 
Fire Boys and Girls. "Our hope is that 
parents, relatives, teachers, coaches, 
and friends share positive messages 
year-round, but this is a call to action 
that specifically asks adults to put the 
words in writing, to create a memo- 
rable keepsake." 

Corporations, shopping malls, 
religious congregations, businesses, 
and organizations nationwide (and 
locally) support Absolutely Incredi- 
ble Kid Day through letter-writing 
campaigns on-site or as employ- 
ee/member activities. Cities and 
states across the nation proclaim the 
third Thursday of March Absolutely 
Incredible Kid Day, including the 
State of Illinois, the City of Chicago, 
and many of the surrounding sub- 
urbs, President Bill Clinton has writ- 
ten an Absolutely Incredible Kid Day 
letter to the children of the United 
States each year since AlKD's incep- 
tion In 1996. Numerous service orga- 
nizations have taken on the job of 
writing Absolutely Incredible Kid 
Day letters to children in hospitals, 
shelters, and care facilities. 

Camp Fire Boys and Girls creat- 
ed "Letters from the Heart: A Cele- 
bration of Letters to Absolutely In- 
credible Kids" to celebrate Absolute- 
ly Incredible Kid Day and the impact 
it is having on lives of children and 
adults everywhere. We estimate hun- 
dreds of thousands of letters have 
been sent during the last four years, 
and the book is a 100-page compila- 
tion of touching letters. "Letters from 
the Heart" will be available in March 
2000 through retail outlets or by vis- 
iting Camp Fire Boys and Girls web 
site at www.campfire.org. 

Camp Fire Boys and Girls builds 
caring, confident youth and future . 
leaders. This Mission is manifested 
by programs such as Absolutely In- 
credible Kid Day, Valentines for Vet- 
erans, and local community service 
projects. 

Now in its fourth year, Absolute- 
ly Incredible Kid Day has touched 
the hearts of millions of children. 
. The goal of the campaign Is to honor 
children— not only those involved in 
Camp Fire Boys and Girls — but every 
child in America. 



Da give us 

HOT 
NEWS 
TIPS 

call Lakeland 

Newspapers at 

223-8073 

You can leave your 

name and number 

or remain anonymous. 

Leave a message and 

we'll check it out! 



■ i t t t * • 










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In- 
ef- 
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February 4, 2000 



■-• v— .-. _ 



NEIGHBORS 



-_»r_ ii-,»* 







Lakeland Newspapers) A7 




By MICHAEL H.BABICZ 
Community Editor 



Audiences can "meet" Pablo 
Picasso and Albert Einstein as 
young men in "Picasso At The 
Lapin Agile" on the PM&L Theatre 
stage, 877 Main St., in downtown 
Antioch. 

The performance debuts at 8 
p.m. Friday, Feb. 4. Performances 
continue Fridays Feb, 11 and 18, Sat- 
urdays, Feb. 5, 12 and 19 at 8 p.m., 
and Sunday afternoons at 2:30 p.m. 



coming 



Feb. 6, 13 and 20. 

Ken Smouse from Antioch di- 
rects this comedy written by Steve 
Martin. 

Reservations can be made by 
calling 395-3055 or stopping by the 
box office. Box office hours are Mon- 
day through Thursday, 5:30-7:30 
p.m., Saturday, 11 am.-2 p.m. and 90 
minutes prior to curtain times on 
performance dates. Tickets are $10 
for adults and $8 for students and se- 
nior citizens. 

Martin's first original play, a 




comedy-drama "Picasso At The 
Lapin Agile," was presented by 
Chicago's prestigious Steppenwolf 
Theatre. It inaugurated the facili- 
ty's third floor Studio Theatre. Fol- 
lowing rave reviews arid extended 
runs in Chicago, the play experi- 
enced further success in Boston, 
Los Angeles and played off Broad- 
way in New York at the Promenade 
Theatre to critical and audience 
acclaim. 

Rob Findiay from Antioch and 
John Franco from Mundelein have 



been selected to perform the two 
leading roles. Supporting cast are 
Fran Jansta, Torn Hausman, Jackie 
Bigalke and Regina Reynolds', all 
from Antioch; Mary Campbell from 
Ingleside, Darren Walsh from Wood- 
stock, Terry O'Brien from Lake Villa, 
Courtney Podraza from Crystal Lake 
and Kenelm Scheske from Salem, 
Wis. 

PM&L theatre is labeling the 
performance "PG-13," noting young 
children will not understand nor ap- 
preciate the production. 



Antioch school 
to host fair 

U is Fun Fair time!. 

A day .of games, prizes, raffles, 
cake walks, food, kids crafts, and 
more is planned 11 a.m.-3 p.m. Sat- 
urday, Feb. 5 at Antioch Lower Grade 
School. 

The seventh annual fun fair will 
start off with something new this 
year. 

At 11 a.m. will be a talent show. 
The show will feature the antics and 
talents of many of the District 34 stu- 
dents. 

'Magician "Magic Dave" will have 
two performances at noon and 1 p.m. 

Food available will include pizza, 
hot dogs, brownies, pretzels and 
more. 

The day is hosted by the Antioch 
Lower Grade School PTO. 

.There is no admission charge. 
Children must be accompanied by 
an adult. 

For further information, phone 
838-8900.— By Michael H. Babicz 



By MICHAEL H.BABICZ 
Community Editor 




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Attention all married women in 
the Antioch area. 

Applications are being accepted 
for women desiring to compete for the 
tide of Mrs. Antioch International. 

The Antioch pageant is an offi- 
cial preliminary to the Mrs. Illinois 
International Pageant which is to be 
presented June 3 at the Pheasant 
Run Resort in St Charles. ■ 

The woman chosen as Mrs. An- 
tioch will become an ambassador 
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. Call the Lakeland Newspapers 
Circulation Dept. for newsstand 
locations or more information at 

(847)245-7500 




ageant 



The winner of the Mrs. Illinois 
International competition will re- 
ceive an all expenses paid trip to 
Knoxville; Tenri. for 'the national 
competition in August, as well as a 
number of other prizes. 

Competitions will include inter- 
view, aerobic wear and evening 
gown. Pageant organizers empha- 
size there is no swimsuit- competi- 
tion. 

Married women living in the An- 
tioch area interested in entering the 
Mrs. Illinois International Pageant 
should call 630-393-1240 or visit their 
web site at www.mreillinois.com for 
further information or an application. 



Bank offers 
discount books 

Discount books are now avail- 
able. 

First National Bank-Employee 
Owned (FNBEO) in Antioch and 
Gumec has 2000 Savers Club Dis- 
' count Books are available for order. 

The 2000 Savers Club Discount 
Books are one of the benefits offered 
to all Common Sense and Eagle 50 
checking account holders at the bank. 

The Savers Club Discount Book 
offers savings on travel, dining, en- 
tertainment and other special ser- 
vices,' including 50 percent off on 
lodging nationwide. 

Anyone interested in finding out 
how to receive or reorder a 2000 
Savers Club Discount book should 
call the bank at 838-2265. 



Caring for a relative with 
Alzheimer's Disease? 

Now, there's a free program to 
'help ybu find time for yourself. 





>1I? 



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A new service OF Victory Community EtderCARE* 
Victory Memorial Hospital. • Waukegan 



Health Tip for a Healthy Trip 

by JIM WARNKEN, President, North Star Travel, Inc. 



There isn't anything more disappointing than getting sick on 
your vacation; Merc arc some tips fo help avoid illness while 
traveling. 

Prc-lrip planning is your first step to a healthy trip. 

Immunizations, though seldom required anymore, should be 
gotten well in advance. Certain shots can cause adverse side 
effects, which are better chanced while still at home, rather than -on 
your trip. 

Slock up on frequently-used pharmaceutical products, such as 
aspirin, stomach aids, etc. Band-Aids arc not only valuable for 
cuts, but also for the inevitable blisters, which will occur on feet 
not used to excessive walking. 

If you take medication on a regular basis, check with your 
doctor to sec if die dosage should be adjusted for altitude, long 
plane flights, or unusual climates: 

If you suffer' from motion sickness, your doctor can prescribe a 
type of patch worn behind the ear. However, I have had excellent 
experience with n non-drug item called a "Sea-Band." It's a band 
worn around the wrist, exerting pressure on an acupressure point. 

"Don*t drink the water " is still good advice, even if the trip is 
just to Florida. Sensitive stomachs will.find that normally harmless 
bacteria in certain water supplies will do some real nasty things. 
This also applies to ice cubes. in bar drinks. Freezing docs. not kill 
bacteria, nor docs alcohol. 

Canned pop, hot colTec. and tea are your safest drinks. Avoid 
dairy, products in any form. Pasteurization is still not practiced 
worldwide. 

What health problem has ruined more vacations than any other? 
Sunburn. The sun is much stronger in Florida than back in the 
midwest. "Higher altitudes can also be a Tactor in sunburn, 
something to remembcrin Reno. 

Common sense und a little planning will assure a healthy 
vacation. 

«^AV££ 

NORTH ^f^ STAR 

CRUISES 

Liiulenhurst 
www.northslartravel .com 

(847) 356-2000 




;'--"3 



Friday, Feb. 4 

7:30 p.m., Lake County Camera 
Club meets at Warren Twp. Center 
Citizen Bldg. on Washington St. in 
Gurnee, Info, at 856-1583 



s 



Fri. & Sat at 8 p.m., Sun. at 2:30 
p.m., PM&L Theatre presents the 
comedy "Picasso at the Lapin 
Agile" at the theatre, 877 Main St 
in Antioch, Tickets $10/adults, 
$8/students, call for tickets at 
395-3055 

Saturday, Feb. 5 i 

9 a.m., Lake County Women 
Interested in Government Service 
(WINGS) holds breakfast meeting - u 
at Bellini's Restaurant, Rte. 137 

6 Rte. 21 in Ubertyville. $12/ 
members, $15/non-members. Call • 
526-0306, reserVs, at 360-6673 

10 a.m.-6 p.rm , Sunday also, 
Lake County Home & Garden Expo 
held at Lake County Fair Grounds, 
Rte. 45 & 120 in Grayslake 

11 a.m.-3 p.m., Antioch. Lower 
Grade School's 7th Annual Fun 
Fair held at the school. Games, 
prizes, raffles, food, magician, 
crafts and more. Children must be 
accompanied by adult For more 
info., call 838-8900 

Sunday, Feb. 6 

7-9 p.m., Open Gym at ACHS, 
cost $2, adults only 

Monday, Feb. 7 

I p.m., Prairie Pioneers #1081, 
an organization for the study of 
antiques and the preservation of 
heritage, meets at private home. 
For more info., call 223-4001 

7 p.m., Antioch Garden Club 
meets in the Maplethorpe Room at 

. the Antioch Comm. Center, visitors . 
welcome, for more, call 395-3803 

6:45 p.m., Bingo at Antioch 
Moose Lodge, Rte. 173, 2 miles 
west of Antioch, info, at 395-9780 

'■*" " " i 

7. p.m. Network of Friends, Multi- 
ple Sclerosis support group meets 
at the Antioch Moose Lodge 

* 

7 p.m., Lakes Area Community 
Band at ACHS, call 395-6729 

Tuesday, Feb. 8 

II a.m. AARP meets at Antioch 
Senior Center, 817 Holbeck Dr., 
call 395-5068 for more 

6:45 p.m. Antioch VFW Bingo, 
doors open 4:30 p.m., 395-5393 

Wednesday, Feb. 9 

7:30 a.m., The American Business 
. Women's Association, Express 
Network of the Lakes meets at 
Novel Coffee, 1132 Main Street „ 
(Rtes. 173 & 83) in Antioch. Call 
Karen 395-3454, 9 a.m. to noon 

10 a.m., Lake County Women's 

Club meets at State Bank of the 

Lakes in Grayslake. For info., call ; ;> 

540-1142 or 548-9680 

. v . .■■•- .•••<> ••■•■ 

1:00 p.m., Antioch Woman's Club 
meeting at United Methodist 
Church of Antioch, call 395-4210 

Thursday, Feb. 10 

7:15-8:30 a.m., The Womens 
Referral Assoc, meets at Copper 
Creek Grill on Lakeview Parkway, 
east of Butterfield Rd. in Vernon 
Hills. Call Jeanne at 387-1500 

"• * '■"" ...»•"... 

8-9 a.m., Network Lake County, a 
business networking group, meets 
at Ih-Laws restaurant in Gumee, 
guests invited, call 548-5305 : 

GOT SOMETHING 
GOING ON? CALL US! 

A 14-day notice is needed , . 
for all calendar requests. 
Call 223-8161 andaskfbr 
calendar assistance. Or e-mail 
calendar@lpnews.com 




A8/ Lakeland Newspapers 



COMMUNITY 




February 4, 2000 




Giving the gift of life 

Sue Rathbone of Ufesource in Glenview, takes blood from donor Joan Lahgly, at a blood drive held 
at St Peter Church/School in Antioch Jan. 22.— Photo by Kirsten N. Hough 

RC Free Throw champions named 



Nine boys and girls from 
Antioch, iindenhurst, Spring Grove 
and Silver Lakes, Wis., ages 10 to 14, 
were named local champions of the 
2000 Knights of Columbus Free 
Throw Championship and have 
earned the right to compete at the 
district level. 

Father" Alfred J. Henderson- 
Council 3800 in Antioch spon- 
sored the local competition at St. 
Peter's School gym. All young- 
sters ages 10 to 14 were eligible to 



participate. 

Kevin Cahiil was the winner of 
the 10-year-old boys division. In the 
11-year-olds bracket, Kari Anderson 
was the girls' champion and Kevin 
Huebner was the boys' champion. 
Twelve-year-old winners in the girls 
and boys divisions were Kim Keef, 
and David Chesonis. 

The 13-year-old girls division 
was won by Renee Riedel and the 
boys by Taylor Pechauer. Fourteen- 
year-old champions were Amanda 



Axe in the girls bracket and Brandon 
Ziemann in the boys. Each contes- 
tant was allowed 15 free-throw 
attempts in the contests. Ties were 
settled by successive rounds of five 
free-throws per contestant until a 
winner emerged. 

Each of these winners will com- 
pete in the district competition to be 
held on Feb. 12 at St. Joseph's in 
Round Lake with an eye toward 
moving on to the Regional, State 
and International levels. 



^^^ 






SIX AVOIDABLE 

RISK FACTORS FOR 

HEART DISEASE 



. SMOKING • BLOOD PRESSURE . CHOLESTEROL • WEIGHT . 
. ACTIVITY LEVEL * BEHAVIORAL STYLE (how calm you are) * 

Victory's Cardiac Rehabilitation Program in 
Lindenhurst can help you lower your risk! 

Our Cardiac Rehabilitation Program at the Victory Surgery and Treatment 
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to lower these avoidable risk factors. It is a fully individualized 
program designed for people at high risk of developing coronary 
artery disease (CAD) or who have been diagnosed with CAD. 

■Our program includes education on diet, stress management, 

behavior modification and exercise. Circuit training exercises 

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stationary bicycles, arm ergometers, rowing machines, 

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located off Grand Avenue on the Victory Lakes Campus) 

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Lindenhurst, Illinois 60046 



Head for the hills 



Today's youth are such 
spoiled, over-indulged 
whimps. As a kid, winter's 
first significant snow fall 
was a cherished event. My siblings 
and I would lay awake in our.beds 
on those winter morning, waiting 
.for the ultimate dream; a snow day. 
It seems back then' we had a lot 
more snow, or maybe that was just 
the innocence of viewing life from 
the eyes of a youngster. Of course 
had it been a normal "off to school 
you go" kind of morning, we would 
reluctantly pull ourselves out from 
under our quilts and shuffle off to 
prepare for the day. 

But on those "snow days," we 
would bound out of bed and into 
long underwear quicker than mom 
could tussle our hair. The minutes 
raced by as we dressed in old wool 
socks, two pairs of mittens, snow 
pants, boots and the soon-to-be 
discarded scarf. (Once out of sight 
from the kitchen window, the scarf 
became the rope that tied your sled 
to your best buddy's so you could 
go down the hill in tandem.) 

We would return home only to 
replace wet mittens and socks, 
which mom kept putting in the 
dryer for the next change. We 
would wax up the metal runners on 
our sleds using mom's good can- 
dles, and those grand old wooden 
toboggans held at least eight kids at 
a time. 

We invented new games and 
took precarious chances like try- 
ing to guide a two-foot wide sled 
through a one-and-a-half foot 
opening between two older-than- 
dirt oak trees. We would travel 
down the snow laden hill on sleds- 
piled three and four people high, 
and we all lived by the golden 
rule: "Never, ever walk up the 
trail." 

Sledding has remained one of 
my favorite winter time hobbies. 
After the last snow fall, the kids and 
I dressed in our overly-insulated 
outerwear and were ready to hit the 
hills. 

I was prepared to skip dinner 
and sled till every fiber on my DNA 
was frozen. After the first time 




JINGLE 

FROM 

PRINGLE 

Lynn Pringle 



down the powdery white fluff, com- 
plete with a face full of fresh snow, 
child number one proceeded to 
walk right up the freshly made trail. 
I about had a coronary, and 
screaming like an old fish woman I 
howled, "You never walk up the 
trail." All the kids looked at me like 
I had three eyes on my forehead. 

The second ride down 
brought moans that the sled was 
too heavy to carry, so 1 dragged 
up the flimsy piece of blue plastic 
they call sleds. After the third ride 
down, the old fuss-budgets were 
whining how tired they were, and 
wanted me to pull them up the 
hill; they were worn out. I stood at 
the bottom of the hill, my sails 
totally deflated. 

I closed my eyes, trying to keep, 
my wits, and pictured my dad 
stringing make-shift lights up so my 
siblings and I could see once the 
sun set and our sledding day car- 
ried over into the night hours. As I 
opened my eyes and saw my off- 
spring standing there, dressed in 
their well insulated garb, not the 
least bit cold, wet or numb, 1 shook 
my head to clear away the nasty 
thoughts! and ushered them all 
back into the house.. I returned to 
the hill. For awhile they all stood in 
the window and watched their 
loony mom, praying none of their 
friends would stop by and witness 
this sight. 

Eventually they lost Interest 
and went about their business. I, 
myself, missed dinner that night 
but my kids missed a lot more. 

And so goes another "Jingle 
from Pringle." 

Readers with information for 
"Jingle from Pringle" should call 
Lynn Pringle at 395-6364. 



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THE 
CUPBOARD 

John Phelps 



It's sure 
to be chili! 



The bad news is is that it will 
probably be quite brisk a 
week from Saturday when 
the crazy die-hards hit to 
the links, partaking in the Annual 
Chill Open at Brae Loch Golf 
Course, located off Route 45 by The 
College of Lake County in 
Grayslake. 

The good news, however, is that 
if it hasn't been sensed already, golf 
will be played here in February. 
Which shouldn't come as any 
suprise-I played in some pretty in- 
clement weather over my 27 years 
of withstanding abuse from this sil- 
ly game. 

Anyone and everyone is invited 
to come and tackle old man winter 
to the tune of nine holes, which will 
be preceeded by an all-you-can-eat 
chili lunch. 

The event, sponsored In con- 
junction with Lake County Forest 
Preserves, will feature take home 
door prizes and awards as well as 
special prizes for the Best Dressed 
Dapper and Daffy Duffers. 

The entry fee is only $25 with 
pre-paid registration required Call 
(B47) 223-5542 to reserve your four- 
some. 

ftow, for the less inclined to en- 
counter those snow bunkers, pre- 
vailing winds, there is relief] 

And it can be found, yes, at an 
indoor venue known as the 
Chicago Golf Show,.the nation's 
oldest, largest and best golf cxibi- 
tion. 

The event, in its i7th year, will 
be held February 11-13 at the Rose- 
mont Convention Center in Rose- 
mont 

Perhaps one of the main attrac- 
tions forcasted for this year will be a 
New Club Swing Area. 

Not only can you swing the lat- 
est in equipment heading into the 
new campaign, golfers will also be 
able to actually hit golf balls in this 
area free of charge. 

And as usual, PGA and LPGA 
Professionals will be on hand assist- 
ing perspective buyers with equip- 
ment that best suites their swings, 
with one-on-one instruction also 
available. 

Tom Corcoran, managing part- 
ner of the show, says that the New 
Club Swing Area is so popular that 
club manufacturers for 2000 have 
contracted for their own individual 
hitting areas to demos t rate their 
brands of clubs. 

A long drive and Chicago's 
Longest Putt Contest will also high- 
light the schedule. 

The golf show will feature more 
than 300 exibiUng companies offer- 
ing every golf product and service 
under the sun. 

From golf equipment-clubs, 
balls, shoes, clothing, etc.-to golf 
vacations will be on hand for the 
some 20,000-plus avid golfers who 
visit this annual gala every year. 

The First Tee Welcome Area will 
await golfers, where they will be 
able to register to win valuable 
prizes, from trips to dinners to golf 
equipment 

Interested parties can obtain 
more Information by calling (312) 
54 1 -0567 or visit the website at 
www.chicagogolfshow.com. 

There's definitely something for 
everyone. Get a jump on the sea- 
son-it will be here before you know 
it. For some of us, it actually never 
ended and never will. 

John Phelps can be reached at 
(847) 223-8161, ext. 132; fax (847) 
223-881 0; or e-mail at 
edit@lnd.com 




February 4, 2000 



Lakeland Newspapers /A9 



■ 



Sequoit gymnasts continue excitment for first-year coach 



Bessette named 
NSC Co-Coach of 
TheYear 



By JOHN PHELPS- 
Sports Editor 



Debbie Bessette didn't know 
what to expect in her first year as 
head coach of the Antioch varsity 
girls gymnastics team. 

One given though is that the na- 
tive of Holland, who herself is quite 
an accomplished gymnast, has seen 
some excitement. 

And from the looks of things, 
more is in store for next week and 
definitely next year. 

"It's been very exciting and we're 
very happy to have two girls qualify 
for sectionals,'' said Bessette, who 
was honored as the North Suburban 
Conference co-Coach of The Year 
following Saturday's conference 
meet at Libertyville. 

"Most of my experience has 
been with younger kids, so to have 
my first coaching job (with older 
girls) is very exciting as well as re- 
warding." 

Well, Bessette can be very proud 
of herSequoits, who have made ma- 
jor strides this season. 

Last Saturday was a prime exam- 
ple. 

' That's when Antioch turned in a 
solid fourth-place effort in the North 
Suburban meet 

Freshman Jenna Diemer earned 
all-conference honors after taking 
third in the uneven parallel bars, 
where she recorded a score of 9200. 
Diemer also finished 15th in the 
vault (9.00), 10th In the balance 
beam (8.80), and 18th in the floor ex- 
ercise (8.40), giving her seventh place 
in the all-around with a score of 
35.40. . 

Senior Cam! Hackney also 
turned in a solid meet, finishing 13th 
in the all-around (34.20). 

Her evening included eighth In ■ 
the floor (8.90), 10th in the beam 
(8.80), 18th in the bars (8.30), and 
24lh in the vault (8.20). 

Junior Jackie Cemey finished 
16th in the all-around (33.850). Her 
outing included sixth in the vault 
(9.250), 16th in the bars (8.40), 17th 
in the beam (8.00), and 21st in the 
floor exercise (8.20). 

Others contributing to the team 
score included sophomore Liz 




The Antioch varsity girls gymnastics team has given first-year coach Debbie Bessette (middle row, 
far left) and assistant Noreen Johnson (middle row, far right) a lot to be excited about The team 
consists of (in no order) Jenna Diemer, Uz Miedona, Carni Hackney, Jackie Cerney, Becky Geyer, 
Ashley Myers, Angela Loi, Candace Cassara, Sharon Gray, Aubrey Goetzinger, and Robin Deckert. 
The team proudly displays Bessette's North Suburban co-Coach of The Year Award.— Pho to by Steve 
Young. 



Miedona, who's best effort was a 
20th in the bars (820). She wound up 
23rd in the all-around. 

Freshman all-arounder Becky 
Geyer turned in an 8.10 in the vault, 
a 7.70 in the bars, a 6.450 in the 
beam, and a 730 in the floo r to finish 
21st in the all-around (29.550). 

Meanwhile, the JV girls finished 
fifth in Saturday's meet 

The Sequoits were led by Ashley 
Myers, who finished ninth in the all- 
around (25.200). Myers' best efforts 
were in the beam (6.50), where she 
placed 15th, and the bars (5.80), 
which earned her 16th place. 

Other top efforts were turned in 
by Robyn Deckert, Angela Loi, and 
Candace Cassara in the vault Deck- 
ert added a 21st place finish in the 
bars. 

Diemer and Hackney carried 
their fortunes over to Tuesday's 
Stevenson regional, where, as a 
team, die Sequoits finished third out 
of five teams with 131.175 points. 

The first-place team along with 
the top five individuals in each event 
qualify for next Tuesday's Stevenson 



sectional. At-large berths, both team 
and individual, will be determined 
by the end of this week. 

"We had a couple of falls on the 
balance beam, but overall, I thought 
we did a really nice job tonight," said 
Bessette. 

Diemer became the school's first 
all-around sectional qualifier, finish- 
ing fifth with a cumulative score of 
34.90 (8.726 avg.). 

In her travels, she finished third 
in the bars (9.00), ninth in the vault 
(8.650) and floor exercise (8.60), and 
fifth in the beam (8.750). 

"She's had a great season," not- 
ed Bessette. "We're very excited to 
have the first all-arounder in the 
school's history going to sectionals." 

Diemer will be joined by Hack- 
ney, who qualified in the beam after 
tieing her teammate for fifth place 
with an 8.750. 

Hackney just missed qualifying 
as an all-arounder, finishing seventh 
with a total score of 32.325 (8.56 
avg.). 

The senior added an eighth- 
place effort in the bars (8.30) fol- 



lowed by 11th in the 8.450) and sixth 
in the floor exercise (8.750). 

Others contributing to the team 
score in eluded: Cemey, who finished 
10th in the all-around (32325); Gey- 
er, who was 13th in the all-around 
(29.00); and, Miedona, who earned 
\ 16tii in the all-around (27.850). 

, Cerney's top individual events 
were seventh in the- vault (8.875), 
10th in the bars (8.100), and 12th in 
the floor (8.150). 

Miedona was 12th in the bars 
(7.800) while Geyer's top effort was 
in the 14th In the vault (8.050). 

No doubt, these Sequoits are one 
of the up-and-coming teams in the 
area. 

"We have a different mixture of 
girls, from the experienced to girls 
who are in their first year out." said 
Bessette. 

"The level of experience doesn't 
matter because the work ethic is 
tremendous. They all are very dedi- 
cated and show up to practice and 
work very hard every day." 

And from the looks of it, she's 
right! 



Poor field-goal shooting continues to haunt Sequoits 



By JOHN PHELPS 
Sports Editor 



Consistency and poor field-goal 
shooting have been thorns in the An- 
tioch varsity boys basketball team's 
side thus far in the season. 

After posting a convincing 58-49 
victory in the North Suburban open- 
er some two months ago, the Zion- 
Benton Zee-Bees had a little revenge 



on their minds Friday night 

Well, it payed off for Zion to the 
tune of a 58-46 decision and lit was all 
because of defense. The loss the sixth 
consecutive in conference for Anti- 
och, which fell to 9-1 1 overall and 3- 
6 in league play. 

"They played a different defense 
as opposed to the first time we 
played-one that we weren't accus- 
tomed to," said head coach Jeff 



ATHLETES OF THE WEEK 

Name: Thor Swanson 

School: Antioch 

Sport: Wrestling 

Yean Sophomore 

Last week's stats: Wrestling at 152 pounds, 

earned his first conference title 

in last weekend's N SC meet 



Swanson Name: Jenna Diemer 

School: Antioch 

Sport: Gymnastics 

Yean Freshman 

Last week's stats: Became the first all-around 

qualifier in the school's history after placing fifth 

in the Libertyville regional Tuesday. 





""■JjiaHH 












,*JjLL*' r . '-9 






Diemer 



Dresser. "Give coach (Don Kloth) a 
lot of credit. Zion had a good game 
plan tonight." 

The defense Dresser is referring 
to is the triangle-and-two, which ba- 
sically saw Zion fall back off of the 
perimeter. 

"We expected more pressure 
from them," added Dresser. "But 
they have the team speed as to where 
they can play that way. We did have 
a lot of good looks but just couldn't 
get anything to fall." 

Antioch shot just 34 percent 
from the field for the game, much to 
the dismay of Dresser. 

"You're not going to win many 
games shooting like that," the coach 
said. "Our two main scorers (Don 
Lackey and Eric White) Were shut 
down,. forcing others to step it up. 
And that didn't happen." 

White led the hosts with a sub- 
par 11 point-effort while Lackey tal- 
lied eight. An Brown also experi- 
enced shooting woes, finishing with 
nine points and Brandon White 
chipped in with seven. 

Zion pretty much put the game out 
of reach after an 8-0 run in the second • 
quarter vaulted them to a 12-point lead 



as Antioch was never able to recover. 

"We weren't getting many sec- 
ond chances," noted Dresser. 

Incidentally, we'd like to wish 
guard Adam Durham a speedy re- 
covery. Durham had surgery 
Wednesday on his right shoulder, 
which he separated in the Rockford 
Christmas Tournament 

And, senior soccer star 
Matt Miclea was honored at halftime 
of the varsity game. Miclea, who 
played an instrumental role in the 
Sequoits 17-4-3 season, was named 
All-State and All-Midwest He broke 
eight school records, including goals 
scored for a single-season (32). 

"He's obviously a great athlete 
and has been a very improtant part of 
the program," said athletic director 
Steve Schoenfelder. "But even more of 
a testament to that is how much com- 
posure and character he displays." • 

Head coach Charlie Trout attest- 
ed. 

"He's definitely one of the best 
we've had here," the coach said. 
"He's the only one to be named All- 
Midwest, which basically boils down 
to he is one of the top 15 players in 
the state." 



A10 /Lakeland Newspapers 



SPORTS 



February 4, 2000 





(Stats, news and such from the world of colleges, high schools, youtlis, etc..) 



Boys basketball 
Saturday's results 
Non-conference 

Grant71, Union Grove (Wis.) 45 
Harvard 62, 62, Wauconda 60 (OT) . 
Friday's results 
Big Northern 

Johnsburg 63, Harvard 58 
ESCC 

Camiel48, St. Patrick 41 
Marist 46, Notre Dame 43 
St. Viator 79, Holy Cross 33 
Benet 49, Joliet Catholic 43 
. St. Joseph 62, Marian Catholic 56 (OT) 
Fox Valley 
Grayslake 78, C.L Central 65 



Cary-Grove 72, Jacobs 46 
Lake Zurich 62, Dundee-Crown 53 
■ Prairie Ridge 78, McHenry 63 
Woodstock 56, C.L South 51 (2 OT) 
North Suburban 
Mundelein 66, North Chicago 60 
Warren 65, Libertyville 53 
Zion-Benton 58, Antioch 46 
Stevenson 41, Lake Forest 34 
Non-conference 
Round Lake 42, Wauconda 38 

Girls basketball 
Monday's results 
Non-conference 

Schaumburg 51, Warren 39 



Saturday's results 
FoxValley . 

Grayslake 60, Prairie Ridge 41 
C.L Central 42, C.L South 38 
Dundee-Crown 50, Cary-Grove 42 
North Suburban ' 
Libertyville 47, Lake Forest 30 
Warren 50, Zion-Benton 41 
Mundelein 51, Antloch36 

BOYS AREA 
BASKETBAL L STANDINGS 
Overall 
Warren 13-5 

Grayslake 13-6 

Lake Zurich * 



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FILING STATUS 



END OF YEAR 

Your filing status depends on whether you are married or unmarried on 
December 31st of a tax year. If you live apart from your spouse and meet 
certain tests, you may be considered unmarried for the entire year. If you are 
divorced under a final decree by the last day of the year, you are considered 
unmarried for the entire year, 

ANNULLED MARRIAGES 

if you obtain an annulment that declares your marriage never existed, you are 
considered unmarried for this and any previous tax year. You must amend your 
tax returns for all the tax years not affected by the statute of limitations for 
filing a return to show this change in marital status. 

HEAD OF HOUSEHOLD 

Single or separated taxpayers should check to see if they qualify for head of 
household filing status. This filing status allows a taxpayer to take a higher 
standard deduction, possibly be eligible for a lower tax bracket and perhaps 
qualify for the earned income credit. 



Johnsburg 

Mundelein 

Antioch 

Carmel 

Libertyville 

Independents 

Grant 

Round Lake 

Wauconda 



12-8 
11-9 
8-11 
8-12 
6-13 

10-6 
5-13 
3-13 



GIRLS AREA 
BASKETBALL ST ANDINGS 
Overall 



Grayslake 

Libertyville 

Lake Zurich 

Johnsburg 

Carmel 

Mundelein 

Warren 

Antioch 

Independents 

Round Lake 

Wauconda 

Grant 



19-4 
18-5 
11-4 
10-6 
14-10 
10-10 
12-12 
6-17 

15-7 
11-9 
8-13 



Note: Records through Monday's 
games* 



ing 16 points and seven rebounds for 
Lake County, who fell, to 1-23 overall 
withofter the loss to Kishwaukee, 

Striker Chris Porter earned First 
Team All-Skyway and Second Team NJ- 
CAA Region IV honors as a member of the 
Lancer men's soccer team last fall. 

And, kudos to Athletic Director 
and head baseball coach Gene Han- 
son, who will be Inducted Into the Illinois 
High School Baseball Coaches this Satur- 
day. Hanson has coached CLC for 26 years 
and last spring won his 800th game! His 
career record currently stands at 011-320. 
During an illustrious career, Hanson has 
won two Region IV State tides to go along 
with numerous other coaching accolades. 
Hanson was Inducted Into the Junior Col- 
lege Athletic Hall of Fame back in 1996. 

Local Sports Digest 

The Lake County Bowling Asso- 
ciation Hall of Fame dinner will be 
held on Sunday, February 13 at Grand 
Palace Banquets Center in Gurnee. The 
LC.BA. will be honoring four Inductees; 
Robert Rosengren and Eugene Payne, Sr. 




Looks can be deceiving 

Undenhurst resident and Antioch High graduate Yvette Buj'ak was 
chosen as the Best Polish-American Athlete of the Chicagoland 
area for 1999, presented by the Polish-American Daily News. Bu- 
jak, an accomplished judo student, is from the Tohkan Judo Acad- 
emy. Bujak, 17, attends The College of Lake County. Above, she 
poses with coach Doug Tono, a fifth-degree black belt and Presi- 
dent of Chicago Judo Black Belt Association. He is also the head 
coach at Tohkan Judo Aeademy.-Subm/tted photo. 



Youth Beat 

Iceless Hockey Assocatlon- 
League standings 

W L T Pts 
Western Conference 
Grade 1-2 



Blackhawks 


2 








4 


Blues 


2 








4 


Hurricanes 


2 








4 


Vipers 
Panthers 


1 
1 


1 
1 






2 
2 


Maplcleafs 
Moose 






2 
2 










Redwings 
Pacific Division 





2 








Flames 


2 








4 


Coyotes 
Canucks 


2 
1 



1 






4 
2 


Sharks 


1 


1 





2 


Ducks 


1 


1 





2 


Avalanche 


1 


1 


' 


2 


Kings 
Oilers 






2 
2 











College Sports Beat ■ 

Angle Pederson, a Junior at The 
University of Wisconsin-Whitewater and 
resident of Antioch, was the Warhawks' 
top finisher on the balance beam (9.275) 
in the North Illinois University gymnas- 
tics quad over the weekend. 

The College of Lake County 
women's basketball team improved 
to 0- 14 overall and 4 -3 In the Skyway Con- 
ference following a 59-45 victory over 
Oaktori last Thursday, Jessica Gutierrez 
poured In 16 points, Krlssy Schultzc 14, 
and AJa Brown 14. 

Aaron Coleman pumped In 28 
points and grabbed 12 rebounds but the 
College of Lake County men's basketball 
team fell to Kishwaukee 77-53. Coleman 
shot 58 percent from the field in averag- 
ing nearly 27 points per game last week. 
Coleman, who also averaged eight re- 
bounds per contest last week, is averag- 



for meritorious services, and Ron Axberg 
and Pat Cornell for performance. Tickets 
are $25 per person. Please contact Tom 
Bertrand, either by email at 
Tbertl75D5@aol.com; by fax at (847) 855- 
77879, or by mail at Lake County Bowling 
Association, Hall of Fame Co mm i ttec, c/o 
Tom Bertrand, P.O. Box 652, Gumee, IL, 
60031 . Cocktail hour for the event will be 
from 5-6 p.m., followed by dinner at 6 
p.m., which will be followed Immediate- 
ly by induction ceremonies. 

The Undenhurst Fastpltch Soft- 
ball team is still looking for 14 -and -un- 
der players for the upcoming season. 
Note: Players are still eligible If their 15th 
birthday falls after January 1. 

Contact directors Steve Haenchen 
(265-0749) or Mitch Kotlarz (356-9547) or 
manager Jim Kulakowskl (265-0222) for 
further details. 

Team practices are presently held 
every Saturdayfrom 1 a.m.-3 p.m. at B.J, 
Hooper School off Sand Lake Rd. in Un- 
denhurst. 

An ASEP Coaches clinic will be 
held in Rockford this Saturday for anyone 
interested in becoming certified to coach 
middle or high school athletics. The suc- 
cessful completion o f the ASEP leader lev- 
el program Is required by the Illinois H igh 
School Associations for all non-faculty 
coaches. To register or for more informa- 
tion about this or future clinics Instructor 
Jeff Kyle at (217) 586-4799. 

Lake County Baseball Is looking 
for teams to form a new spring league for 
the 2000 baseball season. The league wiD 
be nationally franchised under NBC (Na- 
tional Baseball Congress) and playing In 
the league will lead to national competi- 
tion In the NBC World Series. 

Anycoachormonagerofa 10,11, 12, 
13, 14, 15 or 15-year-old team that would 
like more information on this new league 
should contact Lake County Baseball at 
945-9606. 



February 4, 2000 








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PICTURES 



1 



..■.«.■ i i ' ' i • 



A1 2 /Lakeland Newspapers 



COMMUNITY 



February 4, 2000 



'-., 



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XI 



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Lake Villa 
Township Baseball 

APPLICATIONS STILL BEING TAKEN 

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1 \ X, \ « J • -. ' • 



LIFE'S ABEAR 

Dot com irritations / B2 



MOVIE REVIEW 

'Angela's Ashes' has 
no silver lining /B5 



PARENTS PLACE 

Children copying parents 
isn't always best / B10 



-^;. v- -■*-:' ~ 



rm 



OUI 
SECTION 



Section 








Many find home 
merchandise events 

to be good time, 
rewarding experience 



rom Tupperware to lingerie, you 
can buy a lot these days without 
ven leaving your home — and 
without using the Internet. 
Home parties are more 
prevalent than ever it seems. Why 
do people choose this method of 
shopping over a store? What 

ByMCHEIXEHABRYCH 
Assistant Editor 



would compel someone to invite 
over a bunch of friends and co- 
workers to their home to look at 
crystal? Is there more to these 
parties than meets the eye? 

Nancy Drabek co-hosted a 
Princess House home party in 
January with her friend Gail 
Smith. "When I went to the party 
(at an acquaintance's home}, I re- 
alized that I like the product so 
well," explained Drabek. 

After the Princess House con- 
sultant, Stacy Mariano, explained 
the hostess benefits, Drabek sug- 
gested to Smith that die two 
should host a party of their own. 

At the party, the women were 
given crystal necklace thank-you 
gifts by Mariano that they can 
add to as their friends book par- 
ties. Drabek was confident that 
there would be bookings at her 



party. "It's a nice product, that's 
.why you can book it," she said. 

One incentive to host a home 
party is that the consultant usual- 
ly offers special prices on the 
merchandise for the hostess, as 
well as exclusive merchandise 
only available to those who host 
a party. Many of the women at 
the party in Drabek's Fox Lake 
home had their eyes on the 
Princess Heritage Deluxe Cake 
Plate, which was only available to 
hostesses who made three or 
more bookings during their own 
party. 

Julie Davis of Lakemoor was 
at Drabek's party because the 
party was booked off of Davis* 
party last year. For attending the 
party at Drabek's, Davis received 
some crystal beads to add to her 
hostess necklace. 

When asked why she had her 
party, Davis said, "In the first 
place, it was a good way to intro- 
duce myself to the neighbor- 
hood." ; 

She added that the discount- 
ed and free product was also an 
incentive for her to host the party 
in her home. 

"It's cool stuff," Davis said of 
the Princess House merchandise, 
"stuff that you can use. It's pretty 
versatile." 



Many of the home party busi- 
nesses offer quality products that 
are difficult to find anywhere else, 
with guarantees unlike any store, 

Mike Thielsen of McHenry 
attended Drabek's party because 
co-host Smith is his sister, "I've 
been wanting to buy crystal wine 
glasses, so I was able to get them 
[at the party)." 

Heather Ward of Tinley Park 
is planning a PartyLite candle 
party, "because it's stuff you can't 
get in the stores, it's high quality 
and you can get deals." Ward said 
she wants to see the new catalog 
offerings. 

Also at the parties, consul- 
tants give tips on use of the prod- 
ucts, as well as cleaning and stor- 
age advice. This is one benefit of 
buying at a home party that you 
won't find in many stores. 

PartyLite consultant Melissa 
Erickson of Deeriield shares 
many tips at her candle parties. 

Please see PARTY IB2 










Gumee resident Fran Ehredt, above, talks with Janett Jennings of 
Fox Lake, holding a Princess House ceramic bowl, during a Princess 
House Crystal Demonstration at the home of Nancy Drabek in Fox 
Lake .Top photo: an advantage to in-home parties is that the mer- 
chandise can be viewed in person. — Photo by Candace H. Johnson. 




CRITICS CHOICE 



'Moon for the Misbegotten' 
a shining O'Neill revival 



Alcoholism, promiscuity and are recurrent themes in 
the works of Eugene O'Neill, and he touches them 
all in his final, masterful play, "A Moon for the Mis- 
begotten." 
The bittersweet drama, under Daniel Sullivan's exacting 
direction, fares well in a strong revival at Chicago's Goodman 
Theatre ahead of its Broadway run in march. It doesn't hurt 
that he has rounded up three very strong leads: Gabriel Byrne, 
Cherry Jones and Ray Dotrice, 



s. 




"Moon for the Misbegotten" performances run through 
Feb. 19 at the Goodman TheatreColumbus Drive, 
Chicago. For more Information please call 312-443- 
3800. 



_ let in 1923, the story, in simplest terms, captures Phil 
Hogan, a cantankerous, scheming Connecticut pig farmer as 
he plots to retain the land he has leased for two decades from 
the Tyrone family. He enlists his outspoken daughter Josie to 
set a trap to seduce James Tyrone Jr., a man broken by alcohol 
and drowning In grief over the cherished mother he lost. 



\_J 'NeiU's characterization runs deep, entwined with 
rich poetic prose. And we find that Tyrone (Byrne, in a 
stunning performance) is not only besotted with booze — 
but with certain romantic feelings for Josie (Jones), who, 
despite the shady reputation she has cultivated} is full of 
nurturing love for Tyrone. Dotrice is feisty and slick as the 
aging father. 

And Jones and Byrne soar in a magnificent cathartic 
moonlit scene in which their characters each share their in- 
nermost secrets, however late in the game. 

Set designer Eugene Lee's ramshackle farmhouse, rest- 
ing next to oversized boulder, effectively sets the hard- 
scrabble tone. 

See "A Moon for the Misbegotten" through Feb. 19. 
Ticket information is available at 312/443-3800,— By Tom 
Witom^ 



' M < > < ', 1 l t < l L I I ) ' < 1 ( i i i ,1 I I ( I I < t I < 



I i I i t t t » I I t ( 1 I » ' * i t • i j j j I j ,; ^ , 



>>.VI)Mi<U 



1 i 



B2/ Lakeland Newspapers 



FOR YOUR ENTERTAINMENT 



February 4, 2000 



If 21st century is a dot come-on, he's not c 



Mr. Bear was grumpy. 
"I don't think I'm go- 
ing to like mis 21 st cen- 
tury," he growled at the 
end of last Sunday's Super Bowl 
telecast. "Because if I hear ONE 
MORE commercial say the words 
"dot com" ...I'M GOING TO (exple- 
tives deleted)!!?' 

Yes, folks, Mr. Bear, also known 
as my hubby, had gotten a little 
worked up, and it sure wasn't about 
the game. After all, up until the 
fourth quarter, the action in this lat- 
est Super Bowl could have been 
compared to the excitement you 
might experience at a turtle race 
sponsored by the makers of Valium. 
If it weren't for the tight ends, I 
know I'd have been snoring. And 
despite Mr. Bear's love of football, 
having played it himself back in his 
glory days in high school and col- 
lege, this Super Bowl had nearly sent 
even him into hibernation. 

But those darn dot com-mer- 
cials. . .now there was something 
that really made him sit up and roar, 
especially during half-time. "DOT 




LIFE'S 
h A BEAR 

Donna Abear 



COM THIS! DOT COM THAT! 
WHAT IS WITH ALL THIS (expletive 
deleted) DOT COM (expletive delet- 
ed)\ GRRRRRRRR!" 

Now, don't fret, people. The 
kids were out of earshot. And it was- 
n't as though he has never seen any 
dot com-mercials— he's done his 
share of growling about them be- 
fore. However, I don't think we TV 
viewers have ever been subjected to 
as many of those types of ads in as 
short a time period as we were dur- 
ing the Super Bowl. In football . 
terms, it was a "dot com-ikaze blitz." 

And to make it worse, not only 
were those ads about dot com-pa- 
nies most of us have never heard of, 
they were apparently created by ad 
people whose brains are dot com- 



atose; Why? Because the majority of 
the dot come-ons aired that night 
were neither informative nor even 
dot com-ical. They were pretty dot- 
dumb, for lack of another irritating 
dot com-bination. 

In other wordsi where is a good 
old talking beer lizard when you 
need one? 

You see, grumpy or not; my 
husband had a point. But like any 
good spouse, I didn't tell HIM that. 
I didn't want those stupid ads to 
ruin the progress I'd been making 
with him. Why, just last week, he 
had actually surfed the Internet for 
the first time alone. Of course, he 
got lost because he didn't know 
how to click on the "back" button, 
but it was still progress. Not only 
that, he had even become the 
proud owner of his own e-mail ad- 
dress and e-mail box, which was 
already filling up on a daily basis 
with porno messages from people 
he'd never met. 

Hey— there's a drawback to 
everything. (Or riot, depending on 
your point of view.) 



FROM PAGE Bl 



PARTY 



"It's important because a lot of peo- 
ple really don't know how to take 
care of their candles," she explained. 
She also tries to share creative ideas 
that people may not have thought of 
before. 

Christine Span of Round Lake 
Beach said, "The tips help every- 
body save time in the kitchen, and 
that's the whole basis of Pampered 
Chef, to help you save time and 
money." 



A consultant for Pampered 
Chef, Span pointed out that time is 
the one thing that cannot be bought, 
so she shares tips at her home 
kitchen shows that advise guests on 
how to get through a dinner party, 
how to utilize kitchen tools for more 
than one use, and how to save mon- 
ey and time through investment 
cooking. "I share tips because peo- 
ple like to hear the easier way and 
the quicker way to do something," 




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she said. 

* In the end, the one thing every- 
one seemed to agree on was that the 
home party is a good excuse to get 
together. 

"It's a girls' night out," com- 
mented Sue Stark of Bloomingdale, 
who attended Drabek's party. 

Fran Ehredt of Gumee agreed, 
"That's the whole concept, getting 
out and socializing without chil- 
dren." 

Ehredt said, "I think I've been to 
every possible home party in the 
past 15 years. I enjoy going to 
them." 

"My husband had plans and I 
didn't.so I came," Ward explained. 
"I had nothing to do [on this Satur- 
day night]." 

When Erickson first hosted a 
PartyLite parly, before she became a 
consultant, she did it for the social 
aspect. "It's a great reason to get a 
whole bunch of your friends togeth- 
er in one room and chit-chat," she 
explained. She sees selling the can- 
dles as an added bonus to the fun 
she has at the parties. 

Erickson recently had a party 
where her hostess purposely invited 
her neighbors that she did not 
know. "She called it a 'Get to Know 
Your Neighbor' party," said Erick- 
son. 

And many of them are definitely 
parties. Drabek's party showcased 
the Princess House margarita glass- 
es, with guests enjoying several 
pitchers of the drink along with tor- 
tilla chips and other snacks. Pam- 
pered Chef shows demonstrate the 
kitchen tools by preparing a deli- 
cious dish for all to enjoy. 

Whether it's the free merchan- 
dise, the party atmosphere or the 
cooking tips, the popularity of the 
home party continues to grow. This 
opportunity to spend time with 
neighbors and friends offers a per- 
sonal touch to catalog shopping as 
well as a fun night out. 



Join the Solo 
Singles at Gale 
Street Inn 

Solo Singles Group (40+) meets 
every Friday evening at 8 p.m. at the 
Gale Street Inn on Diamond Lake 
Rd. in Mundelein for dancing and 
socializing. 

For more information please 
call the hot line at 746-6818. 



I suppose I could have just left 
him behind in the 20 tn century, 
grumbling about the way things 
"used to be." But I figured he Was 
only grumbling because it was 
strange to him, just the way I would 
grumble if he handed me a tool belt 
and a hammer and told me to build 
a wall. So I'd been pulling him along 
slowly, trying to get him to take baby 
steps in the world that goes by the . 
address "dot com." 

That is, until the dam "Dot 
Com Bowl" sent him into dot com- 
bat. 

"DOT COM! DOT COM! GR- 
RRRRRR!" growled Mr. Bear. 

Now, in order to keep him from 
regressing to his pre-computerized 
state, I was forced to defend all 
those stupid dot com-mercials. 

"Oh, c'mon, honey. Get with it. 
They're just names, no different 
than Nike or Budweiser." 

"No they're NOT like Nike or 
Budweiser. They all sound the 
same. . .DOT COM. DOT COM. DOT 
COM.GRRRRRR!" 

This was not going to be easy. 




. "Listen, you can't live in the 
past. You sound like your Mom. 
She's still mad about Pearl Harbor." 

He just looked at me and 
growled. 

The next morning, he was out- 
side warming up his truck. Sudden- 
ly, he popped his head inside the 
back door. 

"Hah! Guess what? I just heard 
John Records Laridecker on the ra- 
dio complaining about the stupid 
dot com stuff. See? I'm not the only 
one." 

"Okay, that makes two of you," 
I told him. "You and John Landecker 
on the OLDIES station. Two oldies 
grumbling about dot corns. Face 
it-the world is changing whether 
you like it or not." 

"GRRRRRR!" 

I'm guessing that means "not." 



Questions or comments for 
Donna Abear can be sent to: P.O. Box 
391, Antioch, IL 60002, or by e-mail: 
donna@lifesabear.com. Also, be sure 
to check out her new web site at 
http'JIwwiu, lifesabear.com. 




Left to right, Rob Findlay as Picasso and John Franco as Einstein' 
rehearse for PM&L's "Picasso at the Lapln Agile" to open on Feb. 
4th 

PM & L Theater presents 'Picasso' 



Audiences can meet Pablo Pi- 
casso and Albert Einstein as young 
men at the PM & L Theatre, 877 
Main St., Antioch, when they come 
to see "Picasso at the Lapin Angle" 
on Feb. 4-5, 11-12, 18-19 at 8:00 
p.m. or Feb. 6, 13 or20 at 2:30 p.m.. 
Ken Smouse from Antioch directs 
this comedy by Steve Martin. 

Reservations can be made by 
calling 395-3055 or by coming to the 
box office. Box office hours are 
Monday - Thursday, 5:30 - 7:30 
p.m., Saturday 11 a.m.- 2 p.m., and 
1 1/2 hours before curtain time on 
play dates. Tickets are $10 for adults 
and $8 for students and seniors. 

In the fall of 1993, a production 
of Steve Martin's first original play, a 
comedy drama called "Picasso at 
the Lapin Agile" was presented by 
Chicago's prestigious Steppenwolf 
Theatre, where it inaugerated the 



facility's new third floor Studio The-, 
atre. Following rave reviews and ex- 
tended runs in Chicago, the play 
was presented successfully in 
Boston and Los Angles and played 
off Broadway in New York at the 
Promenade Theatre to critical and 
audience acclaim. 

Rob Findlay from Antioch and 
John Franco from Mundelein play 
the two leading roles. Supporting 
cast members are Fran Jansta, Tom 
Hausman,-Jackie Bigalke and Regi- 
na Reynolds from Antioch, Mary 
Campbell from Ingleside, Darren 
Walsh from Woodstock, Terry 
O'Brien from Lake Villa, Courtney 
Podraza from Crystal Lake and 
Kenelm Scheske from Salem, WI. 

"Picasso at the Lapin Agile" Is 
not a play that young children will 
understand or appreciate. PM & L is 
labeling it as PG 13. 



Valentine art class offered by art center 



A Valentine Art Class will be of- 
fered by the Anderson Arts Center 
on Saturday, Feb. 12 from 10 a.m. to 
Noon. 

The Valentine Art Class will be . 
taught by artist Katie Sciarra and is 
designed for children between the 
ages of 8-12. Class participants will 
make a candy Valentine pop-up 
and a fabric heart pouch'to wear or 
to hang for display. The class will 
be held in the Faulkner Building lo- 
cated at Kemper Center, 6501-3rd 
Ave., Kenosha, WI. 

The fee for the Valentine Art 
Class is $20 per child which in- 



cludes all supplies. The class size is 
limited to just 10 students, To reg- 
ister, call the office at Kemper Cen- 
ter at (262) 657-6005 during regular 
business hours. 

The Valentine Art Class is the 
first in a series of art classes for 
children planned for 
Winter/Spring 2000 at the Ander- 
son Arts Center. 

An informational flyer, listing 
all classes, their descriptions, class 
fees, registration deadlines and oth- 
er general information, is available 
now by calling the Anderson Arts 
Center at 262 653-0481. 



Are You Looking For Something To Do? 

See Lakelife In Section B Every Week 






mt*m+m-*i**^i*m'» 



, ,'f'A ••■ 



B3/ Lakeland Newspapers 



FOR YOUR ENTERTAINMENT 



February 4] 2000 



ter 



is the 
is for 

Ander- 



l 



SPECIAL EVENTS 

Rock W Jock 2000 
raise funds for United Way 

Join 95 WIIL's John Perry at the third Rock 'N' Jock celebrity 
hockey event on Feb. 12 at Rink Side Sports, Gumee Mills, 6152 
W. Grand Ave.; Gurnee and help the United Way of Lake County, 
'write happy endings." This special event will feature two teams 
of celebrities Including the infamous Hanson Brothers from the 
movie "Slapshot," Chicago Blackhawk alumnus Cliff Koroll, Grant 
Mulvey, Reg Kerr and Peter Marsh, as well as former Milwaukee Ad- 
mirals Fred Berry, Eves Preston, Danny Lacoures and Peter Bacovik. 
If s fun for the whole family. The fun begins at 5 p.m. and will be fol- 
lowed by an auction in Rink Side Sports party room, featuring such 
items as autographed jerseys, hockey sticks, an optical package from 
Pearl Vision in Lake County, tooth whitening form Dr. Gary Kaplan 
(Gurnee Dental Care) dinners form Rainforest Cafe in Gurnee Mills, 
dinners from Max & Erma's and the Outback Steakhouse to name a 
few. Tickets are available at Rink Side Sports for $15. 
For further information call 856-1064, ext. 221. 





at Museum 



They saw it for the last time on that tragic night in April 1912. 
On Feb, 18, you can see It for the first time when the Muse- 
um of Science and Industry, Chicago, with RMS Titanic Inc. 
and SEX Family Entertainment, launch a one-of-a-kind Ti- 
tanic exhibition. 

More than 200 artifacts from the Titanic's wreckage are featured 
in the exhibit, including a selection of White Star Line dishware, a 
handwritten letter and one of the ship's portholes. The largest piece 
on display is'a 13-ton portion of the Titanic's hull. Measuring 13 by 20 
feet, it is the largest piece of Titanic that will, in all likelihood, ever be 
recovered from the wreckage. 

, Guests can relive the history and drama of Titanic by viewing 
recreated rooms on board the ship including the grand staircase, an 
elegant first-class cabin, a third-class cabin and the engine room. 
Memorable stories are told as guests encounter the memorial section 
and learn the fate of passengers and crew or place their hands on a gi- 
ant wall of ice— four degrees warmer than the Atlantic Ocean that . 
cold April night 

The Museum of Science and Industry will display Titanic: The Ex- 
hibition from Feb. 18 to Sept 4. For more information or to purchase 
advanced tickets call 773-684-1414, Ext. 2500. 



HOROSCOPE 



Aries- March 21/Aprll 20 
Don't get caught up in the moment 
when reminiscing with an acquain- 
tance. He or she Is trying to distract . 
you from something important. Pay at- 
tention to what's going on^ That spe- 
cial someone asks for your advice. Be 
honest with him or her — even if what 
you have to say won't be appreciated. 
Gemini plays a key role. 
Taurus - April 21/May 21 
Try to keep your temper under control 
when having a discussion with a close 
friend. He or she Isn't ready to hear 
your opinion. Therefore, don't give it. 
Speaking your mind only will cause 
friction between the two of you. A 
loved one offers you some romantic 
advice. Take it 
Gemini - may 22/June 21 
Take your time when It comes to fin- 
ishing an Important project this week. 
A lot of people are counting on you to 
do this right. So, don't rush through it, 
and be sure to check your work. Your 
diligence will be rewarded. A close 
friend takes you out late in the week. 
Enjoy yourself) 
Cancer - June 22/July 22 
You're in for a big change this week, 
Cancer. Don't be nervous; this Is 
something that you've been wanting to 
happen. Share your excitement with 
those closest to you. An acquaintance 
asks to speak with you. Say yes, be- 
cause he or she really needs someone 
to talk with. Sagittarius plays an impor- 
tant role on Thursday. 
Leo - July 23/August 23 
When It comes to your career, don't be 
afraid to ask the hlgher-ups for some- 
thing that you really need. Just stay 
calm, and present your case logically. 
If you can do this, they're sure to be on 
your side. You meet someone Interest- 
ing late In the week. Get to know him 
or her better, because this could be 
the one. 

Virgo- Aug 24/Sept 22 
Don't worry about a loved one who 
gets Into trouble early in the week, Vir- 
go. This person needs to handle the 
situation on his or her own. The per- 
son whom you've been seeing wants 
to intensify your relationship. Before, 
saying yes, think about what you really 
want, this may not be it. 
Ubra - Sept 23/Oct 23 
Don't let an argument with an acquain- 
tance spoil your good mood this week, 



Ubra. He or she is trying to get you 
upset. Don't let that happen. Just try 
to Ignore this person. A loved one 
asks you for advice about a personal 
matter. Be honest. 
Scorpio - Oct 24/Nov 22 
Try to be more attentive to a loved 
one this week, Scorpio. He or she Is 
going through a difficult lime and 
needs someone to talk to. Be there for 
him or her. Your efforts wilt be appre- 
ciated. A business acquaintance 
wants to get to know you better. Don't 
get involved with this person, because 
he or she has an ulterior motive. 
Sagittarius - Nov 23/Dec 21 
You get blamed for a problem at work. 
Instead of getting upset and going on 
the defensive, Just help to rectify the 
situation. The hlgher-ups know the 
truth and won't reprimand you for 
something that you didn't do. A close 
friend reveals his or her true feelings 
for you. Let this person know how you 
really feel, too. 



ART 



All the Pretty Houses 

Highland Park artist Carol Pearl- - " 
man will exhibit her water color scries 
on fantasy houses at the Northbrook 
Public Library now mrough February 12 
on the third floor. 

Pearlmah's series "All the Pretty 
Houses" expresses the artist's response 
to life experiences, plain and ordinary, 
in the form of fantasy villages, row hous- 
es, and other dwellings. 

Gallery hours are Monday-through 
Saturday 9 a.m.-5 p.m. For more Infor- 
mation call (847) 432-1888. 



THEATRE 



Bo wen Park Theatre, 
'Broken Glass' 

Bowen Park Theatre begins 2000 
with Arthur Miller's Broken Glass. Cen- 
tering around a Brookland housewife 
who is mysteriously paralyzed from the 
waist down an d obsessed by a newsp a- 
per photo of two elderly Jews forced by 
Nazi's to scrub' a street with a tooth- 
brush. Set in the 1930's, Miller's spiritual 
detective story probes the troubled lives 
and marriage and sexual awakening of 
the Gellburg family. 

Performances are Friday, Feb. 4-5, 
1 1-12 at 8 p.m. and Feb. 6 and 13 at 2 
xm. Broken Glass Is not recommended 
or young audiences. Performances will 
>e In Goodfellow Hall in the lack Benny 
Center for the Arts, Bowen Park, 39 Jack 
Benny Dr., Waukegan. For reservations 
call the Jack Benny Center for the Arts at 
360-4741, or online at 
www.ticketweb.com 



SINGLES 



St. Peter's Singles 
Club, Catholics over 45 

All singles or widowed over 4 5 invit- 
ed to these dances, Friday Feb. 4, Gold- 
en Flame, 6417 Higgins Chicago, and 
Saturday, Feb. 5 Berwyn VFW, 16th and 
Harlem, Berwyn. 

Both dances start at 8:45 pjn., and 
the cost is $7. This Is a live band, coat 
and tie required. 






Capricorn - Dec 22/Jan 20 
You have a lot to do this week, Capri- 
corn. So, try not to let others distract 
you. Stay focused, and work diligent- 
ly. That's the only way to get things 
done. Don't worry — you'll have plen- 
ty of time to relax and enjoy yourself 
this weekend. Cancer plays a key role 
on Wednesday. 
Aquarius - Jan 21/Feb 18 
Don't bite off more than you can chew 
early in the week. You already have 
several things that you need to get 
done. Don't take on more responsibili- 
ty. A loved one needs your help with a 
family matter this weekend. Do what 
you can for him or her. 
Places - Feb 19/March 20 
Go after what you want this week, 
Pisces. If you don't, you'll never get It, 
because no one is going to give It to 
you. Don't be nervous; you deserve 
this. A good friend turns to you for 
help. Be there for him or her. Leo 
plays an Important role. 



\\<2>J/ Presents, 

f^ Ste ve Martin 's 

Picasso at the 
Lapin Agile 

February 4 & 5, 11 & 12, 16 & 19 at 8 p.m. 
February 6, 13 & 20, at 2:30 p.m. 

Frl. & Sot, a p.m.; Sunday Matinee 2:30 p.m. 
Adults $10; Students & Seniors $8 

Call for Reservations 

395-3055 

PM&LTheatre • 877 Main St., Antioch 

Box Office Hours: Mon. Ihru Thurs. 5:30-7:30 p.m.; Sat. 11-2 
1 1/2 firs, before showllmo. Reserved Sealing. VtSA/MC 



FUNDRAISER 

Public Events at 
Marytown 

On Feb. 4 and 5, a healing weekend 
retreat, 6 p.m. to 6 a.ni The Twelve 
Steps: A Journey from Brokeness to 
Healing. Director Fr. Patrick Stoffer, 
OFM CONV., explores the healing spiri- 
tuality of the twelve-step recovery pro- 
gram. Ideal for recovering alcoholics, 
addicts and those with codependency 
issues, the weekend retreat Is $95 for a 
double occupancy, $125 for single occu-; 
pancy, and $50 for commuters. 

For more information please call 
367-7BO0. 

Benefit for 
MargaretAnn T s Place 

April 16 spend the day with the 
Chenille Sisters. Back by popular de- 
mand, the Chenille's will be preforming 
a two -conceit series to benefit Margare- 
tAnh's Place, a center for grieving chil- 
dren, teens and families. 

Tickets for the 1 p.m. children's 
conceit are $10. The adult concert is 
scheduled for 7 p.m. Tickets for this 
concert are $15, Ail tickets are for gener- 
al seating. The concerts will be per- 
formed at Tremper High School, 
Kenosha, WI. 

For further information please call 
262-656-9656. 



KIDS STUFF 



Orphans in the Attic 
Doll-Toy-Bear show 

1 On Sunday, Jan. 30, from 10 am. -3 
p.m., Orphans In the Attic will hold their 
year 2000 Dol 1 -Toy- B e ar Show & Sale. 
Admission is $3.50 for adults and 
$1.50 children 6- 12 years old. The show 
will be held at Serb Hail, 5101 W. Okla- 
homa Ave., Milwaukee, WI. 

For more information contact 
Marge Hansen N96W20235 County Line 
RcL Menomonee Falls, WI. 53051. Marge 
Hansen can be reached via phone at 
262-255-4465, via fax 262-255-5884 or 
viawebsitedoIlbear@execpc.com. 

Anderson Art Center 
offers classes 

The Andrerson Arts Center's Kid's 



Space,- 124 66th St. Kenosha. WI., will be 
the site for a series of art classes for chil- 
dren this winter. Classes will be held on 
SaL,Feb,I2-Aprill5, 

Children may sign up for any or all 
of the classes offered. Class sizes are 
very limited. An Informational flyer, list- 
ing all classes, their descriptions, class 
fees, registration deadlines and other 
general information, Is available now by 
calling the Anderson Arts Center at (262) 
653-0481.- 

Performance 
opportunities for youths 

Kids Play is in its second successful . 
. year and will conduct its spring session 
from Feb 5 -April 8. Students eight to 
fourteen-yeais-oid will learn acting 
techniques, theatre performance skills 
and have the opportunity to participate 
in a theatre production.; Some of the stu- 
dents have gone on to community and* 
professional theatre. Auditions for Kids 
Play will take place on Sunday, Feb. 6, .. 
from 2-5 p.m; at Bowen Park's Goodfel- 
low Hall , 39 Jack Benny Dr., Waukegan. 
For more information call 360-4740. 



WANTED 



Original Scripts sought 

Bowen Park Theatre is currently 
seeking original scripts for their theatre 
for Young Audiences series. 

Scripts should be non-musical, 
original scripts targeted for young audi- 
ences (K-4) using an adult cast no larger 
than 6. Running time of script should at 
50-words-per-minute. 

Send all material to Bowen Park 
Theatre, Jack Benny Center for the Arts, 
TYA Script Search, 39 Jack 
Benny Dr., Waukegan 60087. Please in- 
clude a self- addressed stamped enve- 
lope If you would like the material back 

For more information, please con- 
tact Rick Covalinski, Performance Su- 
pervisor at 360-474 1 . 

Crafters wanted 

C rafters wanted for an art & craft 
fair to be held Feb. 12-13 at Porter 
County Expo in Valparaiso, In., and on 
March 25-26 at College of DuPage, Glen 
Ellyn. For more information, please con- 
tact Karen Yackley at 17957 2900 E. SL, 

Continued on next page 




26-30 ALLSTATE ARENA 
FEB. 1-13 UNITED CENTER 

ir /jj*iM7wj^ outlets 



DY PHONE: 

(312)559-1212- 



wwvv.tickelmaster.com 



INFORMATION: (847) 635-6601 Roswtiont • (312) 455-4500 Chicago 
GROUPS: (847) 671-9800 Roscmont • (312) 455-SHOW Chicago 

TICKET PRICES STARTING AT $9.75 

{service charges and handling f ee* may apply) 

Join u« at www.Dl5neyOn1ce.com 






February 4, 2000 



FOR YOUR ENTERTAINMENT 



Lakeland New$papers/BA 



Contin uedfrom preceding page 
Princeton, 61356 or call (815)643-2723. 


Techniques, offered on Tuesday, Feb. 8 
at the Leisure Center. Participants, ages 
12+, will discover new lures and old fish- 
ing tricks, offered by a fishing pro. The 


FAMILY FUN 


seminar begins at 7 p.m. at 3323 Walters 
Ave. There is no fee for youngsters un- 
der 18 years of age, with adult residents 


Have breakfast 
with the belugas 

Imagine being a beluga whale and 
watch the underwater world come to 


paying only $3 to attend, An additional 
advanced techniques class will be held 
on Tuesday, Feb. 15. To register for ei- 
ther of these fishing classes, please call 
291-2980. 


life each day! Mark your calendars for 
Feb. 19 and 26, when you andyour fam- 
ily are invited to Shedd Aquarium for 


CRAFTS 


the "Breakfast with the Animals" pro- 
gram. There's no better way to start 
your children's winter weekends than to 
marvel at the incredible buluga whales 
residing at Shedd. 

Tickets are $25 for children ages 3- 
1 1 and seniors; $28 for adults. Children 
ages 2 and under free. Reservations arc 
required, so please call in advance at 
(31 2)692-3333 for more Information 


Cultural community 
hosts arts festival 

Around The Coyote will celebrate 
the new century and millennium with a 
Winter Festival. Unlike the fall festival 
that spans throughout the whole Buck- 
town/ Wicker Park neighborhood of 
Chicago. The Winter Festival will focus 
on two historic buildings: The North- 
west Tower, a.ka. The Coyote Tower, 


WORKSHOP 


and The Flat Iran Arts Building. 

The festival runs, Feb. 5, 5-11 p.m., 
Feb. 6, 11 a.m. to 11 p.m., Feb. 7, 11 a.m. 
to 5 p.m. 

For additional information, please 
call 773-342-6777. 


Tai Chi Chih 
classes offered 


Tills class will introduce the stu- 
dent to this easy to learn discipline. T'ai 
Chi Chih consists of 19 flowing move- 
ments and one pose, which will en- 
hance the flow of energy in the body. 
Sally McLaughlin, an accredited T'ai Chi 
Chih instructor, will teach this soft, con- 
tinuous movement that requires little 
effort on Wednesdays until March 22 
from 1:30-2:45 p.m. in the Jack Benny 
Center for the Arts Dance Studio located 
in Bowen Park. Tills is not a form of 
martial arts, but a moving meditative 
form. No physical contact is made in 
the practice of T'ai Chi Chih. The fee for 
residents Is $62 and $67 for non-resi- 
dents. Registration is accepted at Jack 
Benny Center for the Arts located in 
Bowen Park, 39 Jack Benny Dr., 
Waukegan or by calling 360-4740. 

Park Dist. hosts game 
fishing seminar 

Spring really isn't far away when 
you think 'Fishing.' Take a Northbrook 
Park District seminar on Game Fishing 


CLUB MEETING 

Genealogical Society 
to meet 

The DuPage County Genealogical Soci- 
ety will host its 25th annual conference 
on Saturday, Feb. 26. With a focus on 
helping genealogists move "Forward Into 
the Past," the all-day conference will fea- 
ture 12 sessions in three tracks. These 
sessions will focus on resource utiliza- 
tion, skill Improvement and use of tech- 
nology in genealogy. One track of pro- 
grams will focus on the New England re- • 
gion. 

The conference will be at the Hilton 
Hotel- Usle/Napervillc. Registration and 
vendor availability begins at 8 a.m. Pro- 
gram sessions will last until 4 p.m. Early 
registration ends Feb. 1 1. Information 
on the program and registration details 
can be found at the society web site- 
www.dcgs.org or by contacting Nancy 
Houston at 90 Midhurst Court, No.lOlA, 
Napcrville; (630) 548-9095. 



4th Annual 



Business Expo 
Trade Shaw 



Antioch Community High School 

March 25 & 26 

Exhibitor Registration 
Space Is Limited 



Self your product! 
Demonstrate your 
W1^B§!& product! ' . 

Free Trip to 
j las Vegas 
given away each day! 



For more information, 

please call the 

Antioch Chamber of Commerce 

at (847) 395-2233. 

Kf& ... 

Register Today I 

Sponsored by Antioch Chamber 
Co-sponsored by Lakeland Newspapers 



■ TuaUelaiid 

NewsiiirpL'rs. 
Your leader In Community News' 




AUDITIONS 



PM&L Audition Notice 

Auditions for 'The Miracle Worker" 
by William Gibson will be held at the 
PM&L Theatre, 877 Main St., Antioch on 
Feb. 13-14 at 7 p.m. 

There arc rotes for 2 children, one 
girl and one boy, minimum age of 12 re- 
quested and 4 women and 6 men ages' 
late20'sandup. 

"The Miracle Worker" is a dramati- 
zation of the story of Helen Keller and 
her teacher, Annie Sullivan and will be 
directed by Donna Badtke, Genoa City, 
WI.. It will be given weekends March 31- 
April 16. Call 414-279-2204 for any fur- 
ther information. 



Figure skaters audition 

Talented figure skaters who can 
amaze with axels, toe loops and spins 
are invited to audition for the musical 
ice extravaganza Disney On Ice cele- 
brates 75 Years of Disney Magic Feb. 8 
beginning at 3 p.m. at Chicago's United 
Center, located at 1901 W. Madison St., 
Chicago. Prospective skaters should en- 
ter the United Center through Gate 4 
(located near the Michael Jordan stat- 
ue). 

Skaters who hope to join the inter- 
national cast of Disney on ice cele- 
brates 75 Years of Disney Magic, or 
other Feid Entertainment® ice shows, 
must be at least 17 years of age and 
available to travel for extended periods 
oftime. 

Personality, appearance and abil- 
ity to learn intricate routines will be 
considered in the application process; 
a background in jazz, ballet or dance 
is helpful. 

Prospective male and female 
skaters should bring ice skates, re- 
sume and photo and have the follow- 
ing information available at the audi- 
tion: name, address, phone number, 
age, height and current United 
States/Canadian Figure Skating Asso- 
ciation test levels. 

For an audition appointment or 
more information, call Lisa Scuffle, Re- 
cruiting and Productions Assistant, at 
(941)349-4848. 



Celebrate Profiles in 
Excellence at museum 

Celebrate the evolution of 20th century 
African American musical entertainment and fashion 
trends at the 17th annual Profiles in Excellence program on 
February 6, form 3-5 p.m., at hre Lake County museum near 
Wauconda. 

This year's program includes presentations by North Chicago, 
Waukegan and Zion area students on the history of the entertain- 
ment industry and how it has changed from local 
VWON radio to black entertainment television. Stu- 
dents will also lead discussions on entrepreneur- 
ship through the development of Ebony and Vibe 
magazines. 

A special appearance by Chicago Blues, featur- 
ing Shirley King, daughter of blues legend B.B. King, 
tops die event's-entertainment list. Through her performance, Shirley 
King will illustrate how the blues have served as the root of today's 
rap music. Area students will strut down the runway to rap music as 
they model the latest fashions by Fubu and other African American 
clothing designers. 

Nominees for most influential African American in Lake County 
as chosen by People's Voice, also will be recognized. Ethnic food and 
desserts will be served after the program. This entire program is free 
and open to all ages. 

The Lake County museum is located in Lakewood Forest Pre- 
serve, just west of Fairfield Rd. between Libertyville and Barrington. 
For more information on the program call 526-7878. 




Celebrate Valentine's Day at The Hemmens 

The renowned entertainer/singer, Jack Jones, brings his warm, 
intimate style and superb voice to The Hemmens Cultural 
Center on Feb. 19 at 8 p.m. when he will celebrate Valen- 
tine's Day by presenting his hit ballads as well as other tradi- 
tional pop standards. 

In 1 999 Jack received his sixth Grammy nomination (he's won two) 
for Best Traditional Pop Vocal Performance for his latest album, "Jack 
Jones Paints a Tribute to Tony Bennett." The album features some of 
Bennett's signature songs such as, "Skylark," "Shadow of Your Smile," 
"Fly Me To The Moon" and, of course, "I Left My Heart In San Fran- 
cisco." Tickets for Jack Jones' concert are $38 (Main Floor) and $36 
(Balcony). Tickets can be purchased by calling The Hemmens' 24- 
Hour Charge-It Line 93 1-5900 or purchased at The Hemmens' Box 
Office in Elgin's Civic Center Plaza, 150 Dexter Court, Elgin. 



CROSSWORD 



ACROSS 

I. 1/2 of famous couple 

5. Arranged in a container 
10. Avoid 

14. Exude 

15. Search engine 

16. Makes older 

17. Heard on March 20 

20. Tasty 

21 . Belongs to sun god 

22. Act in concert 

23. Clock time 
25. Carry off 
29. Rental 

33. Freshens 

34. Near, against 

35. Company that rings receipts 

36. Artful 

38. Type of delivery 

41. Worked 

42. American state 

44. Steadies 

45. Algonqulans 

48. Prettiest 

49. Smart 

50. Jewellery 

51 . Haffez al- , Syrian president 

54. Bode 

59. I'm always " 

62. Fish 

63. Causes to be heard 

64. Sword 

65. Armor plating 

66. Anchor rope passes through this 
hole 

67. Phonograph record 

DOWN 

1, Linear unit 

2. Anticipation 

3. Pound, poet 

4. Imaginary numbers 

5. Young swan 

6. Expressed pleasure 

7. Herringlike fish 

8. Goddess 

9. Runs PCs 

10. Jean Paul , author 

I I . Caused by sporozoan" parasites 
12. diagram (Math) 

13. Heat units 



18. Not at all 

19. Pope John 

23. Central Chinese province 

24. Churches 

25. Os 

26. Column span 

27. Bird genus 

28. Increase motor speed 

29. Soul and calypso songs 

30. Bless 

31 . Shenanigans 

32. Max , Dadalst painter 

37. German river 

39. Perspicaciousness 

40. Tell on 
43. Nestling 

46. States of matter 

47. German car 

48. Purplish rod 

50. Staircases 

51. Hurt 

52. Do a dance 



53. Japanese beverage 

54. Think (archaic) 

55. In bed 

56. Indian helmet 

57. Sheeps 
58.1 

60. Ordinal 

61. Indian city 



Answer 



1 


2 


3 


4 


1 

18 


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February 4, 2000 



FOR YOUR ENTERTAINMENT 



Lakeland Newspapers I B5 



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lining for gray 'Angela's Ashes' 




hen I look back on my 
childhood, I wonder 
how my brothers and 
I managed to survive 
at all. It was, of course, a miserable 
childhood: the happy childhood is 
hardly worth your while. Worse 
than the ordinary miserable child- 
hood Is the miserable Irish child- 
hood, and worse yet is the miser- 
able Irish Catholic childhood." 

These lines, said by the narrator 
at the start of Angela's Ashes, set the 
tone for the dark look into the Irish 
condition in the 1930s and 40s. 

Based on the best selling mem- 
oir of author Frank McCourt, the 
movie follows the author's family 



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movie review 

HPKsaaacsatseBCBn 





Tim O'Donnell 



through their struggles to survive in 
the impoverished Emerald Isle, 
which definitely does not live up to 
its nickname through the eye of di- 
rector Alan Parker. ■• 

Ireland was not a good place to 
be in the 1930s, Famine and unem- 
ployment caused many to flee the 
island to seek a better life in the 
United States. 

However, the McCourt family 
does the exact opposite, deciding to 
move from New York City to Ireland 
after the death of their newborn 
baby. 

Both the country's problems 
and the family's problems continu- 
ally hold the McCourt's down. Fa- 
ther Malachy (Robert Carlyle) can- 
not find a job. When he does, he 
spends his paychecks on alcohol 
His addiction holds him back dou- 
bly when he loses jobs because he 
cannot wake up for them. 

Mother Angela (Emily Watson) 
is continually trying to deal with her 
husband's downfalls. But she has 
troubles of her own, as she tries to 
keep her hopes up while having to . 
beg for her family's survival. 

Through all this, there is the el- 
dest son Frank, played by three ac- 
tors; Joe Breen, Ciaran Owens and 
Michael Legge; each portraying dif- 
ferent stages in the young boy's life. 
As the movie's protagonist, Frank 
tries to break free of his father's 
shadow without breaking ties with 
his family. 

Throughout the movie, Parker 
bluntly illustrates the hardships 
that the McCourt family went 
through. None of the events that 
occur are ever explained, leaving 
the viewer miite depressed by the 
end of the movie. . 

This movie does not have plot in 
the conventional sense of term. 



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Angela's Ashes 

Rating 

" R 
Director 

Alan Parker 
Starring 

Emily Watson 
Robert Carlyle* 
Shane Murray-Gorcoran 




3 popcorn boxes out of ffve 

There is definitely a series of con- 
flicts that drive the story, but never 
a moment of release, never a 
catharsis that resolves the problems 
or even explains why they exist' 
The problems are just there. This 
tactic left me with mixed feelings 
about the movie. 

On one hand, the way this movie 
Is presented is starkly realistic, 
Parker shows that he is a director 
who can present something with 
unforgiving realism, who can ignore 
the trappings of explanations, and 
who can tell a story without forcing 
sympathy on the viewer. 

But on the other hand, this stark 
realism and unsympathetic style in 
the movie leaves the viewer with no 
sympathy for the characters, as 
well. They are portrayed as victims, 
as people who are tortured by this 
unknown force and do nothing to 
save themselves. 

In The Commitments, a Parker 
film that tackles the same issues as 
this movie, the characters are in the 
same position, but they do some- 
thing to elevatemernseivesT.m so- 
cial status, then in their own minds. 
They give themselves a reason to 
live. In Angelas Ashes, this never 
comes across. The characters seem 
to struggle and struggle only to " 
struggle some more. 

Even Frank, who seems to want 
to rise above this tedious life, fails in 
my mind. 

I think it was brave of Parker to 
approach this movie the way he 
did, but unfortunately the charac- 
, ter's, despite some wonderful act- 
ing, did not have any redeeming 
qualities to them, and therefore, 
neither did the movie. I give Ange- 
la's Ashes three popcorn boxes be- 
cause of the realism. It would have 
been more had the realism opened 
the door to good characters'. 



EGAL ' 



CINEMAS* 



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THE SIXTH SENSE (PC-1-) (1:45 4:10) 820 6:4003 



LAKE ZURICH 12 




Young Frank (Joe Breen) and Young Malachy (Shane Murray Cor- 
coran) make their way past jeering kids in Para mount's Angela's 
Ashes. 



THEATRE REVIEW 

Triumphant return 
of 'Joseph' to Marriott 



Joseph and the Amazing Tech- 
nicolor Dreamcoat" was one 
of Andrew Lloyd Weber's first 
rock operas. This lively bibli- 
cal tale has enjoyed greater suc- 
cess the second time around. - 

In fact, Joseph is visiting Mar- 
riott after almost 20 years and he 
and his fellow "reborn " biblical 
characters are just as "amazing" as 
they were then and watching and 
listening to them traverse the 
entire musical gamut from 
rock, to country, to calypso 
and cabaret with equal 
alacrity adds up to an 
enjoyable musical 
evening with 
opening 



night's audience giving the cast a 
standing ovation. 

Marriott's singing and dancing 
ensemble steals the show whether 
they're rocking with "Go, go go 
Joseph," or hilariously emoting in 
such show stoppers as "Those 
Canaan Days." One of these is Rob 
Rahn whom we have enjoyed in 
100 of Marriott's best 

Danny Gurwin 's Joseph is 
likeable and his rendition of "Any 
^preamWillDo," is another show- 
stopper. 
One of Marriotts favorite lead- 
ing ladies, Susan Moniz glides 
through her part as the narra- 
tor, her voice as good as ever, 
but she seems to be a little 
bored with the whole 
thing. 

As many times as we 
have seen the show, it 
seems we discover 
something we 
missed seeing 
before 
"Joseph" is 
a family 
show run- 
ning 
through March 26.— By 
Gloria Davis 



Danny Gurwin stars In "Joseph and the Amazing Technicolor 
Dreamcoat" at The Marriott Theatre in Lincolnshire,, running 
through March 26. 



.7bSS R.vnriBd 



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WHERE. MOVIE GOING IS FUN AND AFFORDABLE 



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ISN'T SHE GREAT (R) (1 2.15 2 30 450) 7.05 9 20irwl 
DOWN TO YOU(PG-U) (12:10 225 4.40) 555 9:10rml 
THE HURRICANE (R) (1 1.50 3 00) 6.i0 9.20iwl 

THE CDER HOUSE RULES(PO-ll) [124$ 340) 525 9 20tml 
THE TALENTED UA. RlPLEY(R) (12:15 110) 6.109 IOstbI 
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THE GREEN MILE (R) (12004.00) 7:4SflTfll 

TOY STORY 3(G) (11 £52 15 4 351 7:00* 15 «w| 



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END OF THE AFFAIR (R) 

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February 4, 2000 



; February 4, 2000 



HOT SPOTS 



^ i - - m 



Lakeland Newspapers I B7 



iwi miiin 



. . ADVERTISEMENT 



SPOTLIGHT: 



Euro 




Location: 

164S. Rte. 12, Fox Lake 

Telephone: 

(847)973-1800 

Hours: 

11 a.m. to 9:30 p.m., Sun. through Thurs., and 11 a.m. to 10:30 

p.m. on Fri. and Sat. 

Menu: 

European and America cuisine served for lunch and dinner — 

Daily specials. 



Euro Bistro 



en tic 



continental dining 

The EuroBistro restaurant welcomes a new head 
chef, with a wide variety of backgrounds and ready to 
meet the American and European dining tastes. 

He is Roy Roman. He comes to the Fox Lake restau- 
rant after working for some of the more well-known 
establishments in the Chicago area. 

Roman has a loyal following, including some at this 
Monday afternoon lunch hour. His specialties cross both 
North American and European tastes. . 

New on Jan. 2 will be a Sunday Champagne brunch 
from 1 1 a.m. to 3 p.m. A Saturday brunch will be 
offered from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. A daily luncheon buffet 
will be served Monday through Friday. ■ 

If you are too busy to go on a vacation, yet it's the 
continental atmosphere and taste of European food you 
long for, pay a visit to the EuroBistro Restaurant and 
Deli, at 164 S. Rte. 12 in Fox Lake. EuroBistro has many 
delectable examples of American Cuisine on its menu, 
but it's the European flavor that has people flocking to 
the restaurant with casual continental decor, owned 
and operated by Roman and Sophia Susfal. 

Their many years in the food service business has 
taught them that customers want good food, served in a 
comfortable and attractive atmosphere, by a friendly, yet 
professional staff. Of course EuroBistro offers a different 
lunch and dinner special every day. After a cozy bowl of 
homemade French onion, mushroom or potato soup, try 
their Polish sausage and potato pancakes. For dinner, a 
Polish Plate filled with dumplings, Polish sausage, sauer- 
kraut, mashed potatoes and blintzs is a popular menu 
item' Every Friday there's a sumptuous fish fry featuring 
fresh fried haddock. With the holiday party season upon 
us, remember EuroBistro has a terrific party menu serv- 
ing 10 to 50 family style starting at $6.95 per person, as 
well as convenient carryouts. Make party reservations 
early! 

EuroBistro is open from 1 1 a.m. to 9:30 p.m., 
Sunday through Thursday, and from 1 1 a.m. to 10:30 
p.m. Friday and Saturday. 
Call (847)973-1800 for more information, 




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STRIP STEAK 

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SPAGHETTI wilh Meal Sauce 

HOT DOG with French Fries 

1/2 LB. BURGER with French Fries 

Served *iih Smalt Soft Drink 



804 f Batraiv r BiatL 

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Beef or Chicken Tacos 9.0$ Each 




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Proudly Announces 

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has Joined the Jukebox Staff. 

Rated lop Dance Spot in Lake 
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Bo / Lakeland Newspapers 



HOT SPOTS 



February 4, 2000 



mm 






Join Us For Our Weekend Triple Treat 

at the GURNEE GRILL 



*^g&£ 







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a 



FRIDAY 

AIl-You-Can-Eat 

SEAFOOD BUFFET 

5 - 1 O P/v\ 



Snow crab 

Shell-on jumbo shrimp 

Oysters 

Marinated salmon, 

Lemon buttered sole 

Mussels casino 

Cajun fried catfish 

Clam strips 

Fried shrimp . . - •- 

Crab cakes 

BBQ chicken 

Pasta bar 

Carved roast beef 

Stuffed pork loin roast 

Ham and turkey 

Homemade breads and soup 

Fruit and salad bar " 

Dessert table and more 







SUNDAY 



BRUHCH BUL. 

At the Gurnee Grill 
Jan. 28-March 11 
1 AM - 2 PM 

* Made To Order Omelets 

k Bacon • Sausage • Breakfast 
Potatoes 

* French Toast 

* Freshly Baked Muffins & Danls 1 
^ Soup & Salad Bar 

^ Homemade Soups 

if CAJUN & CREOLE Specialties 

it Elaborate Assortment Of Fine 

Delicate Dessert Pastries 
^ Your Choice of Champagne 

or Mimosa 
** All NEW KH)$ BUFFET 
if Much, Much More 



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Saturday 

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* $16.95, 



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FOR RESERVATIONS, PLEASE CALL: {§£ 

(847) 336-6300, Ext. 3 

^*3 6161 W. Grand Ave. • Gurnee, IL I 



{Across from Gurnee Mills) 






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ALL»y & 



"Make/ your Personal/ 
Statement wbth ay QlfT of- ART 

** Original works of art 

** Limited Edition Prints 

** Art Posters 

** Custom Framing 




: 



Route 12 at Route 173 
Richmond, IL 60071 

Open Tuesday-Friday 10am to 5pm 
Saturday 9am to 5pm 
Sunday 12pm to 5pm 

815-678-4682 









restaurant foi" our monthly dn^ihg to ^ 

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win a 





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Address: 






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Favorite Restaurant: 



Mail to: Lakeland Newspapers 
P.O. Box 268 • Grayslake, IL 60030 

;: ; January Hot "Spots "Winner:""' 

JOSEPH JEHLICKA, Antioch 

Favorite Restaurant: 

TANG'S 




American Pub & Eatery : W^ 



Lunches Dinners Banquets 



Steaks • Pastas • Seafood • Chicken 




IFRIDAY - 2/1 11 ISATURDAY - 2/12 

(p^ Live Band 

ance To 
The DJ! 



Tom Bonic 
V-D Show 





SUNDAY -2/13 

Special 

Valentine's 

Weekend Menus 



MONDAY •- 2/14 I 

Happy fjp 
Valentine's 
Day 




Bring in the whole family! 

Rt. 176, Just East 

ofRt. 12 

Live bands'^ Wauconda J ffi&frd 



Visit the Home 
& Garden Expo 

atthe 

Lake County 

Fairgrounds on 

February 5 8 6 for 

all your Home & 

Garden needs. 

Forefronts 

"Lake County 

Progress 2000" 

Who will be Lake 

County's top 10? 

•••••••••••• 

First week of every 

month, look for 

Lakeland's Home 

Marketer. 

rff(d tfout*' dream 6>ou$e> , 
Comift^ (0 

. Health Directory 
• ••••• •*• • • • • 

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Improvement 

Show & 
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• • • 



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Specializing in BARBECUED RIBS Si ^ ce 1963 

'£!> A Gale Street Tradition 

Fresh Seafood. Prime Rib. Prime Steaks and Chops. An 

award-winning salad, bar and tempting desserts. >^ Comp i ete 



Show Lounge Featuring 

"PETER MRIN SHOW" 

Elvis Impersonator 

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Party and banquet facilities (30-160) 



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906 Diamond Lake Rd.. Mundelein ^ 5&6--I090 



For information 
about advertising 
in HOT SPOTS, 

contact your 

Lakeland 

Newspapers' 

Account Executive 

at: 

(847) 
223-8161 



CONDELL MEDICAL 
CENTER 

Centre Lights Cafe 

On Monday, Feb. 7 from 4 to 8 
p.m.-, Centre Lights Cafe at Centre 
Club, 200 W. Golf Rd., Ubertyvillc, 
serves "Centre Lights Seniors" 
Dinner at $6 a person every Mon- 
day. 573-4373; n 

Make Today Count 

, On Wednesday, Feb. 9 from 7:30 
p.m., Make Today County support 
group for people and their fami- 
lies who have experienced or who 
are experiencing a life-threatening 
illness. 362-2905, ext 5550. 



New Life Maternity Center 
Boot Camp For New Dads 

On Saturday, Feb. 12 at 1 p.m., 
The New Life Maternity Center 
Boot Camp For Dads offer the op- 
portunity tor rookie fathers ex- 
pecting their first baby to learn 
from veteran dads. 362-2905, ext 
5407. 

PROVENA SAINT 
THERESE 

Free lectures at the 
library 

From 7 to 8 p.m. at the 
Waukegan Public Library, at 128 
N. County SL There is a concur- 
rent story reading for children 
over 3 years of age. To register call 
1-888-869-1118. February 28: 
"Coronary Artery Disease: Heart 
Failure." Presented by William 
Martinez, MD. March 27: "Dia- 
betes: Head to Toe." Presented by 
Xavier Parrefio, MD. 

Cardiac screening 

February 15, 17 and 26 from 8 to 
1 1 a.m. at the Heart Center of Lake 
County/Includes coronary risk 
profile, lipid profile and incentive 
spiromctry.Cost is $20. Appoint- 
ments are required/To register, 
call 1-888-869-1118. 

Free Heartsaver CPR 
classes 

February 9 and February 23 
from 6:30 to 9:30 p.m. For adults 
ages 18 and up who would like 
to learn CPR and choking res- 
cue techniques (healthcare 
professionals excluded). Limit- 
ed to 25 people per class. Reg- 
istration is required, call 1-888- 
869-1118. 

LAKE FOREST 
HOSPITAL 

Senior Tour of the Lake 
Forest Hospital Health and 
Fitness Institute 
in Lindenhurst 

The group will tour the facility, 
receive Information on member- 
ship and participate in an exercise 
class. To sign up, call Karri at 535- 
8400. Date: Tuesday, February 29. 
Time: 9:30 to 11a.m. 

Breastfeeding your baby 

Join LFH's breastfeeding expert 
for a session devoted to breast- 
feeding issues. Babies are wel- 
come. Fee. Call 234-6182. 

Surviving the first 12 
weeks of motherhood 

New mothers (and their babies) 
are invited to this forum for cop- 
ing strategies and sharing. Topics 
include infant feeding, sleep pat- 
terns, postpartum blues, changing 
relationships and other areas of 
concern or wonder. No fee. Call 
234-6182. 

VICTORY 

MEMORIAL 

HOSPITAL 

Alzheimer's and Related 
Diseases 

Alzheimer's and Related Dis- 
eases" support group meets 
from 4-6 on the third Wednes- 
day of each month. This group 
meets at Victory Lakes Contin- 
uing Care Center, 1055 East 
Grand Avenue, Lindenhurst. 
Call 356-5900 for more infor- 
mation. 

Adult Children of Alcoholics 

Adult Children of Alcoholics 
meets at 7:30 p.m. every Friday. 
Call 360-4073. Sponsored by Vic- 
tory Memorial Hospital. 




B9 / Lakeland Newspapers 



Eebruary.4, 2000 



Stretch it out -The stretches you need to get flexible and fit 



When it comes to fitness regi- 
mens, stretching usually comes in a 
distant third —behind aerobics 
and strength training — probably 
because it isn't directly associated 
with weight loss or dramatic 
changes in appearance. Yet without 
a good stretch, all your hard work at 
the gym would not be complete. 
Stretching before and after physical 
activity will not only help prevent 
injury, but can also improve sports 
performance by increasing your 
range of motion and improving 
your coordination. 

Even if you aren't going to get a 
full workout, spending 20 minutes a 
day stretching can have a wonder- 
ful effect on your general well-be- 
ing. It will free your body of muscu- 
lar tension, improve circulation and 
enhance muscle tone. Stretching 
now will also help you avoid some 
of the unpleasant hallmarks of ag- 
ing, such as decreased flexibility, 
poor balance and stiff joints. Best of 
all, stretching makes you feelgood. 

Before you begin stretching, 
read the tips below to learn how to 
get the most from your exercise. 
Stretching Dos and Don'te: 

Stretch as often as you can — 
three to five times a week Is recom- 
mended. 

Remember to stretch after you 
work out. Many people think 
stretching is only necessary before 
exercise, but stretching afterwards 
is essential to avoid cramping, 
tightness and reduced range of mo- 
tion. 

Warm up for three to five min- 
utes prior to stretching A warm-up 
is any continuous movement that 



increases your body's core temper- 
ature, such as going up and down 
the stairs a few times or riding a sta- 
tionary bike. 

Breathe slowly and deeply 
throughout each stretch . Calm 
breathing will help relax you and . 
your muscles arid facilitate safe; ef- 
fective stretching 

Focus on the muscles being 
stretched and hold each stretch for 
at least 10 to 30 seconds, or five to 
six full breaths. Repeat each stretch 
three to five times. 

Don't bounce. Bouncing can 
force the joints past their natural 
range of motion, causing sprains of 
the ligaments or tendons. Instead,* 
focus on stretching to a point where 
you feel a mild tension. If the ten- 
sion goes away after 10 to 30 sec- 
onds of holding the stretch, adjust 
your body ever so slightly until you 
feel a mild tension again, and hold 
for a further 10 to 30 seconds. 

Most importantly, stretching 
should feel good. Never go beyond 
the point of feeling a mild tension 
In your muscles. If the tension is" 
uncomfortable, you are over- 
stretching and should ease up 
slightly. 

Hamstring Stretches 
Seated Hamstring Stretch 

Sit with your legs straight in 
front of you, with your feet relaxed 
(do not flex or point them). Betid 
one leg so that the bottom of the 
foot touches the inner thigh of the 
straight leg. With a straight back 
and open chest, bring your fore- 
head toward the shin of the straight 
leg. Reach foryour foot with both 
hands. Repeat for trie other leg. ■ 




Stretching provides many benefits, ineluding increased range of 
motion and greater range of motion. 



Variation: If you cannot reach 
your foot, place a towel around 
your foot and hold onto the ends of 
the towel with both hands. You 
should feel this stretch In the back 
of your thigh. 

Guidelines; Hold each stretch 
for ten to thirty seconds. Repeat 
three to five times. 
Lying Hamstring Stretch 
Lie on your back with your knees 
bent and your feet flat on the floor. 
Extend one leg straight up toward 
the ceiling. Grasp the leg with both 
hands and slowly pull it toward 
your face until you feel a slight ten- 
sion. Make sure you keep your head 



relaxed with your chin tucked in 
slightly. Repeat for the other leg. 
The important thing is not how 
close your leg comes to your chest 
but that the leg stays straight and 
you feel tension. If you have diffi- 
culty reaching your leg, loop a towel 
around your foot for help. You 
should feel this stretch in the back 
of your thigh. 

Guidelines: Hold each stretch 
for ten to thirty seconds. Repeat 
three to five times. 

Guidelines: Hold each stretch 
for ten to thirty seconds. Repeat 
three to five times. — By Laura 
Losada.. 



Achieve success in sport, life: master the mind 



Since the day you took your 
very first steps as an infant, with 
your mind focused on the present 
moment— free of concern or anxi- 
ety —your body relaxed and your 
emotions uninhibited, you had 
within you the force behind the 
means for achieving success in both 
sport and life. 

What you had then was body 
mind mastery, and although you 
may not realize it, you have the po- 
tential for achieving it even now, 
says Dan Millman, author of "Body 
Mind Mastery: Creating Success in 
Sport and Life" (New World Library). 

"We begin life with nearly un- 
limited potential," Millman says, 
"But then we lose touch with many 
of our childhood skills, through lim- 
iting beliefs, emotional conflict and 



physical tensions." 

A former world champion 
trampolinist, martial arts instructor, 
gymnastics coach and college pro- 
fessor, Millman draws from 
decades of world-class training, 
research, observation, intuition 
and teaching to demonstrate 
how any form of skill training — 
be it sports, music, dance or 
martial arts — can benefit and 
enhance everyday life. 

According to Millman, skill 
training can become a path to a 
greater goal, a doorway to personal 
growth or a bridge to your fullest 
human potential. The process be- 
gins first by understanding that it's 
not about dedicating your life to 
your training but about dedicating 
your training to your life. 



Seal out tooth decay 
with dental sealants 



February is National Children's 
Dental Health Month and the Illi- 
nois State Dental Society wants par- 
ents to know that dental sealants 
can help protect their children's 
teeth from decay. 

A sealant is a clear material that 
is applied to the chewing surfaces of 
the back teeth (premolars and mo- 
lars), where decay occurs most of- 
ten. The sealant acts as a barrier, 
protecting die decay-prone areas of 
the back teeth from a sticky film of 
bacteria called plaque. 

Pits and fissures are depres- 
sions and grooves in the chewing 
surfaces of the back teeth. They are 
difficult to keep clean because 
toothbrush bristles cannot reach 
into them. The sealant forms a thin 
covering that keeps out plaque and 



food and decreases the risk of de- 
cay. 

Each tooth takes only a few 
minutes to seal. After cleaning the 
teeth that will be sealed, the dentist 
conditions the chewing surface to 
help the sealant adhere to the tooth. 
The sealant is then applied to the 
tooth enamel, where is covers and 
protects the tooth against bacteria. 

While die sealant remains in- 
tact, the tooth surface will be pro- 
tected from decay. Sealants hold up 
well under the force of normal 
chewing. Although sealants may 
last several years before a ^applica- 
tion, regular checkups are impor- 
tant so the dentist can examine the 
child's teeth, gums and sealants. 

Ask your dentist if your child 
can benefit from sealants. 



The book, a revised and updat- 
ed edition of Millman's "The Inner 
Athlete," uses sports training as a 
metaphor that can be applied to ' 
every facet of life, to help you over- 
come self-created hurdles and 
reawaken your body mind mastery. 
Featuring warm-up exercises, pho- 
tos and detailed instructions on 
creating a daily exercise routine to 
help master the technique, the 
book also includes a section on the 
aging athlete. -. 
. Trie principles behind body 
mind mastery include: 

• Understand the larger game 
—Have a realistic vision and deep 
awareness of your potential in a giv- 
en endeavor. This requires under- 
standing natural laws, like balance, 
as well as applying the power of 
awareness and preparation to any 
situation, be it job-hunting or solv- 



ing a math equatio n. 

• Develop talent — Mental, 
emotional and physical talent all 
are factors in achieving a goal. An 
athlete who exercises diligently, yet 
hasn't developed the mental talent 
of concentration or the ability to 
apply breathing techniques to ease 
emotional tension, undoubtedly 
will meet obstacles. . 

• Body mind mastery in action 
— Body mind mastery integrates 
natural laws, talent and technique. 
Through a brand-new Peaceful 
Warrior warm-up, Millman shares 
the tools for training tips on com- 
petition and cooperation, as well as 
a comprehensive look at the evolu- 
tion of athletes. 

For more information or to * 
order the book, call 1-800-97- 
BOOKS (1-800-972-6657) or visit 
www.nwlib.com on the Internet. 



Rush Hospice Partners of Lake Forest 
Hospital hosts two grief support groups 



Rush Hospice Partners of Lake 
Forest Hospital is offering two grief 
support groups to assist communi- 
ty members who have experienced 
a loss. The first group Is an on-go- 
ing bi-weekly support group that 
meets the 2nd and 4th Mondays of 
the month at 7:30 p.m. at the West- 
moreland Nursing Center-Lake 
Forest Hospital. The second group 
Is an eight-week, workshop/sup- 
port group that meets on Mondays 
at 7:30 p.m. at Westmoreland Nurs- 
ing Center-Lake Forest Hospital. 
Both groups address coping with 
the symptoms of grief, understand- 
ing the grieving process, adapting 
to loss, and re-investing in life. 
Whether you experienced a loss re- 
cently or some time ago, we en- 
courage you to attend one of these 



groups. All groups are facilitated by 
trained bereavement counselors 
and/or licensed clinical social 
workers. For more information and 
to register, call 535-61 15, 
Organization Information 
' Rush Hospice Partners is a com- 
munity-based, not for profit hos- 
pice program providing compas- 
sionate, quality hospice and palli- 
avtve care in Cook, DuPage, Kane, 
Kendall, Lake, McHenry, and Will 
Counties. Rush Hospice Partners is 
licensed by the state of Illinois, cer- r 
tified by Medicare and Medicaid 
and accredited by JCAHO. All 
groups are open to hospice families 
and die public. For more informa- 
tion about hospice and end-of-life 
care issues, please contact Lisa An- * 
derson at 1 (800) 994-9400, 



,J *-— -A -* ~- ,<v v . ■ •*- i * -' 



t -t in-- M „"-^.«^. , »T»******t*** g » tf , itf «*»■—<» » bi — ■^^>j— « 



B1 0/ Lakeland Newspapers 



HEALTHWATCH 



February 4, 2000 



I 




HI Dr. Singer, 

I have a problem with the 
"Monkey See Monkey Do Syn- 
drome." My husband has a 
pretty colorful vocabulary 
and uses it quite often. I've ■ 
tried to speak to him over and 
over again about toning It 
down, if not getting rid of it al- 
together. The problem Is that 
we have a 7-year-old daughter 
who Is picking up the four let- 
ter words and saying them 
outside of our home. I am ap- 
. palled by it and am not sure of 
now to deal with this. Even 
though I keep asking him to 
stop, my husband isn't listen- 
ing to me. He grew up with a 
Mom who spoke the same way 
and he thinks it's fine to say 
these things in front of our 
child. I wonder if there is any 
way for me to let my child 
know that it's not OK to say 
these things even though her 
daddy is? Z.D. 

Dear Z.D., 

I think you've diagnosed this 
one correctly as the whole "mon- 
key see" problem. You can help 
your child to understand this, 
however, I will say that you have 
some work ahead of you and it 
will not be easy. 

The first thing I would tell you 
to do is to not give up on your 
"husband. Try and get in to see a 
counselor with your husband to 
see if a neutral person between 
you might help to smooth some of 
the different viewpoints. I often 
sec parents who are not in the 
same camp regarding behavior 
and the best 1st step would be to 
try and get both parents on the 
same team. 1 would be glad to 



see, mo 




WJ". 




PARENT'S 
PLACE 

Dr. Sherri Singer 



consult with you if you'd like. If 
you cannot get your husband to 
go with you to counseling, and he 
still doesn't agree with stopping 
the language, you should proba- 
bly do the counseling by yourself, 
at least for one or two sessions, 
and learn some strategies for how 
to get your child to stop doing 
this. There are behavioral systems 
that will work to help your chil- 
dren learn about this. If your 
daughter is held responsible for 
HER decisions, she will learn. Af- 
ter all, there will be many times in 
her life that others around her will 
be doing things that she should 
not be involved in. 

Wouldn't it be great if from 
the age of seven, she learned to 
follow what she knew was right for 
, her, instead of what was right for 
others around her. The hard part 
here is that Daddy should be a 
role model and that gets confus- 
ing for her. You might mention 
those words to Daddy and see if 
that might get through to him. 

The logic that I try to use in a 
situation that involves a young 
child doing things that are more 
characteristic of an adult, is to 
point out to both parents and 
children that there are many 
things that kids are not allowed to 
do, that adults are. For example, 



adults are allowed to drive. Kids 
aren't. Adults are allowed to 
smoke. Kid's aren't. Adults are al- 
lowed in "R" rated movies. Kids 
aren't. 

There are many things in our 
society that adults are allowed to 
do that kids just aren't allowed to 
do. There have been a lot of kids 
who I have met who do strongly 
feel that they should be allowed 
all the same privileges that their 
parents have. This is usually a sig- 
nificant indicator that boundaries 
in the family need to be stronger. 
At age 7, it may be a little tough 
for your daughter to understand 
what is adult and what is child, 
but if you make clear, that foul lan- 
guage isn't appreciated from her 
or Daddy either, but Daddy is an 
adult and can make that decision, 
you are setting up a very impor- 
tant boundary for your daughter 
to understand for other future be- 
haviors as well. 

Obviously, the best scenario is 
that your husband sees the light 
and stops using the language, but 
sometimes, what comes naturally, 
happens before we think. Remem- 
ber that one or two sessions might 
be helpful. Call me if you want to 
consult. 

Dr. Sherri Singer is a Licensed 
Clinical Psychologist and Child- 
hood Behavior Specialist. She reg- 
ularly works in person with many 
readers of this column, helping 
them to significantly improve their 
kid's behavior and learning skills. 
She is the author of, "Why Kids 
Misbehave" and "Raising Kids 
Wlw Don't Become Your Worst 
Nightmare." For an appointment 
or to purchase either of Dr. Singer's 
books, please call (847) 577-8832 
or (708) 962-2549. '. 



The skinny on fat -Being pregnant 
means you get to eat fat guilt-free! 






Watching the types and 
amounts of fat you eat is impor- 
tant — for the short and long term 
— for several reasons: 

* Ounce per ounce, fat has 
more than twice as many calories 
as carbohydrate or protein. 

* Some types of fat are ab- 
solutely essential for humans be- 
cause the body cannot make 
them. EPA and DHA, two omega-3 
oils found in fish, are important 
for the building of fetal brain 
(which is 60 percent lipid) and eye 
tissue. Alpha-linoleic acid, found 
in polyunsaturated vegetable oils, 
can be converted to EPA and DHA 
in the body, but not very efficient- 
ly. Best sources of alpha- 1 in oleic 
are canoia oil and soybean oil. 

Another essential fat that can't 
be made in your body is linoleic 
acid (omega-6). All vegetable oils 
contain linoleic acid, but saf- 
flower oil is richest. Most people's 
diets contain too much omega-6 
and not enough omega-3. Omega- 
6 and omega-3 oils form biologi- 
cally active compounds that affect 
body functions such as blood 
pressure, blood clotting and im- 
mune response, so the right bal-, 
a nee could make a profound dif- 
ference to overall health. To get 
enough of these essential fats in 
your diet, try to have a balance of 
oils rich in omega-6 and omega-3. 
Eating fish [especially fatty fish) a 
few times per week can help en- 
sure adequate omega-3 intake. 

* Fat calorics are stored easier 
than calories from other sources. 
Meaning, the more fat you eat, the 
more fat you wear. 

•A high-fat intake is impli- 
cated in heart disease and cer- 
tain types of cancer, especially 
breast, prostate and colon can- 
cer. 



* A high-fat diet, or eating 
fried foods, can aggravate the 
nausea of early pregnancy and 
heartburn later in pregnancy. 

* Types of fat called trans-fatty 
acids are made when liquid oils 
are hydrogenated for storage or 
cooking purposes — for example, ■ 
oil that is made into shortening or 
stick margarine. These types of fat 
appear worse than saturated fat in 
terms of heart disease and may 
have widespread implications for 
other diseases. Recent research 
also shows that trans-fatty acids 
get into the fetal blood stream in 
relation to the mother's consump- 
tion; trans-fat could restrict birth 
weight. Trans- fatty acids are 
mostly found in margarines, 
shortening and products made 
from these, such as bakery goods, 
commercially fried foods and 
snack foods. You may want to 
avoid margarine or use as little as 
possible and keep processed, 
high-fat foods to a minimum. 
Look at the label of several mar- 
garines and choose a "tub" prod- 
uct that has liquid oil as the first 
ingredient. Currently, the amount 
of trans-fatty acids is not listed on 
the food label. 

To put your own fat intake in 
perspective, fat should be about 
30 percent of your calories. If you 
are having difficulty gaining 
weight, you may need to increase 
your intake of fat, but try to get 
the extra fat from vegetable 
sources (such as avocado, nuts, 
peanut butter, vegetable oils, 
etc.). 

"The average pregnant 
woman needs 2,200 to 2,400 calo- 
ries, and 30 percent of those calo- 
ries would work out to be about 70 
to 90 grams of fat." This may 
sound like a lot. 



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19 



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SI- LAKER: 



ALZHEIMER'S DISEASE AND 
HOW IT AFFECTS THE WHOLE PERSON 

TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 15, 2000 7:00-8:30 P.M. 
SHERIDAN HEALTH CARE CENTER 

* linn |)i deal Willi till- emotional I SMIL'S 

* Focuses mi iln: individual ami liow In help that 
person deal with the- diagnosis 

* How in help the Individual ileal wild (lie physical changes 
brought on |»y Alzheimer's 

* Emphasis on understanding and supporting 
remaining abilities in order to maximize (tie 
person's quality of life 

* [low to focus on the good qualities of life afier i! a^.iosis 
MAHTINJ. GORMEN. MO, FACP 

t)r. Gorhicn is currently the Dlrecitir of lite Section of Geriatric 
and Associate Professor of Internal Medicine 
at Rush-Prcsbytcrian - St. Luke's Medical Center In 
Chicago, lie completed fellowship training at the UCLA 
Mitllicampus Division of Geriatrics and Gerontology, Dr. 
Gorhicn is ao author and lecturer who has enjoyed community 
outreach since he began working In nursing homes while In 
high school. He has a special Interest in quality of life, medical 
ethics, and cud-of-tifc decision making. Currently, he is the 
vice-chair of the American Geriatrics Society's Clinical Practice 
Committee. In his community, he works on a uuihidisciplinary 
board devoted to the prevention of elder abuse ami neglect, 

Be sure to visit and talk with Sheridan Health Cure Center's 
well-respected, caring stalf trained in Alzheimer's care and 
related dementia areas: 

* Affordable quality Alzheimer's care right in your own community 

* Psychological and functional assessments 

* behavioral and environmental interventions 

* rhaniiacoltigic.il treatment 

* Information about legal ami ethical concerns 

* Support for the family 

* Adult Day Care Programs 

FOR RESERVATIONS CALL TODAY: 

SHERIDAN HEALTH CARE CENTER 

2534 ELIM AVENUE 

ZION, ILLINOIS 60099 

847-746-8435 



INFORMATION 
RESOURCES: 



1 



■— i 






F 



February 4, 2000 





Lakeland Newspapers/ B 1 1 b 




;ntFill-hi 



Fill in the blanks below, and discover 12 entertainers of groups 
who performed to help ring in the year 2000. 



1. S_RE_S_ND 

2. _OU_ET 

3. S EW RT 



4. I LE 



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6. RO KE 



7. _AG„ES 

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How they SAY il in. 



Knglish: 

Spanish: 

Tuiliiin: 

I'mirh: 

(Jcrnian: 

Liiliu: 



Mm 

COKNO. 
COIV 
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COUNU 



TIMELINE 



t 




1926192 



Fact: 



In Febuary, the schoolboard.of ■ 
Atlanta, Ga.,. banned teaching or 
■the theory of evolution in the- :."' ; '- ■; 
city's public schools." . 

Actress Marilyn Monroe was born in 
Lbs Angles, CA., on June: 1. .. ; 

* » * - > " i -'"-■. i . 

* • .*' ■ * ; , '" * 

On July, New York City subway workers 
launched a successful strike for better '..■■ 
pay and shorter hours. ..'.'. 



What is the 
first celestial 
body to have 

been visited 
by a 

spacecraft? 




In what year did five companies agree to 
cooperate on the construction of the camcorder? 



ANSWERS 

AqviOMXOj -it 

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Ice Skate 
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-i'\ 



LAKELIFE 



February 4, 2000 



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F L O O R IN G + D E S I G N 



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■ Lakeland 
Newspapers 

fthruaiy4-10, 

2000 



Section 




COUNTY DIGEST 



Exams held for 
Board of Review 
positions 

In accordance with Section 6-10 
of the Property Tax Code (35 ILCS, 
200/6-10), an examination will be 
conducted by the Illinois Department 
of Revenue for persons wanting to 
qualify as either a regular or addi- 
tional member of the Lake County 
Board of Review. 

Applicants may obtain an appli- 
cation, additional information and 
study materials by contacting the 
Board of Review office, 18 N. County 
SL, 8th Floor, Waukegan, (phone 360- 
6610) weekdays between the hours of 
8:30 a.m. and 5 p.m. CSX Completed 
applications must be returned to the 
Board of Review office no later than 
Monday, Feb. 14. 

III. tollway posts toil 
violation warnings 

The Illinois State Toll Highway 
Authority will post warning messages 
this week at key' interchanges 
throughout the system as part of an 
awareness campaign on toll violation 
penalties. Beginning Jan. 1, the Toll- 
way Authority, along with the Secre- 
tary of State's Office, has the ability to 
suspend either the drivers license or 
license plate of any Tollway violator 
with a minimum of five toll viola- 
tions. 



'*. '»., ,vt, < 




WEEK 



MISLABELED 

Some things defy 
logical explanation 

SEE 
PAGE C5 



ON A 

GROWTH TEAR 

CDW earnings up 
60 percent 



SEE 
PAGEC6 



Andrea Moore digs 
leaf burning ban 
out of the ashes 



By SANDY HARTOGH 
Staff Reporter 



studies should be made and be 
brought back to the board. Her mo- 

" tionwas rejected by a 11-10 vote. 

Like the mythical Phoenix that "A lot of people are in denial that 

rises from the ashes, the leaf burning Lake County has poor air quality," 



ban controversy has once 
again resurfaced. This 
time, the ban proposal 
was taken to a higher lev- 
el of government by State 
Representative Andrea 
Moore (R-Libertyville). 

Smoke from leaf and 
yard waste burning could 
become a nostalgic mem- 
ory for Lake County resi- 
dents, if legislation intro- 
duced to the Illinois 
House last week by Moore 
is adopted. 

Moore is the key sponsor of 
House Bill 3009 r whlch would ban the 
open burning of landscape waste 
within the Illinois Ozone Nonattain- 
ment Areas, which include Lake, 
Cook and McHenry counties. Ex- 
emptions for agricultural and conser- 
vation purposes are included in the 
bill. If the bill is signed into law, of- 
fenders could face fines of up to $500 
for each offense. 

Moore said she is very hopeful 
that the bill will be adopted. She not- 
ed that the bill could get called to the 
House floor as early as next week. 

"We [the bill sponsorsl are very en- 
thused," stated Moore. "We are also 
very close to geltingsupport from the 
Municipal League." 

Her legislation is already support- 
ed by the Illinois Department of Nat- 
ural Resources, the Illinois Environ- 
mental Council, the Illinois Lung As- 
soc the Illinois Environmental Pro- 
tection Agency and the Sierra Club. 

Lake County Board member 
Sandy Cole (R-Grayslake) said the bill 
will actually encourage all counties to 
institute some sort of ordinance or 
policy regarding leaf burning. She 
pointed out that the language of the 
house bill is a "little vague," and 
hopes that it will get clearer before it 
reaches the house floor. 

Cole initially voted for a partial 
ban and restrictions on leaf burning, 
but ultimately voted against the rec- 
ommendation when the issue went 
to the floor of the county board. She 
did suggest, at the time, that further 




Moore: Leaf 

burning ban is 

still a hot issue 

with her 



stressed Cole. "We are 
stuck, like a valley, be- 
tween two major industri- 
al cities — Kenosha and 
Chicago. Andrea is really 
looking out for the health 
of her constituents." 

Many residents may 
not see it that way. Unin- . 
corporated Lake County 
resident Marv Westfall 
called Moore's legislation 
a "political football that 
isn't going anywhere." 
Westfall maintained 
that he would "love to see all leaf 
burning stopped in Lake County," but 
not If it means getting unfunded 
mandates from the state. 

"Someone is going to have to pay 
for leaf collections," said Westfall, 
who admitted to researching the is- 
sue for months. "If Moore can get 
funding for this project, then I will be 
the first to go out and campaign.for. 
her. The worst law that can be. put 

~ Please $e*BPM/C2 




Lake County Board member Larry Leafblad talks with Nelson 
Reese about the former Reese Family farm, which was acquired 
by the Lake County Forest Preserve, located on Rollins Road, east 
of Route 83. The two are holding a picture of the farm as it ap- 
peared In 1958.— Photo by Sandy Bressner 

New land in sight 
for Forest Preserve 



By. MICHELLE HABRYCH 
Staff Reporter 



Land adjacent to Rollins Savan- 
na forest preserve and Fourth Lake 
maybe purchased by the Lake Coun- 
ty Forest Preserve District 

- The Finance and Administrative 
Committee approved an ordinance 
Ian. 28 authorizing the execution of a 
contract for the purchase of the BO 
ticres. 



In the past 10 months, the dis- 
trict has acquired three parcels to fill 
in the area southwest of Rte. 132 and 
north of Rollins Rd. in Third Lake, in- 
cluding the 97-acre Larsen property 
east of Fourth Lake. 

The property, belonging to An- 
thony DiMucci, is composed of open 
water, oak and hickory woodlands, 
marshes and open field. 

Please see LAND IC2 




Hbme& Garden 







nears 



Thinking of doing some remodeling or "fixing tip" on your home 
,thissprmg?OnFeb,5and6frqml0arru to 6 p.m.atthe Lake County 
Mrgrounds (Routes 45 and 120), Grayslake, the Lake County Home 
■ and Garden Expo will be featuring new products and services for ail 
your heeds. . 

Some of the products featured vrill be for kitchens, such as cabinet 
•replacing or refacing; 

The bath might be spruced up with a new spa or tile. 

Perhaps you are. looking for new flooring, such as carpeting? 

Homeowners searching for landscaping Ideas will find it there at 
the Home and Garden Show. 

Over 100 booth Will be there for everyone to viewproducts and 
services. 

Also .there is a chance to win 'a big screen TV from Douglas TV. 

Admission is $3 adults, children are free; Seniors $2. 

The Lake Countys Home and Garden Expo 2000 is sponsored by 
Lakeland Newspapers, Market journal and Strictly Spas. For more in- 
formation call Homestar Productions at 231-4000, 





out grants 

By SANDY HARTOGH 
Staff Reporter 



Since 1992, the Lake County 
Storrriwater Management Commis- 
sion (SMC) has provided help to 
county municipalities for small 
drainage and flood reduction pro- 
jects. This help has come fin the form 
of cost-share grants, which are a part 
of the SMC's annual budget, and 
technical assistance. 

According to Susan Vancil, public 
information representative for the 
SMC, $109,000 in Watershed Man- 
agement Board (WMB) funds will be 

Please see GRANTS IC2 



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COUNTY 



February 4, 2000 



CLC NOTES 



Musical saluting Hank Williams 



"Lost Highway— The Music and 
Legend of Hank Williams" will be 
presented in the Mainstage Theatre 
at the College of Lake County at 7 
p.m., Feb. 20. 

The musical, which is partially 
sponsored by a grant from the Illi- 
nois Arts Council, explores the life, 
loves and music of the legendary 
Hank Williams, one of country mu- 
sic's most celebrated stars. 

Williams, who died in 1953, is 
considered by many to be the father 
of contemporary country music. 

His music lives on with such 
timeless hits as "Your Cheatin' Heart," 
"I'm So Lonesome I Could Cry," "Hey, 
Good Lookin'" and "I Can't Help It If 
I'm Still In Love With You." 

The musical premiered in 1966 
at the Ryman Auditorium in 
Nashville, played for two seasons with 
rave reviews, and is currently on na- 
tional tour. 

Tickets are $25 for the general 
public and $22 for CLC students, 
staff and alumni and those 65 years 
of age and older. 

Call the box office at 543-2300 
for ticket information. 

'Branded to Kill' 
to be screened 

The movie "Branded to Kill," 



part of CLC's international film series, 
will be shown at 7 p.m., Feb. 25 in 
Room D100 at the Grayslake Campus. 

According to film instructor 
Patrick Gonder this movie, directed 
by Japanese director Seijun Suzuki, 
was hailed by the critics as "a brutal, 
hilarious and visually inspired mas- 
terpiece." Admission is free. 

This film contains adult content 
and is not suitable for children. 

For in formation, contact Patrick 
Gonder at 543-2555. 

Chicago artist to 
exhibit at CLC Gallery 

Chicago artist James Mesple 
■will present an exhibit titled "Meta- 
morphoses" Feb. 25 through March 
26 at the Community Gallery of Art at 
the College of Lake County. 

A reception is scheduled for 
Feb. 25, 7 to 9 p.m. in the gallery. 

The exhibit features a series of 
paintings based on "Metamor- 
phoses" by the Roman poet Ovid. 
The paintings draw parallels be- 
tween the mystery of the myth and 
our contemporary world. 

To provide insight into the cre- 
ative process, a group ofMesple's 
working drawings will be featured in 
the exhibit. 



Contracts awarded for roads bids 



Low bids totaling over 
$175,482,039.43 million on high 
way and bridge improvements pro- 
jects throughout the state were re- 
ceived by the Illinois Department 
of Transportation on the Jan. 21 bid 
letting. Also included are seven 
aeronautics and three land recla- 
mation projects. 

Following are some of the pro- 
jects for Lake County: 



IL 21, IL 132, Greenwood ltd.— 
District 1 

Concrete pavement patching 
along IL Route 21 from Sanders Rd. 
to Glenview Rd., IL Route 132 from 

- Dilley's Rd. to IL Route 21 a Green- 
wood Rd. north and south of Euclid 

j Ave./ East Lake Ave., all located in 
Glenview and Gurnee. Thirty-five 
working days. Triggi Construction, 
Inc., West Chicago $548,516.50. 



US Rte. 45— District 1 

Intersection reconstruction 
consisting of variable width widen- 
ing and pavement reconstruction, 
drainage work, landscaping and traf- 
fic signal modernization at the inter- 
section of US Route 45 and IL Route 
120 (Relvidere Rd.) in Grayslake. 
Completion date Sept. 30 plus 10 
working days. Ganna Construction, 
Inc., Itasca $4,619,751.05. 



FROM PAGE CI 



Women in business celebrate 



The Grayslake Charter Chapter 
of the American Business Women's 
Association is celebrating its 5th an- 
niversary. The public is invited to 
join ABWA at their annual Halo 
Awards ceremony on Feb. 1 0. 

The Halo Awards honor local 
business people, students and 
teachers, and ABWA members who 



have demonstrated outstanding 
achievements throughout die year. 
The evening will kick off with 
networking and horsd'oeuvres from 
6 to 7 p.m. The awards ceremony 
will begin promptly at 7 p.m. The 
event will be held at the State Bank of 
the Lakes located at 50 Commerce 
Drive in Grayslake. 



GRANTS 

put towards ten watershed projects, 
totaling $383,980, this year. Another 
$10,000 will be put into a contingency 
fund for unforeseen extensions of a 
project, or any other WMB project that 
may surface during die year. 

Projects approved for monetary 
grants and technical assistance by the 
SMC for 2000 include: 

•Des Plaines River Watershed: 
Funded projects include $18,872 to- 
wards Vernon Hills Seavey Drain 
Stream Restoration and Manage- 
ment Project; $18,872 towards Lake 
Zurich's Buffalo Creek Stream 
Restoration and Management Pro- 
ject; $3,000 towards Fremont Town- 
ship's West Shore Park Stream Main- 
tenance Project; and $3,000 towards 
Fremont Township's Sylvan Lake 
Streambank Stabilization Project. 

•Fox River Watershed: $7,827 to- 
wards Grant Township's Long Lake 
Erosion Protection Project; $9,500 to- 
wards Tower Lake's Country Club Es- 
tates Drainage Improvement Project; 
$13,348 towards Lake Villa's Buena 
Avenue Drainage Project. 

•North Branch of the Chicago 
River Watershed: $17,489 towards 
Green Oak's Swale Constniction Pro- 
ject; $9,000 towards Highland Park's 
• tf • -. '■-) . ■ ' » 



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Skokie River Restoration Partner- 
ship. 

•Lake Michigan Watershed: 
$15,790 towards Beach Park's Bull 
Creek Ravine Stabilization Project. 

Over the past eight years, the 
SMC has been able to fund over $9 
million in projects. 

On the local level, some of these 
projects have proven to be a positive 
for residents, with improved 
drainage around homes and on 
streets. On a larger scale, these pro- 
jects have improved the flow and 
quality of water in streams and 
swales, and enhanced stormwater 
facilities that provided wetlands and 



recreational opportunities. 

WMB members establish a crite- 
ria by which these projects are se- 
lected, giving highest consideration 
to those that benefit multiple juris- 
dictions and the major drainage sys- 
tem of the watershed and environ- 
ment. 

"The success of the grant pro- 
gram relies solely on the co-spon- 
sors," said Ward Miller, SMC's exec- 
utive director. "Those municipali- 
ties, townships, community associa- 
tions and drainage districts are work- 
ing on interjurisdictional issues, and 
in die spirit of intergovernmental co- 
operation." 



BAN 



into effect is one that is unfund- 
ed" 

Moore does not appear to be 
worried about how this legislation 
may affect her future re-election. 

"I've been out in front of this is- 
sue for the last eight years," she said. 
"I'm pretty straightforward about 
where I stand on issues, and 1 will 
continue to work on this one be- 
cause 1 truly believe in it." 

Last year, Moore hosted a local 



public hearing on the subject, which 
was attended by several of her House 
colleagues and participants offering 
testimony on both sides. 

"This has been a hotly-debated 
topic for some time, and I've spoken 
with many constituents on both 
sides of die issue," said Moore. 

"I do think people are beginning 
to realize that this is not an issue of 
nostalgia, but onq of public health," 
she concluded. ...... 



LAND 



Habitat restoration- potential is 
great for this area, the committee 
members agreed . The area includes 
a viewpoint from which visitors 
would be able to see for miles. This 
land would link the 1,200-acre Rollins 
Savanna with the Larsen property. 

The land will be purchased at 
$22,000 per acre, or $1.76 million. 

The board will meet later this 
month to approve the purchase. 



PUBLIC NOTICE 

BID REQUEST 

VILLAGE OF FOX LAKE 

301 S RT 59 

FOX LAKE, ILLINOIS 60020 

Sealed bids will be received in the 

office of Ihe Village Clerk, 301 S. Route 

59, Fox Lake, Illinois 60020 until 10 

a.m. on February 22, 2000. For 2000 

Tanker— Pumper Chassis. 

Specifications may be picked up at 
the Village of Fox Lake Maintenance 
Garage, 216 Washington Street, Ingle- 
side, Illinois 60041. 

Mark the Sealed Envelope "Bid For 
Tanker — Pumper Chassis". 

Bids will be open on February 22, 
2000, at 10 a.m. in Ihe Council Cham- 
bers ol the Fox Lake Village Hall. 

The Right is reserved by the Village 
of Fox Lake to reject any or all bids. 
0200A-3141-GEN 
February 4, 2000 



PUBLIC NOTICE ON 

AVON TOWNSHIP ROAD 

DISTRICT BUDGET 

Notice Is hereby given that a Ten- 
tative amended Budget & Appropria- 
tion Ordinance for road purpose of 
Avon Township In the County of Lake, 
State of Illinois, (or the fiscal year be- 
ginning March 1, 2000 and ending 
February 26. 2001 Is on Ills and con- 
veniently available to public Inspection 
at Avon Township Center, 433 E. 
Washington, Round Lake Park, Illinois 
between the hours of 9 a.m. and 4 p.m. 
Monday through Friday. 

Further notice is hereby given that 
the final public hearing and action on 
this ordinance will bo taken at a moot- 
ing to be held al Avon Township Cen- 
ter at 3 p.m. Monday, March 13, 2000. 
Kathleen M. Lennon 
Avon Township Clerk 
0200A-3138-GL/RL 
February 4, 2000 



The committee also discussed a 
possible change in land use for the 
Des Plaines River Wetiands Research 
Project. The county's proposal 
would eliminate the right of way 
where Yorkhouse Rd. was to be ex- 
tended, giving the Forest Preserve 
District the 38 acres. 

Action on die agreement was de- 
ferred to a later meeting. 

Also discussed was a grant from 
•the Illinois Capital Development 
Board in the amount of $1.3 million. 
The grant will provide for a shelter, 
rest rooms, and trails for the Inde- 
pendence Grove Forest Preserve Im- 
provement Project in Libertyville. 

CORRECTION 




Memorabilia of St. Louis Rams 
defensive tackle Jeff Zgonina is 
featured in the display case at 
Carmel High School. Zgonina, a 
former Carmel and Purdue Uni- 
versity standout, was victorious 
along with his team in a bid to 
win the Super Bowl, outscoring 
the Tennessee Titans 23-16. 
—Photo courtesy of the Carmel 
High School Hall of Fame 









\ 












February 4, 2000 



Lakeland Newspapers/ C3 



AT A GLANCE 



A DIGEST OF STORIES MAKING HEADLINES THROUGHOUT OUR REGION 



! 



I 



I 



Resident passenger on fatal flight 

Round Lake Beach— Round Lake Beach resident Allen 
M. Friedmann has been listed among the passengers on Alas- 
ka Airlines flight261, which crashed into the Pacific Ocean off 
the California coast on Jan. 31. 

The plane was heading to San Francisco then on to Seattle 
after leaving Puerto Vallarta, Mexico. 

According to reports from Friedmann's neighbors, he was 
heading for a reunion with his wife when the plane crashed, 
and has two children, ages 15 and four. 

Ex-firefighter busted for child pom 

Mundelein— A former pald-on-call Mundelein firefight- 
er was arrested on a warrant for six counts of possession of 
child pornography. 

Harold C. Davidson, 30, of Mundelein turned himself in to 
police after a search of his computer found several incrimi- 
nating downloaded files. 

Police began their investigation of Davidson in September, 
after a complaint from his ex-wife filtered Its way to the fire 
department. After the complaint reached the Mundelein Po- 
lice Department, they felt the charge was too serious not to 
investigate. 

Police confiscated Davidson's computer! which was in the 
possession of his ex-wife, and obtained a search warrant to 
look at the files. 

Investigators found over 4,000 images on the computer. 
At least 20 of these depicted minors in lewd acts. 

Davidson was released after paying $2,000 on a $20,000 
cash bond. He will appear at the Lake County Circuit Court 
on Feb. 10, 



High school to inquiry grade change 

Grayslake— Grayslake Community High School (GCHS) 
Superintendent and Principal Hizabeth McDonald is con- 
ducting an internal investigation into the matter of a grade 
change for a student. 

The situation, according to McDonald, is that an adminis- 
trator changed the grade without notifying the teacher of the 
change. McDonald said that the administrator has the au- 
thority to change a grade, according to the school code, how- 
ever, the teacher must be notified. 

Administrator M. Ruth Deininger, language arts director, 
explained .that in late November, she began working with the 
student, the parents and the teacher to remedy what seemed 
to be a problem after the parents contacted her. In January, It 
was time to review the progress. 

"I made a hard decision," admitted Deininger. "I would 
have preferred to make the change sooner. But the best thing 
for everyone concerned was to make a change." 

About allegations that the student's grade was changed so 
that the student could participate in a sporting event, 
Deininger said, "The association (of the grade change) with 
the athletic department does not exist. The allegations are 
harmful and insulting." 

District 116 talking deep cuts 

Round Luke — Hundreds turned out for a town meeting 
held by the District 116 Board of Education on Jan. 27 to dis- 
cuss potential program cuts should the referendums fail. . 

With a $9.7 million deficit, the district is facing the possi- 
bility of having the Illinois State Board of Education assign an 
oversight panel to take control of all financial decisions. 

Potential staff cuts include special education coordina- 
tors, bilingual directors, secretaries, teaching assistants and 
athletic directors 

Programs that could'be cut include physical education, 
kindergarten, student council, music, fine arts, social and 
academic clubs, athletics, driver's education, field trips and 
honors and accelerated courses. 

"The only reason we are in debt is because we've held off 
cutting programs, hoping the community would vote yes to a 
referendum," said James Hult, board member. 




Hocus Pocus 

Magician Steve Jordan uses a combination of classic 
comedy and fun Illusions to entertain parents and 
students at Viking Middle School in Gumee Jan. 28 — 
Photo by Klrsten N. Hough 



Developers seek input 

Wadsworth — Developers of the commercial develop- 
ment Wadsworth Crossing are seeking public input on what 
kinds of businesses residents would patronize. 

The three and one-half acre development is to be located at 
Rte, 41 and Wadsworth Rd. in Wadsworth. 

The shopping center will likely be anchored by a branch 
bank on the north side with convenience businsses like a gas 
station, deli and car wash on the south side. 

Potential businesses may include a coffee shop, card and 
gift shop, dry cleaner, hair salon, family restaurant, fine restau- 
rant, florist, full service grocer, gourmet food shop/health food 
store, pharmacy, travel agency and video rental store. 

Visit their web site, www.wadsworthcrossing.com for more 
information or to contact them with responses. 

Fire causes $300,000 in damages 

LlbertyvlUe— A fire in an underground parking garage on 



the 13000 block of Heiden Circle caused the lot's roof to col- 
lapse, crushing three cars, fire officials said. 

Eric Boulton, 42, a resident of the condominium complex 
that the garage serviced, was injured in the fire and later hos- 
pitalized in serious condition. 

At about 2:50 a.m. Boulton tried to extinguish a fire that 
had started in his car, officials said. While he was doing this, . 
he suffered smoke inhalation. 

The car fire spread to two other cars, causing an intense 
heat inside the garage. The heat caused part of the ceiling 
structure to collapse onto the three burning cars. The cause 
of the fire is undetermined. 

In all, about 60 cars were damaged by the heat and smoke 
created by the fire. Total damages from the fire were estimat- 
ed between $200,000 and $300,000. 

Rollins Road project in county plan 

Ingleslde — The days of negotiating over a narrow 
stretch of Rollins Road in Ingleside may be a thing of the past 

The Lake County Board is embarking on a $2.7 million 
project that will improve the "S" curve heading into Fox Lake 
village limits. 

$580,000 of the funding will come from the motor fuel tax, 
$870,000 will come form the county bridge tax. The $X3 mil- 
lion total from these two sources will be matched 

Homeowners group weighs options 

Volo — A homeowners group is considering a lawsuit 
against the Village of Volo regarding the planned Four Oaks 
and Home Depot development. 

The GrantTownship Territory Assn; (GTTA) will meet Feb. 
10. The 7:30 p.m. meeting will be at Lakeland Community 
Bank, Routes 12 and 134. 

The Ingleside-based homeowners group has been watch- 
ing the Route 12 development's progress since Volo board 
members approved it last June. The site is the former Miller 
Farm area. Plans call for Home Depot and hundreds of 
apartments. 

Lake Villa resident fights to regain health 

Lake Villa— Betty Ravagni, a Lake Villa resident, was ex- 
periencing pain and axhaustion about 10 years ago and was 
uncertain about what the causes of her ailments might be. 

Ravagni was diagnosed in 1998 with Fibromyalgia, a con- 
dition associated with widespread aching, stiffness and fa- 
tigue, originating in muscles and soft tissued ■ 

Not wanting to deal with the side effects, she took herself 
off of the medication completely but still continued to search 
for a way to dissolve her symptoms. 

After a few months, Ravagni met Chris lindh, who was 
working at a stand promoting health products at the fair in 
April of 1999. Ravagni explained what her condition was and 
lindh recommended a few health supplements that might 
help and a nutrition seminar. 

According to Ravagni, she immediately started a new diet 
of more protein and water, less carbohydrates and fat, along 
with health supplements. 

The new diet and supplements made a drastic change in 
her life for the better. 

State treasurer visits school 

Round Lake Beach— State Treasurer Judy BaarTopinka 
made a visit with her Scottish Terrier to Round Lake Beach 
Elementary School on Jan. 27, to personally thank sixth- 
graders for sending her letters. 

The students went on a letter writing campaign to state of- 
ficials to finalize their studies of the Illinois government 
handbook. 

"Your questions were the most original questions I've got- 
ten in the whole state of Illinois. Congratulations for being so 
thoughtful," she praised. 

Topinka is the first woman in Illinois history to serve as 
state treasurer, and the first Republican to be elected in 32 
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C4/ Lakeland Newspapers 



OPINIONS 



February 4,2000 



Lakeland Newspapers 



William H. Schroeder 

Publisher 



Neal Tucker 

Executive Editor/ 
Operations Manager 



Robert Warde 

Managing Etlilor 



30 South Whitney St., Grays lake, Illinois 60030 
Tel: (847) 223-8161. E-mail: edlt@lnd.com 



EDITORIALS 

High tax rank 
dubious 'honor' 

It should come as no surprise to property owners that Lake 
County is a high tax area. The question is how high? Now we 
know. Caution. Pass the aspirin. 
In a study compiled by the Taxpayers' Federation of Illinois, 
a reputable watchdog group, for 1997 residential property taxes 
paid in 1998, the highest average household cost— $5,183— was in 
Lake County. By comparison, the lowest was $315 in Pulaski 
County, in the southern most part of the state. 

The household tax burden is a comparatively new benchmark. 
It is derived by taking the average per capita residential tax burden 
and multiplying by four to represent a typical household. 

As analyists from the Taxpayers' Federation pointed out, the 16 
to 1 ratio between Lake and Pulaski counties illustrates the great 
disparity in property wealth throughout Illinois. The disparity, in a 
nutshell, is a major reason why legislators have such a difficult 
time hammering out equitable formulas for state aid to public 
schools. • 

Lake County's collar county neighbors, DuPage, McHenry, 
Kane and Kendall round out the top five counties having more 
than a 3 to 1 ratio of residential property tax extensions to proper- 
ty tax extensions provided by any other single category. 

No small comfort to Lake County taxpayers is the fact that 
there are two other counties, Grundy in the collar southwest of 
Chicago, and DeWitt in the center of the state, with a higher per 
capita tax attributable to schools. Latest figures available from 
1997 showed a per capita property school tax of $1,164.59 for 
Grundy and $1,159.49 cents for DeWitt compared to Lake County 
in third place with $1,103.36. Statewide, the school share per capi- 
ta average is $717.36. 

The No. 1 ranking, to be sure, is a dubious distinction. What it 
shows, among other things, is that Lake County is a wealthy area, 
albeit an expensive place to live, but also the possessor of re- 
sources that are the envy of a majority of Illinois counties. With the 
high percentage of household income going for taxes, it behooves 
every taxpayer in the county to make sure, moveover demand, 
that value in public education and services be received. 

Accepting less should be unthinkable, in our opinion. 

Moore re-ignites 
leaf flash point 

State Rep. Andrea Moore (R- Libertyville), noted in her days 
as a member of the Lake County Board for frequently plow- 
ing into unchartered political seas unfettered by storm re- 
ports and incomplete nagivational charts, has dredged up 
reminders of the past with plans to ban leaf burning in Cook, Lake 
and McHenry counties. 

Ignoring the furor caused in west Lake County last summer 
when former colleagues on the County Board briefly considered 
but wisely dropped a leaf burning ban proposal for unincorporat- 
ed areas, Moore is revisiting an explosive subject. That's putting it 
mildly. Moore represents the 61st District of mostly LibertyvUIe 
Township and Warren (Gurnee) Township that puts her safely out 
of the treacherous shoals where the burning ban was debated 
eight months ago. You have to wonder if Moore would be pushing 
a leaf burning ban if her district included Fremont, Grant, Antioch 
and Lake Villa townships where homeowners passionately argued 
that a leaf burning prohibition was impractical nonsense. 

One of the significant features of last year's debate was that op- 
ponents successfully drained away emotion and debunked al- 
leged health menaces advanced by environmentalists. A strong 
practical argument against a burning ban was advanced by town- 
ship highway commissioners who pointed out that the county 
proposal amounted to an unfunded mandate because they were 
targeted to handle leaf disposal. Come to think of it, the General 
Assembly has a well grounded reputation for dumping unfunded 
mandates on "lesser" forms of government. 

Some of the wiser heads on the Lake County Board would per- 
form a welcome service if they could take Andrea Moore aside and 
teU her how they thrashed out the subject pretty well last year. The 
county already has good guidelines for leaf burning and a work- 
able system that addresses both health and disposal needs. Why is 
Rep. Moore pouring gasoline on a question that already has been 
answered? 




VIEWPOINT 



Crowded 10th race begins to sort out 



With approximately six 
weeks to primary elec- 
tion day, the sorting 
out process in the 
crowded field of candidates for the 
Republican nomination for Con- . 
gress from the 10th Dist. is beginning 
to take place. 

Because of where a majority of 
the candidates live, most of the early 
skirmishing has.beenon the Cook 
County side of the district that runs 
along the North Shore to the Wis- 
consin state line and reaches into • 
Libertyville Township and parts of 
Arlington Heights. 

That leaves GOP voters in the 
Lake County portion of the 10th, and 
they hold a solid majority of regis- 
tered voters, with a unique role in 
deciding who will be the next U.S. 
representative. 

Despite their personal prefer- 
ence, few Republicans at this point 
are arguing that Mark Steven Kirk, 
41, the boyish chief of staff a decade 
ago under retiring Congressman 
John Porter, isn't in the top tier of as- 
pirants. Kirk knows the district, 
holds a law degree, has Navy Re- 
serve service, and his fiscal conserv- 
ative/social moderate views fit a dis- 
trict with decidedly more liberal 
views than conservative west Lake 
County voters served by Congress- 
man Phil Crane (R-Waueonda). In 
short, Mark Kirk is the "son" of John 
Porter, although the respected law- 
maker has not endorsed his former 
aide. Insiders say Porter has no in- 
tentions of confening "heir appar- 
ent" status on Kirk. Besides a pen- 
chant for embellishing his resume, 
the knock on Kirk is that he doesn't 
possess necessary financial firepow- 
er. GOP bigwigs who want to see a 
seamless transfer of power are 
promising that Kirk won't run short 
at the bank. 

Andrew Hochberg, Highland 
Park businessman and a former De- 
mocrat, has thrust himself into the 
list of leading GOP contenders with 
a relentless spending binge, mostly 
TV commercials. If anything, Hock- 
berg's effort will be a test of the pow- 
er of television advertising. 
Hochberg will appeal to indepen- 
dents and maybe even some De- 
mocrats. But they don't vote in the 
primary. 

Shawn Margaret Donnelley of 
Libertyville can't be counted out of 
the upper level for two reasons: She's 
the only woman in the race and she 
can go toe-to-toe in me spending 
department with any of her oppo- 
nents. Despite Donnelley's youth 
(age 30), none of the candidates can 




BILL SCHROEDER 

Publisher 



top Donnelley's experience in con- 
stituent service and legislative lob- 
bying. That's been her job with the 
famous Donnelley family printing 
business. Disarming and gracious, 
Donnelley figures to be a force in a 
district that is partial to women in 
public office. 

As mayor of Northbrook, Mark 
Damisch is fairly well known to vot- 
ers on the Cook County side. Too 
well known, his detractors say. Be- 
cause of Northbrook's ballooning 
budget, Damisch will have some ex- 
plaining to do on his spending phi- 
losophy. Also, he has been tip-toeing 
on gun control questions, leaving 
himself on both sides of the issue in 
the eyes of many. 

On two uraditionai GOP posi- 
tions, reigning in the federal govern- 
ment and cutting taxes, CPA and tax 
attorney John Cox of Glenview 
stands out. Cox, an active Catholic 
churchman, doesn't hide his pro-life 
views, but his campaign strategy is 
to stress job creation and solid em- 
ployment in the private sector as the 
best means of providing affordable 
health insurance. More than any 
other Republican, Cox offers the 
most distinct difference between the 
Democratic nominee, State Rep. 
Lauren Beth Gash (D-Highland 
Park) who is running unopposed. 

After Kirk, Donnelley, Cox and 
Hochberg, the field thins out rapidly. 

The campaign of Lake Bluff's 
Thomas Lachner, a former state rep- 
resentative, is having a tough time 
getting off the ground. Others who 
will be on the GOP ballot include 
professional wrestler Jon Stewart of 
Deerfield, drug abuse counselor 
Scott Phelps of Mt. Prospect, James 
Goulka of Kenilworth, a former En- 
cyclopedia Britannica executive; 
John Guy, who wants to raise the 
minimum wage to $10, and Terry 
Gladman of Glencoe. 

This will be me field, barring any 
further drop outs like Winnetka 
businessman Tom Eilers who quit to 



support Goulka. 

Boulder adventure 

Wade Beane, a young profes- 
sional in adventure education, has 
turned boulderlng into one of the 
hottest activities offered at Hastings 
LakeYMCA. Bouldering is learning 
basic and advanced rock climbing in 
a controlled setting, typically an in- 
door environment. In a 1,000 square 
foot room with an eight foot ceiling, 
Wade has created a setting where 
beginning to advanced climbers can 
train. Synthetic materials are used. 
The boulder room at the Y in Lake 
Villa even has an overhang. 

Going Main Street 

A transplanted Nebraskan, Kan- 
dalyn Hahn, has accepted the as- 
signment of breathing new life into 
Waukegan's downtown rcvitaliza- 
tion. Hahn, who most recently was a 
staff aide for Chicago's Six Comers 
rehab, is going to use Main Street 
program techniques employed suc- 
cessfully in Libertyville and 
Mundelein as models. Hahn said 
growing up in Nebraska prepared 
her for Lake County's cutting winter 
winds and severe temperature 
swings. Technically, Hahn is execu- 
tive director of the Waukegan Down- 
town Assn., which will be supplant- 
ed by Main Street when approval is 
attained. 

Stevenson growing 

Stevenson High School, Lake 
County's largest in enrollment with 
3,782 students, has quite a way to go 
before ranking with the largest 
schools in the nation even though 
an enrollment of 4,500 Is projected 
for 2005. There's a technical high 
school in Indianapolis, Ind., with 
enrollment in excess of 6,000. For 
many years, enrollment at Chicago's 
LaneTech ran about 4,000. Years 
ago, before demographic shifts in 
the Chicago area, J. Sterling Morton 
in Cicero was around 5,000. Steven- 
son will be pushing out the walls 
again this spring, this time for a 
41,000 square foot addition. 

One man's family 

We should have known better . 
when a golden retriever puppy took 
up residence in our home. Retriev- 
ers are born to retrieve. Soiled socks 
from the laundry basket, our neigh- 
bor's newspaper, banana peels from 
the trash compactor, old garage 
brooms, a shoe from the closet. It's 
all the same to Sadie. Help, help, 
golden fans. Are they all alike? 



i 



February^ 2000 



OPINIONS 



Lakeland Newspapers / C 5 



••Xl 



PARTY LINES 



Warning labels often wacky 



PARTY LINES, THE LAKELAND.NEWSPAPERS' COLUMN OF POLITICAL OPINION, 

IS PREPARED FROM STAFF REPORTS. 

Leafblad facing force 
of regular GOP, builders 



Skilled political strategist Fred 
Blgham is directing traffic 
for Moll! e Larson in her at- 
tempt to unseat County 
Board Rep. Larry Leafblad (R- 
Higliland Lake). 

Bigham, a resident of Island 
Lake and former village trustee, in 
the past has been allied with regular 
Republican causes which rely on 
support from the building industry. 
Leafblad is an independent Republi- 
can and a vocal advocate for open 
space and controlled growth. 

The contested District 6 race 
also includes Robert Powers of 
Round Lake Beach, who has been 
active in Avon Township GOP activi- 
ties. 

A decade ago, Bigham was in- 
volved with the team that upset 
Avon Township Supervisor Nor- 
man Geary, Leafblad's father-in- 
law. Geary, a leader on the econo- 
my bloc of the County Board and a 
former county chair, did not run 
for reelection after his township 
defeat. 

Because of his position as 
chairman of the County Board's 
committee on planning, building 
and zoning, Leafblad said he's been 
targeted by the building industry 
and developers. 

Bigham is a respected political 
consultant and has done work for 
the federal government. 

System aids Gash 

State Rep. Lauren Beth Gash 

(D-Highland Park), who always has 
portrayed herself outside the sys- 
tem, can be thankful that the system 
cleared her path for a nomination 
for Congress from the 10th District. 

Gash's only opponent, radio 
station employee Kevin Q. Harvey, 
43, of Glencoe, was knocked off the 
primary ballot by state elections of- 
ficials for an insufficient number of 
valid signatures on his nominating 
petitions. Harvey, a newcomer, sim- 
ply shrugged and said he would 




Leafblad: (R) Faces 
two pranged threat. 




Thomas: (R) Still kick- 
, ing, but behind in race 

work for Gash this November. 

Field thinner 

As predicted, the Republican 
ranks for a 10th District nominating 
are thinning out With the campaign 
now in the "sorting out" phase, Win- 
netka businessman, lorn EUers 
dropped out in favor of Jim Goulka 
of Kenilworth. With most of the orig- 
inal 12-person GOP field coming 
from die Cook County side of the 
North Shore district, more drop outs 
can be expected. The 10th runs 
along Lake Michigan and extends 
into parts of Libertyville and Arling- 
ton Heights. 

Unknown in race 

A Mundelein resident and po- 



litical unknown is expected to be on 
the ballot March 21 as nominee 
from the Reform Party for Congress 
from the 10th District. John D. Oro- 
rato, 40, has decriminalization of 
marijuana as one of his campaign 
planks. He Is employed as an insur- 
ance analyst 

Sheriff backs Rathje 

Judge Bob Thomas' popularity 
during his professional football 
playing days isn't rubbingoff on his 
efforts to gain the Republican nomi- 
nation for an Illinois Supreme Court 
judgeship. Thomas, a place kicker 
for the Chicago Bears 20 years ago, is 
running behind Justice Louis Rath- 
je who has picked up a flock of law 
enforcement endorsements Includ- 
ing Lake County Sheriff Gary Del 
Re. Thomas and Rathje both hail 
from DuPage County. Rathje holds 
the high court seat through appoint- 
ment 

Price is right 

Lt. Gov. Corinne Wood is 
backing Republican GesUle Price 
of Lake Forest all the way to take 
back her old job, representing the 
59th District in the Illinois General 
Assembly now held by a Democrat 
Wood, also a Lake Forest resident, 
will be guest speaker Sunday, Feb. 6 
at a reception for Price at Harrison 
House, Lake Bluff. The 59th Includes 
part of Libertyville, Lake Bluff, Lake v 
Forest, North Chicago and' 
Waukegan's south side. 

Free pizza 

Dee Beaubien of Barrington 
is tossing a free pizza party for sup- 
porters of her husband, State Rep. 
Mark Beaubien, running for re- 
election in the west Lake County 
52nd District Friends are requested 
to bring their appetites to the Wau- 
conda American Legion Hall, Satur- 
day, Feb. 19. Serving will be from 
5:30 to 8 p.m. 



I bought some One-a-Day vita- 
min pills. The directions on the 
bottle said, "Take two a day." 
I took a coat to the One-Hour 
Cleaners. They said they could have 
it ready in five hours. 

And over at One-Hour Photos • 
the clerk explained, "We're way be- 
hind today. Come back for your pic- 
tures in six hours." 

Is this a wacky world or what? 
Consider the following label instruc- 
tions on various products: 

On a Sears hair dryen "Do not 
use while sleeping." 

On a bar of Dial soap, directions: 
"Use like regular soap." 

On Swanson frozen dinners: 
"Serving suggestion; defrost" 

On a hotel-provided shower cap: 
"Fits one head." 

On packaging for a Rowenta 
Iron: "Do not iron clothes on body." 

I found those wacky warning la- 
bels while grazing on the Internet ■ 
They appeared under the heading, 
"In case you needed further proof 
that the human race is doomed, 
here are some actual label instruc- 
tions on consumer goods." 

And I came across the following 
operating directions while reading 
the owner's manuals for our two 
cars, directions obviously not aimed 
at rocket scientists. 

For our big Mercury: 

To operate, start the engine. 

Speedometer The speedometer 
tells you how many miles per hour 
your vehicle is moving. 

On slippery roads, drive more 
slowly than you normally would. 

Finding the spare tire: The spare 
is stored in the trunk. tAnd all this 
time I've been looking for it in the 
glove box.) 

And from the owner's manual 
for pur little Nissan: 

In third gear, dp not exceed 80 
miles per hour. 

The gas gauge indicates the ap- 
proximate fuel level in the tank. Re- 
fill the fuel tank before the gauge 
registers empty. 




THE 

PFARR 

CORNER 

JerryPfarr 



If you have a flat tire, stop the 
vehicle. (Oh, really? We never would 
have thought of that) 

The Washington Post newspaper 
a few years ago ran a contest in 
which readers were asked to come 
up with abs urd (but fake) warning ■ 
labels for common products. 

The judges loved one particular 
entry for its wonderful idiocy. On a 
cardboard windshield sun shade: 
"Warning, do not drive with sun 
shade in place." 

"We were going to make it a 
winner," the judges said, "until we 
discovered that it wasn't made 
up." 

The runners-up included: 

On an infant's bathtub: "Do hot 
throw the baby out with the bath 
water." 

On a roll of Life Savers: "Not for 
use as a flotation device." 

On a disposable razor "Do not 
use this product during an earth- 
quake." 

On a piano: "Harmful or fatal if 
swallowed." 

And the winner was: 

On a cup of McDonald's coffee, 
"Allow to cool before applying to 
groin area." 

And here a few more wacky 
warning labels actually being used: 

On a cough medicine for chil- 
dren: "Do not drive car or operate 
machinery." 

OnNytol (a sleep aid), "Warn- 
ing: May cause drowsiness." 

On a Korean kitchen knife: 
"Warning, keep out of children." 

On an American Airlines packet 
of nuts, "Instructions: Open packet 
eat nuts." 



Letters welcome 



Letters to the editor are welcome. They should be on topics 

of general interest, approximately 250 words or less. 

All letters must be signed, and contain a home address 

and telephone number. The editor reserves the right 

to condense all letters. 



LETTERS TO THE EDITOR 



Continued operation of ski hills important to Thelen 



I am sending you this letter to 
correct some of the misinfor- 
mation that has been given to 
the newspapers about Wilmot 
Mountain Ski Hills. Walter Stopa Sr. 
started Wilmot Mountain and his 
family has operated it for more than 
half a century. I was contacted by 
one of the Stopas to ask if we would 
be interested in purchasing the ski 
hills. I was told that Steven 
Schwarzbach and some other ' 
lawyers, from the Chicago area, were 
interested in purchasing the proper- 
ty. My family and I were concerned 
that the area would fall into contin- 
ued hard times and be lost to the 
community. 

The continued operation of the 
ski hills is important to my family for 
several reasons: l.We have family, 
friends and employees that work at 
the ski hills over the winter months; 
2. The ski hills are very Important to 
our community not only financially ^ 
but socially; 3. Three generations of 
our family ski at Wilmot Ski Hills and 
we want future generations to have 
that opportunity; 4. Our father and 
Walter Stopa, Sr. were good neigh- 
bors and friends while Walter Sr. was 
alive; and 5. Purchasing the hills was 
hopefully a way for us to earn some 
money while helping the communi- 



ty and provide the Stopa family with 
an opportunity to continue running 
the ski hills. 

Thelen Sand and Gravel, Inc. 
will not purchase the ski hills. The- 
len Sand and Gravel, Inc. nor the 
Thelen family has ever had any in- 
terest in taking down the ski hills. 

The Thelen family believes that 
the ski hills are an icon of our com- 
munity. Our family want to purchase 
the ski hill property and lease the ski 
hills back to one of the Stopa family 
members. The Stopa lease will make 
it possible for the Wilmot Ski Hills to 
remain an icon for our community. 

Steve TJtelen 
Antioch 

Still bulldozing 

Four years ago Lake County resi- 
dents voted for controlled growth. 
The legacy of urban sprawl created by 
"Bulldozer" Bob Depke Is still im- 
pacting us today with over-crowded 
schools, clogged roads and higher 
taxes. "Bulldozer Bob" has returned to 
find candidates who can be bought 
by "Homebuilders" money and they 
have apparently found their man, 
Mayor Jim Pappas of Fox Lake. 

Why should residents in District 
5 be leery? Remember our last Dep- 
ke backed County Board representa- 



tive Ed "There's nothing I can do" 
Fojtik?The sequel is in the wings, 
Jim "there is nothing I can do" Pap- 
pas II. 

The facts are clear: 

Bonnie Thomson Carter went to 
Springfield to try change the formu- 
la by which developers pay school 
impact fees. The "Homebuilders" 
defeated it 

Bonnie helped change quality 
wetland buffers from 30 feet to 100 
feet She understands the environ- 
mental impacts development has on 
the quality of our lakes. 

She has voted against the filling 
of high quality wetlands so as to not 
increases downstream flooding. 

Bonnie secured a $5 million dol- 
lar federal grant for flood relief pro- 
jects. 

During her term over a thou- 
sand acres have been purchased by 
the Lake County Forest Preserve In 
the Fox River Basin. 

Bonnie pushed for county's zon- 
ing maps to reflect one acre because 
"that is our true character of District 
5." 

Bonnie brought Federal, State 
and local agencies together to 
discuss the impact electric power 
plants have on our aquifers. 
There arc no longer any planned 



for District 5. 

Bonnie Thomson Carter does 
not take political contributions from 
developers. Bonnie will play hard- 
ball with developers and will fight to 
preserve our quality of life in District 
5. 

Can you now believe Mayor 
Pappas will? 1 do not My vote is with 
Bonnie. 

Suzanne Harris 
Ingleside 

Life in Cuba 

Attorney General Janet Reno 
wants to send 6 year old Elian Gon- 
zalez back to Cuba as soon as possi- 
ble — "so that he can get on with his 
life." Reno desires to sacrifice Elian's 
quality of life at the altar of what she 
can accomplish in a hurry. Sending 
the child back to a totalitarian dicta- 
torship, to live a life under brutal op- 
pression, is a complete betrayal of 
Elian's best interests. 

Reno ignores the fact that life in 
Cuba is hell. Cubans suffer an exis- 
tence filled with standard Marxist- 
Leninist poverty, devoid of human 
rights. Beyond a comprehensive lack 
of freedom of religion, press and 
speech, Cuba endures a repression 
where Fidel Castro programs each 
citizen as to what they should think, 



feel and believe. Cuban human 
rights organizations have docu- 
mented cold-blooded executions 
and at least one thousand political 
prisoners languishing in subhuman 
conditions because of their failure to 
live at Dictator Castro's whim. 

It is tyranny that thousands of 
Cubans have fled or attempted to 
flee. Moreover, itwas this future In ' 
Cuba that Elian's mother died at- 
tempting to escape. It should shock 
the conscience of any American that 
our government would frustrate the 
intent of a dead parent, who only 
wanted to give her son a chance at a 
better life — a life of freedom. 

Reno would like Americans to 
stop questioning our government's 
decision to send Elian back to Cuba. 
Because of the Clinton administra- 
tion's slipshod review of this case, 
Americans should scrutinize the de- 
cision. Specifically, the Clinton ad- 
ministration has failed to investigate 
the voluntariness of Elian's father in 
his stated wishes, which were made 
from Castro's pulpit. The only hope 
for a just result is a review by Ameri- 
can courts, which should determine, 
in die interest of human rights, the 
best interests of Elian Gonzalez. 

Peter S.Karlovics 

Gurnee 



. 




MINDING 
YOUR OWN 
BUSINESS 

Don Taylor 



Seven traps 
to avoid in 
your business 



If you ask 100 troubled busi- 
ness owners why they struggle 
to stay in business, you'll get 
100 different answers. If you 
ask 100 business owners who have 
failed why they failed you'll hear all 
the reasons except the real ones. - 

An objective analysis of many 
failing businesses will reveal that 
most mistakes owners make fall 
into a few common areas. While 
this list isn't comprehensive, it may 
help you avoid some pitfalls. 

Avoiding the traps 

The wrong location trap. This is 
a classic mistake for many of small 
business owners. Retailers will pick 
a location based on low rental rates 
or immediate availability. Service 
business owners may select a very 
prestigious office location to im- 
press future customers and con- 
sume all their capital in the first 
year's rent. In choosing the right lo- 
cation, consider the following items 
as a minimum: your target cus- 
tomers, traffic patterns and flow, 
parking, safety issues, competition, 
total lease or purchase costs, room 
for growth and consistency with the 
image you wish to project. 

The wrong partner trap. AH too 
often, going into business with a 
friend means the end of a good 
friendship. Friendships are based 
on emotions, while businesses op- 
erate on accurate, straightforward 
information. I'm not saying it can't 
work, but most fail. If you must take 
on a partner put the entire partner- 
ship in writing. Tips for springing 
this trap: 1) Find someone who bal- 
ances out your strengths and weak- 
nesses, 2) Make sure your partner is 
a good communicator and is coop- 
erative, and 3) Look for a past histo- 
ry of success. 

The sloppy records trap. If your 
idea of record keeping is a box for 
bills and a checkbook you're about 
to fall in the pit. Adequate records 
are a prerequisite to success. You'll 
need good records for the Internal 
Revenue Service, for future borrow- 
ing needs and to know how you're 
doing. The minimum records in- 
clude tracking sales, expenses, ac- 
counts receivable, accounts 
payable, payroll activity, a fixed as- 
set schedule and a record of the 
money you withdraw from the 
business. 

The financial management 
trap. Once you have all the records 
you need, you still must combine 
them to get a good picture of what 
is happening in your business. Fi- 
nancial statements — income state- 
ments, balance sheets and cash 
flow statements— bring all your 
records into a format that you can 
easily compare with previous state- 
ments to see how you're doing. 

The wrong price trap. The right 
price is found by analyzing your 
competition, costs and the value 
you deliver. If you ignore any of 
these elements, you'll be caught in 
' the wrong price trap. You must cov- 
er all your costs with your price, but 
you may still be undersold by com- 
panies who control their costs 
more effectively. So eliminate 
waste, focus on delivering some- 
thing extra and charge what you're 
worth. 

The wrong people trap. Want to 
fail fast? Surround yourself with 
people who know less than you do. 
Pay them poorly, give them mini- 
mal training and spend a lot of time 

Please see TAYLOR/ C7 



BUSM 




C6 /Lakeland Newspapers 



February 4, 2000 



CDW 



Internet strategy, addition of sales 
staff keep firm on growth tear 



CDW Computer Centers Inc., 
the Vernon Hills-based distributor of 
computers and related products, an- 
nounced record sales and earnings 
for the fourth quarter and year end- 
ed Dec. 31. 

Net sales for the fourth quarter 
increased 55 percent to $741.3 mil- 
lion from $477.2 million in the same 
period of 1998. Net income for the 
quarter rose 63 percent to $29.9 mil- 
lion from $18.3 million in the fourth 
quarter of 1998. Diluted earnings per 
share increased 60 percent to $0.67 
in the fourth quarter of 1999 from 
$0.42 in the same period of 1998. 

Net sales for the year ended Dec. 
31 increased 48 percent to $2,561 bil- 
lion from $1,733 billion in the year 
ended 1998. Net income for the year 
was $98.1 million, a 49 percent in- 
crease over $65.8 million reported in 



1998. Diluted earnings per share of 
$2.22 in 1999 increased 47 percent 
from $1.51 in 1998. 

All earnings per share amounts 
reflect the 2-for- 1 stock split effected 
in the form of a stock dividend and 
was paid on May 19. 

"CDW is proud of our coworkers' 
extraordinary efforts that produced 
record results for both the fourth 
quarter and year. Our successful 
business model integrates our rela- 
tionship-based account managers, 
web site, customer service and dis- 
tribution capabilities in the business 
marketplace, which together enables 
us to gain market share, while pro- 
ducing superior financial results. We 
are confident that this 'clicks and 
people' strategy with a high level of 
service is right for the future. As we 
enter 2000, we are expanding our 



FOURTH-QUARTER HIGHLIGHTS 

"• Twenty-sixth consecutive quarter of sequential sales growth 
as a public company 

• 55 percent growth in net sales 

• Commerciafsales grow 65 percent, exceed $690 million 

• Net income increases 63 percent 

• EPS increases 60 percent 

• Sales account managers increase to 798 

• Direct web sales increase 161 percent to $53.8 million 

• Named to Fortune's 1 00 Best Companies to Work For in 
America 



salesforce, e-business activities, 
branding efforts and distribution ca- 
pacity to perpetuate growth in mar- 
ket share and profits." Michael P. 
Krasny, Chairman and Chief Execu- 
tive Officer 

Add-on boards/memory, data 
storage devices, notebooks, net- 
working and communication and 
desktop computers were the fastest- 
growing product categories — all with 
sales growth rates exceeding 50 per- 
cent. Notebook computers, which 



remained the largest product cate- 
gory at 21 percent of net sales, In- 
creased 71 percent in net sales dol- 
lars compared to the fourth quarter 
of 1998. Desktop computers, which 
include servers, increased over 53 
percent. "Product availability was 
good throughout the quarter with no 
significant product allocation is- 
sues," said Gregory Zeman, CDWs 

Please see CDW/C7 




A lengthy construction project along Milwaukee Ave. south of Rte. 60 in Vernon Hills is now com- 
plete. The international headquarters for the American Hotel Register Company is a sleek, 201,500 
square-foot building in the Continental Executive Parkway. Established more than 100 years ago, 
the company is one of the world's leading suppliers of hotel and healthcare products. 

McShane Construction completes 
company's Vernon Hills headquarters 



Jeffrey A. Raday, President of Mc- 
Shane Construction Corporation has 
announced that the firm has com- 
pleted the new five-story, 201,500- 
square-foot international headquar- 
ters for American Hotel Register 
Company. 

The new corporate headquar- 
ters, 100 South Milwaukee Ave., is lo- 
cated within the Continental Execu- 
tive Parke In Vernon Hills. 

Teaming up with project archi- 
tect, Archideas Inc., McShane deliv- 



ered the state-of-the-art facility on a 
fast-tract construction schedule, 
completing the project eight weeks 
prior to the scheduled occupancy 
date. 

American Hotel Register Compa- 
ny, established over a century ago, is 
a leading industry supplier of hotel 
and healthcare products. The com- 
pany's one-stop buying concept has 
seen steady growth, allowing the firm 
to expand its services locally, nation- 
ally and internationally over the past 



50 years. 

"Our spectacular new corporate 
headquarters represent the second 
project that McShane has completed 
at our Vernon Hills campus," noted 
Thomas Leahy, Executive Vice Presi- 
dent, American Hotel Register Com- 
pany. "We are extremely appreciative 
and highly impressed with the firm's 
ability to provide us with a quality 
building while maintaining our bud- 
get requirements and meeting our 
fast-track construction schedule." 



Chamber holds installation dinner 



The Buffalo Grove Area Cham- 
ber of Commerce held an Installa- 
tion Dinner Gala on at Concorde 
Banquets in Kildeer. Nearly 150 
Chamber members attended the 
event, which featured a sumptuous 
dinner and entertainment provided 
by comedian Chuck Salvo and Lou 
Loiben & Personalities Inc. The 
members were also treated to a 
montage of 1999 event photos which 
was provided by Bob Kern of One 
Hour MotoPhoto. 

The Chamber installed its Offi- 



cers and Directors for 2000. They are: 
President, Michael Jonas, Coupon- 
Cash Saver; Executive VP, Dr. Eric 
Smith, Smith Back & Neck pain Cen- 
ter; Vice President, Brian Rubin, 
Kovitz Shifrin & Waitzman; Secre- 
tary, Angela Fink, Hilton Garden Inn; 
Treasurer, Steve Panitch, KJ Direct; 
Immediate Past President, Ronald 
Jonas, Harris Bank BG. 

The Directors are: Michael 
Datler, Kamensky & Rubenstein; 
Stu Choen, Lou Malnati's Pizzeria; 
Richard Drazner, R, J. Drazner & As- 



sociates; Mark Esposito, Mama Jo 
Jo's Pastabilities; John Green, 
Grand Prix Car Wash & Ground- 
work Ltd; Sara Herman, Coldwell 
Banker; Ron Jess, United Specialty 
Advertising; Chris Klekamp, 
Stevenson High School; Greg Lund- 
gren, Hilton Garden Inn; Jan 
Obrand, In Working Order; Alan 
Perlow, Wentworth Graphics; Amy 
Perlow, Muscular Dystrophy Asso- 
ciation; Tim Schryvcr, Siemens 
Building Technologies— Landsis 
Division. 



Company 
awarded 
software 
contract 



MasterChart Inc., headquar- 
tered in Bannockburn, announced 
that Sherman Health Systems, lo- 
cated in Elgin, has signed a beta 
agreement to install the company's 
Microsoft CE-based prescription 
writing application. Sherman will 
initially install the new application, 
called the Practical Portable Script 
Writer, in their ambulatory envi- 
ronment. 

The Practical Portable Script 
Writer will allow the physicians to 
create electronic prescriptions, val- 
idate scripts against plan-specific 
formularies, check drug interaction 
data, generate patient advisory 
leaflets and improve refill manage- 
ment. 

During Phase II of the deploy- 
ment, Sherman will migrate the 
use of the PP Script Writer to their 
inpatient physician population. 
Sherman Health Systems is an in- 
tegrated delivery network an- 
chored by a 250-bed hospital. 

MasterChart is said to be a 
world leader in developing Win- 
dows CE-based applications for the 
healthcare marketplace. In addi- 
tion to prescription writing capa- 
bilities, the Practical Portable also 
provides solutions for dictation, vi- 
tals capture and medical content 
management such as patients' 
medical records and reference 
data. 

According to Steve Chapman, 
Chief Information Officer at Sher- 
man Hospital, MasterChart's CE- 
based solutions fill a great need in 
the healthcare industry. "This new 
CE based prescription writing ca- 
pability will make our physicians' 
lives easier, make them more pro- 
ductive, and enhance patient safe- 
ty," Chapman said. 

MasterChart is a fast-growing 
technology company that develops 
and markets systems to enhance 
clinician productivity and Improve 
patient care through more effective 
clinical data management. 







February 4, 2000 



BUSINESS 







Lakeland Newspapers/ C7 



BUSINESS DIGEST 



Harris Bank sponsors forecast round table 

Harris Bank Lake Forest will host an Economic Forecast 2000 Breakfast 
Round Table on Feb. 9; from 7:30-8:30 a.m. The round table session will be 
held at the Deer path Inn, 255 East Illinois Rd. Lake Forest. Leading the dis- 
cussion will be David Mead, Vlce.President and Chief Investment officer of 
Harris Trust. The event is free and open to the public. Reservations are re- 
quired and can be made by calling 247-21 1 1 or via e-mail to Peg.Tool@har- 
risbank.com. 

Workshop details first-time home purchases 

' First-time home buyers, confronted with numerous concerns such as 
credit-worthiness, down-payment requirements and general affordability 
can attend a workshop sponsored by Harris Bank Libertyville to learn the 
basics on getting started. The "HomeSeekers" workshop will be held on 
Feb. 10 at 6 p.m. at Harris Bank Libertyville, 354 North Milwaukee Ave, The 
workshop reviews basics on low down-payment loans— as low as 3 per- 
cent—various loan packages and the tax advantages of home ownership. 
Discussion will also include tips on available homes in the Libertyville area. 
Tara Schoenfeld and Cindy Sigurdsson from the bank will be the presen- 
ters. Seating is limited; to reserve seats at the free workshop, call Peg Tool 
at 247-2 111. 

Transporting group seeks proposals 

The Chicago Area Transporting Study announces the call for project 
proposals for the fiscal year 2001 Congestion Mitigation and Air Quali- 
ty Improvement Program. Funds will be programmed in northeastern 
Illinois for projects that primarily reduce congestion and related air pol- 
lution. Examples of the types of projects that may be funded are transit 
service improvements, traffic signal interconnects and bicycle/pedes- 
trian projects that eliminate automobile trips. See the Web site for a 
complete list. To receive a project submittal booklet, write, call or fax 
the CATS Communications Division, 300 West Adams, Chicago, IL 
60606. Phone 793-3469, fax 793^3481. The submittal booklet and forms 
are also posted on their website at http://www.catsmpo.com 
/progs/cmaq. 

Firstar announces increase in earnings 

Firstar Corporation announced that its fourth quarter 1999 net in- 
come, before merger- related charges, reached a record level of $324.9 
million. This represents a 16.3 percent increase over the fourth quarter 
1998 net income. Fourth quarter 1999 diluted earnings per share, before 
merger-related charges, was S0.33, a 17.9 percent increase over the 
same quarter in 1998. For the year 1999, net income, before merger^e- 
lated charges, was $1,253 billion or 18.8 percent over 1998. Diluted earn- 
ings per share, before merger-related charges was $1.25 per share com- 
pared to $1.07 per share in 1998, a 16.8 percent increase. This an- 
nouncement was made by Jerry A. Grundhofer, president and chief ex- 
ecutive officer of Firstar Corporation. 



Architect, designer join Libertyville firm 



Architect Carlos Diaz and design- 
er John C, Barreca, have joined Ran- 
dall Bees Architects Inc. (RBA), an- 
nounced Randall P. Bees, AIA, Presi- 
dentof the full-service industrial and 
commercial architectural firm, head- 
quartered in Libertyville. 

Diaz, 28, was formerly a project 
architect with Lincolnshire-based 
Dobrin and Associates Ltd., where he 
worked on the design team for pro- 
jects including four packing facilities 
for Federal Express totaling 240,000 
square feet in Schaumburg and 
Waukegan and Romulus, MI, just 
west of Detroit; an office/warehouse 
addition in Vernon Hills for Drum- 
mond American Corporation, a divi- 
sion of Lawson Products Inc. 

Barreca, 30, was bom in Wilmette 
and attended the Art Institute of 
Chicago. Prior to joining RBA, he was 
a designer for Dobrin and Kenosha- 
based Partners in Design Architects 
and a computer design consultant for 
AT&T. 

Randall Bees Architects Inc., was 
founded in July of 1998, by Randall P. 
Bees, AIA, 42. 




Carlos Diaz, architect, from left; Ann L Norman, vice president; 
John Barreca, designer and Randall Bees, president, center, have 
joined forces at Randall Bees Architects Inc. — Submitted photo 



ON THE MOVE 



Joseph M. Modica, C.P.A. has 
joined the staff of Dam, Snell and 
Taveirne, LTD., a full service ac- 
counting firm with locations in Fox 
Lake, Crystal Lake and Libertyville, 
announced Douglas J. Taveirne, 
partner. Modica brings over a decade 
of valuable experience from many 
facets of the accounting business. In 
addition to general accounting ex- 
pertise, he has experience in devel- 
opment and acquisitions, MIS, per- 
sonnel, telecommunications, design 
and implementation of office-wide 



software systems and international 
accounting. Modica, a C.PA, earned 
a Bachelor of Science from Illinois 
State University with a major in fi- 
nance and minors in accounting, 
business administration and com- 
munications. 

Ed Siegel, Pam Hlderiotis, D ren - 
da Bersanl and Loise Cerbus, Real- 
tors with Century 21 Kreuser and 
Setter in Libertyville, have earned the 
"AtHome With Diversity: One Amer- 
ica" certification after successfully 



completing a course developed by 
the National Association of Realtors 
(NAR) in cooperation with the U.S. 
Department of Housing and Urban 
Development (HUD). The course is 
designed to equip real estate profes- 
sionals with the tools to expand 
homeownership opportunities for 
the growing number of multicultural 
and minority buyers entering the 
housing market and to encourage 
more people of diverse ethnic back- 
grounds to become real estate practi- 
tioners. 



$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$ $ $ $ $ $$$$$$$$$$$ 



FROM PAGE C6 



CDW 



Learn How 
The Internet 
Can Increase 
Your Revenue. 



February 10 
7 P«M* 

Speaker: Steven Wadhwa 

NBA, 20 Yrs. Business 
Consulting Experience 



The Office Center Of Gtirnee 

Spruce Park 

5465 W. Grand Ave. - Ste. 100 
For Information, Call (847) 855-6510 

Sponsored by: 
WKRS 



president. 

Zeman added, "The aggressive 
addition of account managers ini- 
tiated in 1998 continues to pay 
dividends as they expand and so- 
lidify relationships with cus- 
tomers. We will implement our 
growth strategy in 2000 by contin- 
uing to aggressively hire account 
managers and support them with 
marketing activities directed at in- 
creasing CDW's brand awareness 
and visibility. We plan to increase 
our sales force by approximately 
30 percent in 2000 and to open our 
downtown Chicago sales office In 
the second quarter to accommo- 
date growth." 

Our web site continues to 
evolve as an integral part of our 
business model, and an extension 
of our account managers' relation- 
ships with customers. In the fourth 
quarter, direct Web sales of $53.8 
million grew 161 percent over the 
fourth quarter of 1998 and 19 per- 
cent over the third quarter of 1999. 
"Our customized customer web 
site program, CDW@work, is an 
excellent complement to our busi- 
ness model, providing our cus- 
tomers the information and tools 



they need to make their jobs easi- 
er," said Zeman. 

Gross profit margin was 12.9 
percent of net sales in the fourth 
quarter of 1999, versus 12.7 per- 
cent In the prior year quarter. 

"Our focus on providing multi- 
brand technology solutions in the 
business marketplace is working. 
Commercial sales increased 65 
percent and account for more than 
93 percent of total sales. Sales per 
active commercial account in- 
creased 40 percent in the fourth 
quarter of 1999 compared to the 
same period of 1998. We did not 
experience a slowdown in demand 
relating to Y2K issues, as our small 
to medium business ("SMB") cus- 
tomers purchase the mission criti- 
cal products necessary to support 
their day-to-day business heeds," 
said Michael P. Krasny, Chairman 
and Chief Executive Officer. 

CDW a FORTUNE 1000 com- 
pany, is a leading direct product 
provider, offering complete, cus- 
tomized computing solutions for 
businesses and consumers nation- 
wide. Founded in 1984 as a home- 
based business, CDW today em- 
ploys more than 2,000 coworkers. 



TAYLOR 



ItOOT 



INTERNET SOLUTIONS 



$ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ .$ $ $ $ $ 



fail fast? Surround yourself with 
people who know less than you do. 
Pay them poorly, give them mini- 
mal training and spend a lot of time 
away from your business. I'll guar- 
antee quick failure. To avoid this 
trap, look for good people before 
you need them, and train your folks 
continuously. 

The no-time-to-plan trap. Too 
busy to plan? Then you're too busy 
to see the trap you're about to step 
In. Growing, thriving companies 
take time to plan. It doesn't have to 



be long, but you'd better have a 
plan. There are three simple steps 
in good planning: 1) Find out where 
you are, 2) Decide where you want 
to go, and 3) Lay out short steps to 
get from one to two. 

Watch for these traps. The best 
way to solve problems is to antici- 
pate them. 

Don Taylor is the co-author of 
Up Against the Wal-Marts. You may 
write to him in care of Minding 
Your Own Business, PO Box 67, 
Amarillo, TX79105. 



C8 /Lakeland Newspapers 



HOME & GARDEN 



February 4, 2000 





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FALL HOME & GARDEN 



Lakeland Newspapers I CO 






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Tips on hiring household help 



Fast-paced lifestyles combined with no 
free time arid a dirty home create a recipe for 
maid service help. According to American De- 
mographics magazine, have hired more than 
10 million households will hire household 
help. That's 17 percent of American house- 
holds! 

But before you pick up that phone to 
schedule an appointment, it's important to 
know whom you are letting into your home. 
"Customers want a service they can trust," 
said Janet Nelson, spokesperson forThe 
Maids International. "Our franchise owners 
go to great lengths to gain and ensure the 
trust of their customers. The Maids' owners 
screen employees during the interview 
process; do thorough background checks; use 
a four-person supervised cleaning team, and 
keep customers' keys computer coded." 

The Maids provide the following tips for 
homeowners to follow before hiring a maid 
service: 

• Bonding: Make sure the company is 
bonded. Should a theft occur, you need to be 
protected. Some companies, if they are bond- 
ed at all, protect only themselves, not the con- 
sumer. 

• Insurance: Make sure the company is in- 
sured. If a maid slips and falls while cleaning 
the shower, your home owner's policy might 
not cover the incident 



• References; Make sure the company is 
reliable. Ask for references and a work history. 

■ Screening and hiring: Ask if employees' 
references are checked and if their residence 
status is confirmed. A professional company 
will screen each employee for honesty and 
dependability. 

• Cleaning products and equipment 
Some independent housekeepers as well as 
some services expect you to supply all clean- 
ing products and equipment Check out 
what's included with your house cleaning. 

- Guarantee: Make sure the service is . 
backed by a written satisfacdon guarantee. 

•Taxes: Make sure you don't break 
any tax laws. If you pay a housekeeper or 
maid at least $1,000 per year, the law re- 
quires you to pay social security and oth- 
er taxes on that person. Most maid ser- 
vice companies withhold taxes for their 
employees, but check to make sure. For 
more information about household em- 
ployee taxes, call the Internal Revenue 
Service at 1-800-829-1040. 

The Maids is one of the oldest and largest 
professional residential maid services in the 
nation. They were established in 1979 and 
serve more than 400 markets in the U.S. and 
Canada. For more information about their 
services, visit The Maids Web site at 
www.maids.com. 




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Each year, droves of con- 
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the most prestigious lifestyle 
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to discover the latest interior de- 
signs, home furnishings and 
building materials. 

These display homes are re- 
garded as the bellwethers of ar- 
chitectural trends, signaling pre- 
vailing consumer home de- 
mands. Although this year's in- 
spirational homes feature many 
unique aspects, they do have at 
least one trait in common: Many 
are clad in siding products from 
James Hardie Building Products. 
Examples of display homes that 
used lames Hardie siding this 
year, include the following: The 
architects and builders of the 
Better Homes and Gardens 
"Blueprint 2000" home for the 
new millennium in Chapel Hill, 
N.C.; Southern Living's Idea 
House near the Village of Pine- 
hurst, N.C.; Coastal Living's Idea 
House in Carillon Beach, Fla.; 
and Sunset's Idea House in Cu- 
pertino, Calif. 

"James Hardie siding prod- 
ucts allowed us to capture the 
essence of the character we were 
trying to achieve, yet they also 
offer a virtually maintenance- 
free base," said J. Carson Looney, 
FAIA, with Looney Ricks Kiss Ar- 
chitects in Memphis, Tenn., the 
firm that designed the Better 
Homes and Gardens show house. 

Due to its proprietary fiber- 
cement technology, Hardiplank 
siding from James Hardie Build- 
ing Products is the first lap sid- 
ing material that does not com- 
promise a home's character or 
necessitate heavy upkeep. It is 



guaranteed by a 50-year warran- 
ty not to rot, warp, buckle, swell 
ordelaminate, even if exposed to 
rain, hail, humidity or insects. 

"We have been using 
Hardiplank siding for several 
years because it won't warp, split 
or rot," says Jose Camina with 
Camina Design & Construction, 
the firm that built this year's 
Southern Living Idea House near 
the Village of Pinehurst, N.C. 
"With Hardiplank siding, I don't 
have to worry about 'callbacks' 
from homeowners because the 
product holds paint well, stays 
put and looks great." 

After proving itself for more 
than two decades, leading 
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fident in selecting Hardiplank 
siding to create today's desired 
home style. In fact, over the past 
10 years, more than one million 
homes have been built with 
Hardiplank siding in the United 
States. 

Due to the product's success, 
it has received numerous hon- 
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zine named the company's prod- 
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For more information, call 1- 
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C 1 / Lakeland Newspapers 



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IIANDY 

Jean Handy, age 68 of Antioch 
Arr; Salata Gurnee Funeral 
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HAIL 

Betty J. Hall, age 74 of Mundelein 

Arr: McMurrough Chapel, Libertyville . 

TERMINI-JOHNSON 

Virginia Termini-Johnson, age 90 of 

Wauconda 

Arr: Burnett-Dane Funeral Home, 

Libertyville 



KRINSKI 

Joseph J. Krinski, age 82 of Libertyville 
Arr: McMurrough Funeral Home, 
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philips 

Kenneth Wayne Phillips, age 66 of 

Lindenhurst 

Arr: Marsh Funeral Home of Lindenhurst 

WILSON 

Betty E. Wilson, (nee Whitehouse) age 68 of 

lngleslde 

Arr: Windridge Funeral Home, Cory 









■ ' 




Funeral Directory 



. 









CONNOR-MCVAY 
CREMATION & 
FUNERAL CARE 

Crossings Plaza 

300 N. Milwaukee Ave., 

Lake Villa, IL 

(847)265-4370 

Mike Connor & Steve McVay, 

Directors 

JUSTEN'S ROUND LAKE 
FUNERAL HOME 

222 N, Rosedale Court 
(Rosedale at Cedar Lake Road) 

(847) 546-3300 

Nancy Justen & Mark Justen, 

Directors 

Additional Locations in 

McHenry and Wonder Lake 

K.K. HAMSHER FUNERAL 
HOME, LTD. 

12 N. Pistakee Lake Rd. ( Fox 

Lake, IL 

(847)587-2100 

Kenneth K. Hamsher, Debra 

Hamsher Glen, Directors 



RINGA 
FUNERAL HOME 

122 S. Milwaukee Ave., Lake 

Villa, IL 

(847) 356-2146 

Robert J. Ringa, Jr. 

SPRING GROVE 
FUNERAL CHAPEL 

8103 Witmot Rd., RO. Box 65, 

Spring Grove, IL 60081 

(815) 675-0550 or Toll Free 

(888) 394-8744 

Kurk P Paleka, Director 

STRANG FUNERAL HOME 

1055 Main St., Antioch, IL 

(847) 395-4000 
Dan Dugenske, Director 

STRANG FUNERAL CHAPEL 
AND CREMATORIUM, LTD. 

410 E. Belvidere Grayslake, IL 

(847) 223-8122 

David G. Strang and Richard 

A Gaddis, Director 




Timothy W. 
Dillon 





February 4, 2000 



Timothy W. Dillon 

Age 56 of Ingleside, died ouesday, Jan. 25, 2000 at his 
home. He was bom Aug. 6, 1943 in Chicago to William E and 
~Genevievo D. (Kasules) Dillon. On June 26, 1971, he was unit- 
ed in marriage with Gail M. Branda at Our Lady of Hope 
Church in Rosemont. Mr. Dillon 
was a 50 year resident of Lake 
County, and lived for the past 30 
years in Ingleside. A 35 year 
employee of NCR, he was a field 
service engineer and worked out of 
the Mundelein office. Mr. Dillon 
was a member of St. Bede Church 
in Ingleside, and a member, of the 
St. Vincent dePaul Society at the 
Church, where he served as secre- 
tary. He was active for many years 
as a scoutmaster for both the Cub 
Scouts and Boy Scouts, participat- 
ing in many activities through the 
years. He had served as president of the Wooster Lake 
Improvement Association. Among his hobbies, he enjoyed 
astronomy, camping, and boating, and was known for his love 
of fixing things. 

Survivors include his loving wife of 28 years, Gail; two 
children, Jennifer Ewigof Round Lake Park, and Robert Dillon 
of Antioch; two grandchildren, Allison an Felicia Ewig of 
Round Lake Park; his father, William Dillon of Mundelein; and 
two brothers, Patrick Dillon of Mundelein and Paul (Carolyn) 
Dillon of Lake Villa He is preceded in death by his mother. 

Visitation of family and friends was at Justen's Round 
Lake Funeral Home, Round Lake. 

The Funeral Mass was celebrated at St. Bede Church, 
Ingleside with Rev. John Krebs officiating. 

Interment was at Ascension Cemetery, Libertyville. 
.Memorials to the St. Vincent dePaul Society or Sl Bede 
Church would be appreciated by the family. 

Cynthia II. Wendt 

Age 65 of Spring Grove passed away Thursday, Jan. 27, 
2000ather home. Shewas bom Aug. 9, 1934 in Highland Pork, 
the daughter of the late Glenn and Mary (Thompson) Harris. 
She had lived in Bannockbum and Libertyville, before mov- 
ing to Spring Grove in 1973. She was a member of the 
Community Church of Richmond in Richmond. Cynthia was 
a Physical Education teacher in Waukegan and Grayslake 
School Districts until 1902 and most recently had worked for 
Aero Products in Wauconda. 

Survivors include two daughters, Tammy (her fiancee' 
Harold Hill) Barrett of Alabama and Nancy (Jeff) Norris of 
Spring Grove; one son, Scott (Mary Pat ) Jones of Evanston; 
two brothers, Glenn (Shirley) Harris of Buffalo Grove and Fred 
(Barb)Harris of Deerfield. Shewas the grandmother of Kaleb, 
Luke, Zac, Shannon and Brana. 

Memorial Services were held at the Spring Grove Funeral 
Chapel widi the Rev. Jerry Walton of the Community Church 
of Richmond, officiating. 

Interment was private. 

Patricia E. Huffman 

Age 52 of Round Lake, died Wednesday, Jan. 26, 2000 at 
Condell Medical Center in Libertyville. She was bom July 19, 
1947 in Hartsville, SC to Emanuel and Annie (Outlaw) 
Eastcrwood. A resident of Round Lake since 1995, she had 
lived in Antioch for most of her life. She also resided in 
Alabama from 1986 to 1993. Patricia attended the Clearvicw 
Baptist Church in Round Lake. An avid bingo player, she also 
enjoyed playing cards. 

Survivors include a daughter, Tammy Dugan of Round 
Lake; two sons, Dale Calvert of Round Lake and James 
(Priscilla) Huffman of Fox Lake; 12 grandchildren, Nicholas, 
Ryan and Rachael Dugan, Amanda, David, and Rebecca 
Calvert, James, Sara, John, Hailey and Trevor Huffman and 
Joshua Marcomb; her mother, Annie Eastcrwood of 
Richmond; two sisters, Rhonda (Charles) Marcomb, 
Burlington, Wis. and Linda (James) Pendley of Richmond; 
and a brother, Larry (Rita) Easterwood of Chicago. She is pre- 
ceded in death by her father and her husband, Douglas 
Huffman in 1993. 

Funeral Services were held at the Justen's Round Lake 
Funeral Home, Round Lake. 

Interment was at Highland Memorial Park in Libertyville, 

Austen M. Mueller 

Age 4 years old of Ingleside, passed awayTuesday, Jan. 25, 
2000 at his home. He was bom Dec. 28, 1995 in Libertyville, 
die son of Todd and Shannon (Jones) Mueller. He was a mem- 
ber of St. Bede Church in Ingleside. 

Survivors include his parents Todd and Shannon; one 
sister, Savanah at home; his maternal grandmother, Joan 
Jones of Cocoa, Fla., maternal grandfather, Robert (Janet) 
Jones of Las Vegas, Ncv.; his paternal grandmother, Natalie 
Mueller of Lakemoor, paternal grandfather, Chuck (Debbie) 
Mueller of Fox Lake; his maternal great grandparents, 
Dorothy Rogers of Mt. Prospect and Sumner and Sally Nudel 
of Northbrook. Many aunts, uncles and one cousin, Krystal 
Kirkpatrick also survive him. He is preceded in death by his 
maternal great grandparents, Jack and Ursula 'Peg* Duffey 
and his paternal great grandparents, Herman and Mary 
Mueller. 

Funeral Services with Mass of Chrisdan Burial was held 
at St. Bedes Church, Ingleside. 

Friends called at the Spring Grove Funeral Chapel, Spring 
Grove. 

Interment was at Woodland Cemetery in McHenry. 

Those desiring may make contributions to a family 
memorial in Austen's memory, 

Louis C Zarat 

Age 70, a lifetime resident of Fox Lake, died Tuesday, Jan. 



25, 2000 atSt.fheresc Medical Center in Waukegan. He was 
born on May 17, 1929 in Chicago to Louis W, and Ann (Nee 
Lewandowski) Zarat, and was a veteran having served with 
the U.S. Army during the Korean War. He was employed widi 
the Chicago Park District as a Senior Electrical Engineer, retir- 
ing after 35 years. He had been a member of the VFW, the 
Musicians Union, and St Bede's CaUiolic Church in Ingleside. 

Survivors include, two sons, Robert (Maggie) Zarat of 
Boulder, Colo and Ronald (Theresa) Zarat of Romeoville; 
three daughters, Deborah Zarat of Orland Park, Dave (Frank) 
Malone of Tega Cay, SC, Patty (Rod) Key of Scottsdalc, Ariz.; 
eight grandchildren, Kelly Zcurcher, Sam and Jesse Zarat, 
Jacob, Amber and Benjamin Zarat, Ellen Easter and Tyler 
Malone; two great grandchildren, Casey and Matthew Easter; 
his former wife, Joan Zarat of Arizona; and by his dear friend, 
Vera Hernandez of Waukegan. He is preceded in death by his 
parents. 

Friends and family called at the K. K. Hamsher Funeral 
Home, Fox Lake (the Chapel on die Lake) . 

A CaUiolic Memorial Mass was celebrated at SL Bede 
Catholic Church, Ingleside. 

Interment was at Grant Cemetery in Ingleside. 

Patrick Joseph Yllliger 

Age 56, a resident of Ingleside for over 23 years, died 
Monday, Jan. 24, 2000 at Loyola University Hospital; in 
Maywood. He was bom in Chicago on Dec 10, 1943 to Emll 
and Margaret (nee Conway) Vllliger Sr. He was employed with 
Motorola for over 37 years, before his retirement in 1998. 
During his career with the company he worked out of the 
Chicago, Schaumburg, Arlington Heights, and McHenry 
areas. Mr. Vllliger was a member of St. Bede's Catholic Church 
in Ingleside. 

Survivors include; his wife, Dale (nee Drmolka) Vllliger of 
Ingleside; three daughters, Ann (Brad Miller) Vllliger of 
McHenry, Kimberty (and her fiance' Nick Beres) Vllliger of 
Round Lake, Kathryn Vllliger of Ingleside; one grandson, 
Bradley Miller; his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Emil (Margaret) 
Villigcr Sr. of Chicago; his brothers and sister, Emil (Sue) 
Vllliger Jr. of Medinah, Alan (Diane) Villigcr of Addison, Paul 
Villigcr of Park Ridge, Maureen (Michael) Scharf of McHenry. 
He is preceded in death by his brother, John Michael Villigcr.' 

Friends and family called at die K. K. Hamsher Funeral 
Home, Fox Lake (The Chapel on the Lake) 

A Funeral Mass was celebrated. 

Interment was private which followed the Mass. 

Debbie L Goodwin (nee Dobner) 

Age 47, passed awayTuesday, Jan. 25, 2000 at Condell 
Medical Center, Libertyville. She was a resident of Round Lake 
Park for the past 23 years and a lifelong resident of Lake 
County. Debbie was a member of the Women's Auxiliary of the 
Round Lake Area Men's Club. She enjoyed bowling and was 
considered Bob's "right hand man" for the Villas of Timber 
Creek In Round Lake Park, 

She leaves the love of her life, Bob; daughter, Becky 
(Drew) Arthcr-Frielink, of No. Aurora; father, Francis 'Butch' 
Dobner of Lake Zurich; sisters, Carol (Roy) Ruck of Henning, 
Minn., Diane (Chuck) Donat of Round Lake Beach, Barb 
Runions of Vernon Hills and Sharon Dobner of Waukegan; 
brothers, Jerry (Fran) Dobner of Indiana and Ted Dobner of 
Florida; and brother-in-laws, Frank Donat of Mundelein and 
Noel Berndt of Vernon Hills. Also surviving are her step-chil- 
dren and several nieces and nephews. She is preceded in, 
death by her mother, Mildred j. Dobner in 1983; sisters, 
Darlene Donat in 1987 and Sandy 
Bcmdt in 1989; brother, Donald 'Dobie' Dobner in 1992. 

Funeral Services were held at Strang Funeral Chapel and 
Crematorium, Ltd., Grayslake. 

Interment followed at the Willow Lawn Cemetery, 
Mundelein, 

In lieu of flowers, donations may be given to the 
American Diabetes Association, 30 N, Michigan Ave., 2015, 
Chicago, IL, 60602 

Peter C Springer 

Age 36 of Antioch, passed awayTuesday, Jan. 25, 2000 at 

Continued on next page 



Strang Funeral Chapel 
& Crematorium, Ltd 



j *', 



' \y\^ 




FAMILY OWNED & OPERATED 
ESTABLISHED 1898 

410 luist Bclvidcrc Rood 
Grayslake, IL 60030. 

(847) 223-8122 

David Gv -Strang • Richard A. Gaddis 
Directors 






! 





February 4, 200G 



w 



OBITUARIES/LEGAL NOTICES 



Lakeland Newspapers/ C 1 ' 1 



A 

Y> 

e 

5, 

at 



2 



Continued from previous page 

Northern Illinois Medical Center, 
McHenry. He was bom Feb. 21 1963 in 
Denver, Cola, the son of Charles and 
Judith (Grant) Springer. He moved to 
Antioch in 1980 and was a member of the 
Loyal Order of Moose Lodge 525. Pete 
worked as a software technician in the 
computer industry. 

Survivors include his wife, Theresa 
(nee Patsis); six children, Peter Springer 
Jr., Brittany Springer, Courtney Springer, 
Richard Faust, Rachel Faust and 
Rosemary Faust,; his mother, Judith 
(Fred) Clesen of Spring Grave; his mater- 
nal grandfather, Chester Grant of 
Chicago; two brothers, Stacey and Scott 
Springer, both of Spring Grove; two sis- 
ters, Jennifer pave) Beat tie of Trevor, 
Wis. and Charlaine (Phil) Wnuk of Lake 
Bluff; his mother-in-law, Joann Patsis; his 
brothers and sisters-in-law, Michael, 
Chris (Beth) and Kathy (Bill) Patsis and 
Rosanne (Dan) Taylor, nine nephews and 
four nieces. He is preceded in death by 
his father, Charles DeVineySpringer. 

Funeral Services with Mass of 
Christian Burial was held at St. Peter 
Church, Antioch. 

Friends and family called at the 
Strang Funeral Home of Antioch. 

Interment was at Hillside Cemetery, 
Antioch. 

Memorial donations to trie family 
would be appreciated. 

Martha Miibauer 

Age 94 of Antioch, passed away 
Sunday, Jan. 30, 2000 at the Sheridan 
Health Care, Zion, She was bom Feb. 1, 
I DOS in Leipzig, Germany, thedaughterof 
the late Heinrich and Marie (Brodc) 
Wernicke, coming to the U.S. in 1938. She 
lived in Trevor, Wis. for several years 
before moving to Antioch in 1902. 
Martha was a homemakcr and married 
Frank Miibauer on March 8, 1935 in New 
York. He preceded her in death on Feb. 9, 
1991 

Survivors include her dear friend, 
Linda (Sam) Cicero of Island Lake. 

Funeral Services and interment were 
private. 

Arrangements were entrusted to the 

Strang Funeral Home of Antioch. 

u ■.. ■ ■-■' ■ ■ ;i i' •< 

Dorothy Scharfnorth (nee 
Thompsen) 

Age 77, a resident of Fox Lake for the 
past Five years, died Sunday, Jan. 30, 2000 
in Ingleside. She was bom on March 27, 
1922 to August and Ethel (nee Halverson) 
Thompsen in Chicago, where she was 
united in marriage to William F. 'Buck' 
Scharfnorth Sr. on March 20, 1943. The 
couple moved to Round Lake in 1944. 
She had enjoyed collecting dolls, making 
dolls and was an accomplished seam- 
stress, who excelled intricate handwork. 
After moving to Lilac Apts. In Fox Lake, 
she joined their craft club and was on 
avid Bunco player. 

Survivors include, her son, William F. 
'Buck' (Cindy) Scharfnorth Jr. of 
Alpharetta, Ga.; her daughters, Carolyn 
'Cookie' (John L) Sullivan of Ingleside 
and Donna (Rolf) Viel of Round Lake; 
eight grandchildren and nine great 
grandchildren; her brother, George (Ann) 
Thompsen of Fox Lake; two sisters, Betty 
(Bob) Canning of Lincolnshire and Ethel 
(Bill) Diehl of Arlington Heights; her sis- 
ter-in-law, Charlotte Thompson of 
Chicago and numerous nieces and 
nephews. She is preceded in death by her 
parents, August and EthelThompsen, her 
husband, Wm. E 'Buck* Scharfnorth Sr. 
and one brother, LeRoy Thompson. 

Friends of the family may call from 
1*30 p.m., Saturday, Feb. 5 at the K. K. 
Hamsher Funeral Home, 12 N. Pistakec 
Lake Rd., Fox Lake (The Chapel on the 
Lake) where Memorial Services will be 
conducted at 2:30 p.m. widi die Rev. Greg 
Wiggins officiating. 

Memorials for the Susan G. Komen 
Breast Cancer Foundation, c/o 
Chicagoland Area chapter, P.O. Box 604, 
Naperville, IL 60566, will be appreciated 
by the family. 

Marcia M. Fiore (nee Berg) 

Age 76, passed away Saturday, Jan. 
29, 2000 at Condell Medical Center, 
Libertyville. She was a resident of 
Grayslake since 1953, formerly of 
Minnesota. Marcia attended St. Gilbert 
Church and was tire co-owner of Fiore's 
Pizza Pub on Rollins Road in Round Lake 
Beach. 

She leaves her husband, Jack whom 
she married on June 16, 1943 in Chicago; 
sons, Barry R. Fiore of Englcwood, Colo., 
and Jack C. (Jan) Fiore of Grayslake; 
brother, Charles (Wanda) Berg of Phelps, 



Wis,, and four grandchildren. She is pre- 
ceded in death by her parents, Sigmund 
and Es telle. 

Funeral Services were held at Strang 
Funeral Chapel and Crematorium, Ltd, 
Grayslake. 

Interment was privately held at Avon 
Centre Cemetery, 

In lieu of Dowers donations may be 
made to the American Lung Association, 
1440 W. Washington Blvd.. Chicago, IL 
60607-9949, 

J. Kevin Barry 

Age 60 of Spring Grove, passed away 
Friday, Jan. 28, 2000 at his home. He was 
bom Jan. 6, 1940in Pawtucket, RI, the son 
of the late James and Catherine 
(Callahan) Barry. He had lived in Rhode 
Island, Maine and Milwaukee, Wis. 
before moving to Spring Grove in 1977. 
He was a member of St Peter Church in 
Spring Grove. He was an avid fisherman 
and belonged toTrout Unlimited and the 
Federated Fly Fisherman's Association. 
He also enjoyed designing and building 
furniture. Kevin was a mechanical engi- 
neer for many years and also loved teach- 
ing. He had taught at Woodstock, 
Johnsburg and Richmond High Schools. 
On Oct. 11, 1975 he married Mary Lou 
Buckholz in Baraboo, Wis. 

Survivors include his wife, Mary Lou; 
two sons, Brian of Portland, Me. and 
Kevin Andrew parlene) of Waterville, 
Me.; one sister, Brenda Barry of Boston, 
Mass. One brother, David Barry preceded 
him in death. 

A Memorial Mass will be held at 1 1 
a.m. Saturday, Feb. 5, 2000 at St Peter 
Church, 21 18 Main St., Spring Grove, with 
the Rev. Andrew Plesa officiating. 

Interment will be private in Heber 
Springs, Ark. 

There will be no visitation. 

Arrangements were entrusted to 
Spring Grove Funeral Chapel, Spring 
Grove. 

Elmer D. Sheehan 

Age 84 of Lake Villa, passed away 
Thursday, Jan. 27, 2000 at Condell 
Medical Center, Libertyville. He was bom 
June 4, 1915 in Lake Villa Township, the 
son of the late Daniel and Blanche 
(Tidmarsh) Sheehan and has been a life- 
long resident. As a young man he was a 
dairy farmer and later a construction 
worker. He retired as a supervisor with 
Johnson Motors in Waukegan. Elmer 
served in the U.S. Navy from May 1943 
until Nov. 1945, as a Seabce with the 
105th Naval Construction Battalion dur- 
ing WWII and is a member of the VFW 
Post 4308 of Lake Villa. He was a founding 
member of Prince of Peace Church; a for- 
mer trustee of the Village of Lake Villa and 
a 50 year member and formerChief for 13 
years, of the Lake Villa Fire Department. 
On Oct. 19, 1937 he married Valeria Slazes 
in St. Peter Church in Antioch and she 
preceded him in death on March 14, 
1998. 

Survivors include his daughter, Joyce 
(Carl) Meyer of LaGrange; four grandchil- 
dren, Anna and Eric Meyer and Matthew 
(Julie) Sheehan and Sara Sheehan; one 
sister, Hazel Justice of Elbum; andlme 
daughter-in-law, Jane Sheehan of 
Madison, Wis. In addition to his wife, he 
is preceded in death by one son, Jim in 
1996; six brothers, Joseph, Warren, 
Howard, Charles, Robert and Frank and 
two sisters, Stella Stahmer and Arlinc 
Slazes. 

Funeral Services with Mass of 
Christian Burial were held at Prince of 
Peace Church, Lake Villa. 

Friends and family visited at the 
Strang Funeral Home of Antioch. 

Interment was at Ascension 
Cemetery, Libertyville. 

In lieu of flowers, those desiring may 
moke contributions to Prince of Peace 
Church or the Lake Villa Fire 
Department, in his memory. 

Amador C. Negrete 

Age 76 of Round Lake Park, died 
Saturday, Jan. 29, 2000, at St. Theresc 
Medical Center in Waukegan. He was 
bom Dec 30, 1924 in Redwood, Minn., to 
Preciliano and Andrea (Cruz) Negrete. On 
July 20, 1950, he married Frances Morales 
in Chicago. Formerly of Chicago, Mr. 
Negrete moved to Round Lake Park in 
1 969. For over 48 years, he was employed 
with the Grieve Corp. as a tester. He had 
also worked at Nabisco Co. in Chicago. 
Mr. Negrete was an active member of St. 
Joseph Catholic Church in Round Lake. 

Survivors Include his wife of 49 
years, Frances; four daughters, Linda 
(Scott) Clark of Trevor, Wis., Andrea 
(Artemio) Castro of Round Lake; Barbara 
(Salvador) Arreola of Round Lake, and 



Annette (Tom) McGinley of Round Lake; 
a daughter-in-law, Sheila Negrete of 
Cleveland, Miss,; 1 1 grandchildren; four 
great grandchildren; two sisters, Lupe 
Cruz of Mexico and Chuy (John) 
Koleczek of Tiriley Park; and a brother, 
Margarita Negrete of Mexico. He is pre- 
ceded In death by his parents; and two 
sons, Peter, in June 1967 and AnUiony on 
July 14, 1999. 

Visitation was at Justen's Round Lake 
Funeral Home, Round Lake. 

The Funeral Mass was celebrated at 
St. Joseph Catholic Church, Round Lake 
with the Rev. Raymond Skriba officiating. 

Interment was. at Ascension 
Cemetery, Libertyville. 

LeRoy E Cousineau 

Age 87 of Round Lake Beach, died 
Saturday, Jan. 29, 2000 at Condell Medical 
Center In Libertyville. He was born 
March 27, 1912 in Chicago to Paul and 
Amelia (Williams) Cousineau. Formerly 
of Chicago, Mr. Cousineau was a phar- 
macist for over 50 years. He was in part- 
nership with the Schaeffer Drug Store at 
Harrison and Cicero in Chicago. After 
moving to Round Lake area in 1992, he 
attended St Joseph Catholic Church in 
Round Lake. He served in the US. Army 
during World War II. 

Survivors include a niece, Faith 
(Allan) Balme of River Grove; a nephew, 
Gregory Hamilton of Melrose Park; and 
many great nieces and nephews. He is 
preceded in death by his parents and, a 
sister, Myrtle (the late Arnold) Hamilton. 

The Funeral Blessing took place at 
Justen's Round Lake Funeral Home, 
Round Lake with the Rev. Raymond 
Skriba of St. Joseph Catholic Church offi- 
ciating. 

Interment was at Queen of Heaven 
Cemetery, Hillside. " 

Susan L Hflleshiem . 

Age 52 of Paddock Lake, Wis., 
passed away, Saturday, Jan. 29, 2000 at 
Vencor Hospital, Milwaukee, Wis., after 
an extended illness. She was born April 
3, 1947 in Chicago, the daughter of 
Edward M. and Lillie B. (Evans) 
Hllleshiem moving to Paddock Lake, 
Wis. in 1952. She was a graduate of GTI 
in Kenosha, Wis. and the University of 
Wisconsin in Whitewater, Wis.„ She^ 
worked for the Bureau of Indian Affairs 
in New Mexico and Arizona as a special 
education teacher and later worked as 
the librarian at W.C. Petty Elementary 
School in Antioch, retiring due to ill 
health. Susan was a member of Zion 
Evangelical Lutheran Church of Bristol, 
Wis. 

Survivors include her mother, lillie 
widi whom she made her home; one 
brother, Robert of Paddock Lake, Wis, 
and one sister, Betty (Roger) Hallwas of 
Antioch; two nieces; two nephews and 
two great nephews. She is preceded in 
death by her father, Edward M. 
Hilleshiem. 

Funeral Services were held at Strang 
Funeral Home of Antioch with Pastor 
Jud A. Krohn officiating. 

Interment was at Liberty Cemetery, 
Salem Township, Wis. 

Grace V. Ansani (nee "Wilson) 

Age 90, a Fox Lake resident for the 
past 20 years, died on Jan. 24, 2000 at the 
Fountains Care Center in Crystal Lake. 
She was bom at Marinette, Wis. Mrs. 
Ansani was a former volunteer worker 
for die Fox Lake Community Center. A 
former member of the Illinois Retail 
Liquor Dealers Assoc and a longtime 
member of the Grant Township 
Republican Qub. 

Survivors include, one daughter, 
Arlene (Peter) Jakstas of Fox Lake; 10 
grandchildren, Peter Jakstas, Laura (Matt 
) Soucy, Karen (Mark) Jakstas, Erica 
Jakstas, Robert (Elena) Alsani, Michael 
(Lynn) Ansani, Jeff (Jayne) Ansani, David 
(Maricclla) Ansani, Grace and Mark 
Ansani; eight great grandchildren, Grace, 
Neal, Roberto, Steven, Daniel, Andrew, 
Bobby and Norma; her daughter-in-law, 
Catherine Ansani of Chicago; one broth- 
er, Woodrow (Betty) Wilson of Ohio; 
nieces and nephews and other relatives 
survive. Mrs. Ansani is preceded in deatii 
. by her husband, Robert J. Ansani; by one 
son, Robert C. Ansani; by three brothers, 
Edward, Jess and Joseph; and by five sis- 
ters, Alice, Edith, Molly, Dolly and 
Blanche. 

Funeral Services were held at the K. 
K Hamsher Funeral Home, Fox Lake 
(The Chapel on the Lake). 

Entombment was at Queen of 
Heaven Cemetery at Hillside. 

In lieu of flowers the family suggests 
memorials for your favorite charity. 



PUBLIC NOTICE 
STATE OF ILLINOIS) 
COUNTY OF LAKE ) 

INTHE CIRCUIT COURT FOR THE NINETEENTH 
JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, LAKE COUNTY, ILLINOIS 
INTHE MATTER OF THE PETITION ) 

OF JOSHUA RANDALL, JORDAN ALEXANDER. 

JONATHAN MATTHEW ROBERTS, } No.: 

FOR CHANGE OF NAME ) 

NOTICE OF PUBLICATION 
Public notice is hereby given on March 10, 2000, being one of the return days in 
the Circuit Court of the County of Lake, I will file my Petition in said Court praying (or 
the change of my name from JOSHUA RANDALL, JORDAN ALEXANDER, 
JONATHAN MATTHEW ROBERTS, to that of JOSHUA RANDALL. JORDAN 
ALEXANDER, JONATHAN MATTHEW HARRIS pursuant to the Statute in such case 
.made and Provided. - • - 

Dated at Lake Villa, Illinois, January 31 , 2000. 

(sJ Dawn Roberts - Hams 

0200A-3139-LV 

February 4, 2000 

February 1 1 , 2000 

February 18, 2000 



PUBLIC NOTICE 
CHANGE OF OWNER'S LEGAL NAME OR ADDRESS 
OR BUSINESS ADDRESS CHANGE OR ADDITION 
STATE OF ILLINOIS ) SS 

COUNTY OF MCHENRY ) 

INTHE CIRCUfT COURT FOR THE NINETEENTH 
JUCIDIAL CIRCUIT, MCHENRY COUNTY, ILLINOIS 
IN THE MATTER OFTHE PET[TtON OF GENERAL 

No. 

James Lawrence 
Davis Jr. 
FOR CHANGE OF NAME 

NOTICE OF PUBLICATION (ADULT) 
Public notice is hereby given that on March 28, 2000, 9 a.m. I will file and request a 
hearing on my Petition in trie Circuit Court of the Nineteenth Judicial Circuit, McHenry 
County, Illinois, praying for the change of my name from James Lawrence Davis, Jr. 
to that of James Lawrence Haliotis pursuant to the Illinois Compiled Statutes on 
Change of Names. 

Dated at McHenry, Illinois, January 21. 2000. 

1st James Lawrence Davis, Jr. 

Petitioner 

0100D-3121-FL 

January 28; 2000 

February 4, 2000 

' February 11.2000 



PUBLIC NOTICE 
INTHE CIRCUIT COURT OFTHE NINETEENTH 
JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, LAKE COUNTY, ILLINOIS 
IN THE MATTER OF THE PETITION ) 
OF MARY KELLER, ) No.: 

FOR CHANGE OF NAME ) 

PETITION FOR NAME CHANGE 
Public notice Is hereby given on March 13, 2000, being one of the return days in 
the Circuit Court of the County of Lake, I will file my Petition in said Court praying for 
the change of my name from MARY KELLER, to that of MARY MCCARTHY, pursuant 
to the Statute in such case made and Provided. 

Dated at Vernon Hills, Illinois, _^ __. 2000. 

.MARY KELLER 
PUBLIC NOTICE . 
INTHE CIRCUIT COURT OFTHE NINETEENTH 
. JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, LAKE COUNTY. ILLINOIS 
IN THE MATTER OF THE PETITION ) 
OF JENNIFER KELLER, ) No.: 

FOR CHANGE OF NAME ) 

PETITION FOR NAME CHANGE 
Public notice is hereby given on March 13, 2000. being one of the return days in 
the Circuit Court of the County of Lake, I will file my Petition in said Court praying for 
the change of my name from JENNIFER KELLER, 1o that of JENNIFER MCCARTHY, 
pursuant to the Statute in such case made and Provided. 

Dated at Vernon Hills, Illinois, . 2000. 



JENNIFER KELLER 



This Document was Prepared By: 

Robert Thomas 

Attorney for Petitioner 

1655 North Arlington Heights Road 

Suite 300 West 

Arlington Heights, Illinois 60004 

(847) 392-5893 

Attorney No.: 6189174 



0200A-3132-LB 

February 4, 2000 

February 11, 2000 

February 18, 2000 



PUBLIC NOTICE 

Sealed bids will be received by Board of Trustees of the Fremont Public Library 
District, hereinafter known as the Owner, for Ihe construction/provision of the 
•Fremont Public Library District Furnishings". The date tor completion of this project 
is August 22, 2000. 

Bids for 'All Work* will be received by the Owner in the Office of the Architect; 
Phillips Swager Associates; 40 Shuman Blvd.; Suite 175; Naperville, Illinois 60563 on 
Tuesday, February 29. 2000; at 1 1 a.m. prevailing time. 

Bids will be publicly opened, read aloud and recorded. 

Bids will be held good and may not be withdrawn for a period of 60 calendar days 
from dale of receipt. 

Commencement of the work on the project shall be subject to Ihe discretion ol the 
Board ol Trustees of the Fremont Public Library District. The Owner reserves the right 
lo waive any Inegularities and to accept any or reject all bids when in the opinion pf 
the Owner, such action will serve the best Interest of Ihe Owner. 

Bid3 on all work of this contract shall be subject to the provisions of the "Illinois 
Prevailing Wage Act* (Illinois Rev : sed Statutes, Chapter 48, Section 395S - 1-12). - 

Drawings and Specifications are on file tor reference at the foltowing locations: 

1. Office of Ihe Architect, Phittips Swager Associates Inc., 40 Shuman 
Boulevard, Suite 175, Naperville, Illinois 60563, 

2. F. W. Dodge Corporation, 1411 Opus Place, 1st Floor, Executive Towers 
West Two, Downers Grove, Illinois 60515. 

3. SCAN, INC., 2 Prudential Plaza, Suite 600. 180 N. Sletson, Chicago, IL 
60601. 

4. Northern Illinois Building Contractors Association. 1111 South Alpine 
Road, Rockford, Illinois 61108. 

5. Construction Market Data, 2400 East Devon. Suite 267. Des Plaines. 
Illinois 60018. 

6. Fremont Public Library. 470 North Lake Street; Mundelein, Illinois 60060- 
1884. 

7. Contractor's Exchange. 1 1 360 W.Theodore Trecker Way, West Allis, Wl 
63214. 

8. Builder's Exchange ol Milwaukee, 2600 N. Mayfair Road, Milwaukee, Wl 
53226. 

Drawing and Specifications for this project may be obtained from: 
B and H Industries 
30W250 Butterfield Road, Suite 304 
Warrenville, Illinois 60555-151 1 
Ph. (630) 393-0777 
Plan deposit (checks only, no cash) will be S50.00 lor each complete set of bidding 
documents, with a limit of.three (3) complete sets tor each bidder. Full amount of the 
deposit will be returned to bidders if the documents are returned in a usable condi- 
tion within thirty (30) days after tho opening of bids. 

Ms. Kelly Krieg-Sigman 

Director, Fremont Public Library 

0200A-3131-GEN 

February 4, 2000 




-rt 



■ ~ n 



C 1 2 / Lakeland Newspapers 



LEGAL NOTICES 



February 4, 2000 









> 






. PUBLIC NOTICE 
The Village of Round Lake Beach 
Police Pension Board Meetings will be 
held on the fourth Tuesday of JANU- 
ARY, APRIL, JULY, OCTOBER. 

At 7 p.m. In the conference room 
located at the Round Lake Beach 
Police Department, 916 W. Rollins 
Rd., Round Lake Beach, IL 60073. 

Special meetings will be held upon 
order of the President, and notice of 
special meetings will be posted at the 
Round Lake Beach Police Station, 
forty-eight (48) hours In advance. 

David E, Ostertag, President 

Round Lake Beach 

Police Pension Board 

91 6 W. Rollins Road 

Round Lake Beach, IL 60073 

0200A-3140-RL 

February 4, 2000 

PUBLIC NOTICE 
ANTIOCH ROAD DISTRICT 
Notice is hereby given that sealed 
proposals will be received at the office 
of the Antioch Township Clerk, at 99 
Route 173, Antioch, Illinois 60002 until 
2 p.m. on February 14, 2000 tor fur- 
nishing of the following equipment. 
TWO - 2 1/2 TON DUMP TRUCKS 

Proposals shall be made on forms 
furnished by the Highway Commis- 
sioner, and shall be addressed in a 
sealed envelope to: Mark Ring, 
Antioch Road District Highway 
Commissioner, 99 Route 173, 
Antioch, Illinois 60002 and shall be 
marked "Equipment Proposal-Letting 
of February 14, 2000 Antioch Road 
District". Further Information regarding 
the letting may be obtained by con- 
tacting the Highway Commission-er at 
(847) 395-2070. The Road District in 
accordance with the laws of the State 
of Illinois hereby notifies all bidders 
that it will affirmatively insure that the 
contract entered into pursuant to this 
advertisement will be awarded to the 
lowest responsible bidder without dis- 
crimination on the grounds of race, 
color or national origin. 

By order of Mark Ring 

Antioch Road District 

Highway Commissioner 

February 1,2000 

0200A-3130-AN 

February 4, 2000 



PUBLIC NOTICE 
ON TOWNSHIP BUDGET 
Notice is hereby given that a ten- 
tative Budget and Appropriation 
Ordinance for Antioch Township in the 
County ot Lake, State ol Illinois, tar the 
fiscal year beginning February 1 j 2000 
and ending January 31 , 2001 will be 
on lile and conveniently available to 
public inspection at the Antioch 
Township Of lice, 99 Route 173, 
Antioch, Illinois Irom and alter 8.30 
a.m. on February 7. 2000. 

Notice Is further given hereby that 
a public hearing on said budget and 
Appropriation Ordinance will be held 
at 7:40 o'clock p.m. on the 9lh day of 
March, 2000 at the Antioch Township 
Office, 99 Route 173, Antioch, Illinois 
in this Township and the linal action on 
the Ordinance will be taken at this 
hearing. 

/s/ Kathleen M. Smith 
Antioch Township Clerk 
January 25, 2000 
PUBLIC NOTICE ON 
ROAD DISTRICT BUDGET 
Notice is hereby given that a ten- 
tative Budget and Appropriation 
Ordinance for the Antioch Road 
District, in the County of Lake, Slate of 
Illinois, for the fiscal year beginning 
February 1, 2000 and ending January 
31, 2001 will be on file and conve- 
niently available to the public for 
inspection at the Antioch Township 
Office, 99 Route 173, Antioch, Illinois 
60002 on the 7 day of February 2000, 
Notice Is lurther given hereby that 
a public hearing on said budget and 
Appropriation Ordinance will be held 
at 7:30 o'clock p.m. the 9th day of 
March, 2000 at the Antioch Township 
Office in the Antioch Township Road 
District and the final hearing and 
action on this ordinance will be taken 
at this hearing. 

is! Kathleen M. Smith 

Anlioch Township Clerk 

January 25. 2000 

0100D-3129-AN 

February 4, 2000 



PUBLIC NOTICE 

The Village of Fox Lake: Notice Is 
hereby given that sealed proposals 
will be received at the Fox Lake Village 
Hall, at 301 S. Rt. 59 Fox Lake, IL 
60020. For the purchase of the lollow- 
ing equipment: 1 Diesel Engine Driven 
200kW Electric Generator. 

Bids will be opened on February 
29, 2000 at 10 a.m., In the Council 
Chambers of the Village of Fox Lake, 
301 South Route 59, Fox Lake, IL 
60020. 

PUBLIC NOTICE 

The Village of Fox Lake: Notice is 
hereby given that sealed proposals 
will be received at the Fox Lake Village 
Hall, at 301 S, Rt. 59 Fox Lake, IL 
60020 until 10 a.m., on February 29, 
2000. For the purchase of the follow- 
ing equipment: 1 Diesel Engine Driven 
300kW Electric Generator. 

Bids will be opened on February 
29, 2000 at 10 a.m., In the Council 
Chambers of the Village of Fox Lake, 
301 South Route 59, Fox Lake, IL 
60020. 

0200A-3134-FL 
February 4, 2000 



PUBLIC NOTICE 
SMALL CLAIMS CASE 
NUMBER 99SC6498 
ERIN L MCCORMICK 
26832 N. GENESEE 
WAUCONDA. IL 60084 

You are being sued by AMERI- 
CAN STANDARD INSURANCE COM- 
PANY and AMIR ARMANIOUS in the 
Small Claims Court of RACINE 
County, 730 Wisconsin Ave, Racine, 
Wl 53403. A hearing will be held at 
1 :45 p.m. on February 29, 2000. If you 
do not appear, a judgment may be 
given to the person suing you. (A copy 
of this claim has been mailed to you at 
the address above). 
Dated this 24th day of January, 2000 
fs! Dorothy Case 
Attorneys for Plaintiff 
Heucr&.Case, S.C. 
John M. Heuer 
(State Bar 301015620) 
Dorothy Ann Case 
(State Bar #01014013) 
Kathryn S. Barker 
(Stale Bar #01000781) 
Gerald L Crouse, Jr. 
(State Bar #01000315) 
231 W. Wisconsin Avenue, 
Suite 1010 
Milwaukee, Wl 53203 
Phone: (414) 224-3500 
0200A-3133-WL 
February 4, 2000 



PUBLIC NOTICE 

ASSUMED BUSINESS 

NAME APPLICATION 

NAME OF BUSINESS: D & W 

Automotive 

NATURE/PURPOSE: Automotive 
Repair 

ADDRESS(ES) WHERE BUSINESS 
IS TO BE CONDUCTED OR TRANS- 
ACTED IN THIS COUNTY: 284 Main 
Street, Antioch, IL 60002. (847) 838- 
1395. 

NAME(S) AND POST OFFICE OR 
RESIDENCE ADDRESS(ES) OF THE 
PERSON(S) OWNING, CONDUCT- 
ING OR TRANSACTING BUSINESS: 
Wendy Hushmire, 4408 N. Oak Park 
Ave, Harwood Heights, IL 60706. 
(708) 867-5447. 
STATE OF ILLINOIS) 
COUNTY OF LAKE ) 

This is to certify that the undersigned 
intend(s) to conduct the above named 
business from the location(s) indicat- 
ed and that the true or real full 
name(s) of the person(s) owning, con- 
ducting or transacting the business 
is/are correct as shown, 
/s/ Wendy Hushmire 
January 20, 2000. 

The foregoing instrument was 
acknowledged before me by the per- 
son^) intending to conduct the busi- 
ness this 20th day of January, 2000. 
OFFICIAL SEAL 
/s/ Dana Krapf 
Notary Public 
Received: January 20. 2000 
Willard R. Helander 
Lake County Clerk 
0100D-3120-AN 
January 28, 2000 
February 4, 2000 
February 11,2000 



PUBLIC NOTICE 

Notice is hereby given thai THE VILLAGE OF FOX LAKE, Fox Lake, Illinois, will 
receive sealed proposals until: 

Thursday. February 10. 2000 at 10:00 A.M. in the Council Chambers, Village ol 
Fox Lake at which time bids will be opened tor the following: 

Proposed .500 MG Elevated Water Spheroid 
Plans, specilications and proposal forms may be obtained from Morris 
Engineering, Inc., 47 Nippersink Blvd., Fox Lake, Illinois 60020, and the Village of Fox 
Lake Village Hall, 301 South Route 59, Fox Lake, Illinois 60020 upon a non-refund- 
able deposit of $75,00. All bids must be accompanied by bid security equal to 5% ol 
the amount ol the bid, in the form ol a certified check, cashiers check or a bid bond 
written by a company properly licensed in Illinois. 

The successful bidder shall be required to furnish a contract bond written by a 
company licensed in Illinois. The bond will be in the amount equal to 110% of the con- 
tract amount. 

Each bid must be received In a sealed envelope, which Is marked In the lower left- 
hand corner EXACTLY as follows: 
BID: Village of Fox Lake 

Proposed .500 MG Elevated Water Spheroid 
No bid may be withdrawn for a period of sixty (60) days. 
The lowest and best proposal received will be accepted, but Ihe OWNER reserves 
the right to reject any or all proposals received and to waive informalities. 

0100D-3127-GEN 
January 28, 2000 
February 4, 2000 



PUBLIC NOTICE ON 
AVON TOWNSHIP BUDGET 
Notice Is hereby given that a 
Tentative amended Budget & 
Appropriation Ordinance for Avon 
Township In the County of Lake, State 
of Illinois, for the fiscal year beginning 
March 1, 2000 and ending February 
28, 2001 is on file and conveniently 
available to public inspection at Avon 
Township Center, 433 E. Washington, 
Round Lake Park, Illinois between the 
hours of 9 a.m. and 4 p.m. Monday 
through Friday. 

Further notice is hereby given that 
the final public hearing and action on 
this ordinance will be taken at a meet- 
ing to be held at Avon Township 
Center at 3 p.m. Monday, March 13, 
2000. 

Kathleen M. Lennon 

Avon Township Clerk 

0200A-3137-GURL 

February 4, 2000 



PUBLIC NOTICE 
ASSUMED BUSINESS 
NAME APPLICATION 

NAME OF BUSINESS; Schratwleser 
Consulting 

NATURE/PURPOSE: Administrative 
and Computer Consulting 
ADDRESS(ES) WHERE BUSINESS 
IS TO BE CONDUCTED OR TRANS- 
ACTED IN THIS COUNTY: 1318 N. 
Poplar, Round Lake Beach, IL 60073 
(847)740-8091. 

NAME(S) AND POST OFFICE OR 
RESIDENCE ADDRESS(ES) OF THE 
PERSON(S) OWNING, CONDUCT- 
ING OR TRANSACTING BUSINESS: 
Klmberly A. Schratwleser. 1318 N. 
Poplar, Round Lake Beach, IL 60073 
(847)740-8091. 
STATE OF ILLINOIS) 
COUNTY OF LAKE ) 

This Is to certify that the undersigned 
Intend(s) to conduct the above named 
business from the tocation(s) Indicat- 
ed and that Ihe true or real full 
name(s) of the person(s) owning, con- 
ducting or transacting the business 
is/are correct as shown. 
Is! Kimberly A. Schratwleser 
January 7, 2000. 

The foregoing instrument was 
acknowledged before me by the per* 
son(s) intending to conduct the busi- 
ness this 7th day ol January, 2000. 

OFFICIAL SEAL 

fs! Veronica L. Michelau 

Nolary Public 

Received: January 13, 2000 

Willard R. Helander 

Lake County Clerk 

0100C-3116-RL 

January 21 , 2000 

January 28, 2000 

February 4, 2000 



PUBLIC NOTICE 

ASSUMED BUSINESS 

NAME APPLICATION 

NAME OF BUSINESS: Millennium 

Muses 

NATURE/PURPOSE: Investment Club 
(purpose see mission statement) 
ADDRESS(ES) WHERE BUSINESS 
IS TO BE CONDUCTED OR TRANS- 
ACTED IN THIS COUNTY: 1508 
Vineyard Drive, Gurnee, IL 60031. 
(847) 223-3368. 

NAME(S) AND POST OFFICE OR 
RESIDENCE ADDRESS(ES) OF THE 
PERSON(S) OWNING, CONDUCT- 
ING OR TRANSACTING BUSINESS: 
Jill M. Dolan, 1508 Vineyard Drive, 
Gurnee, IL 60031 (847) 223-3368; 
Sally Evans, 416 N. Kennlcott, 
Arlington Hts.. IL 60005; Ginger 
Fruhwirlh, 17438 W. Walnut Lane, 
Gurnee, IL 60031; E. Lynn Lanoue, 
1660 Thacker, Des Plaines, IL 6001; 
Elisa A. Bartashevich, 4548 Covenant 
Court, Gurnee, IL 60031; Denise L.- 
Williams, 14105 Oak Knoll Road, 
Wadsworth, IL 60083; Edward G. 
Oilschlager, 14105 Oak Knoll Road, 
Wadsworth, IL 60083, Diane L. 
Fasano, 6779 E. Mt. Vernon Ct., 
Gurnee, IL 60031. 
STATE OF ILLINOIS) 
COUNTY OF LAKE ) 

This is to certify that the undersigned 
intend(s) to conduct the above named 
business from the location(s) indicat- 
ed and that the true or real lull 
name(s) of the person(s) owning, con- 
ducting or transacting the business 
is/are correct as shown, 
/s/ Jill M. Dolan, January 12, 2000. 
/s/ Sally Evans, January 12, 2000. 
!$! Ginger Fruhwirth 
January 12, 2000. 

/s/ E. Lynn Lanoue, January 12, 2000. 
Is! Elisa A. Bartashevich 
January 12, 2000. 
/s/ Denise L. Williams 
January 12, 2000, 
/s/ Edward G. Oilschlager 
January 12,2000. 
/s/ Diane L. Fasano 
January 12, 2000. 

The foregoing instrument was 
acknowledged before me by the per- 
son(s) Intending to conduct the busi- 
ness this 12th day ol January, 2000. 
OFFICIAL SEAL 
/s/ Kalherine E. Sumners 
Notary Public 
Received: January 13, 2000 
Willard R. Helander 
Lake County Clerk 
0100C-3115-GP 
January 21, 2000 
January 28, 2000 
February 4, 2000 



I PUBLIC NOTICE 

Fox Lake Mini StoragB will sell 
goods for non payment from; 
Unit 30 belonging to Chip Jidas con- 
sisting of household goods 
Unit 48 belonging to Norma Jollotta 
consisting ot household goods 

The sale will take place at Fox 
Lake Mini Storage, 31 South Arlington 
Lane, Fox Lake, Illinois 60020 on Feb. 
19, 2000 alio a.m. 

0200A-3135-FL 

February 4, 2000 

February 1 1 , 2000 



PUBLIC NOTICE 

ASSUMED BUSINESS 

NAME APPLICATION 

NAME OF BUSINESS: Michael 

Lescher, D/B/A "Your Link To The 

Chain" 

NATURE/PURPOSE: Realtor 
ADDRESS(ES) WHERE BUSINESS 
IS TO BE CONDUCTED OR TRANS- 
ACTED IN THIS COUNTY: 532 W. 
Lake St., Antioch, IL 60002. (847) 395- 
3000 Ex. 133. 

NAME(S) AND POST OFFICE OR 
RESIDENCE ADDRESS(ES) OF THE 
PERSON(S) OWNING, CONDUCT- 
ING OR TRANSACTING BUSINESS: 
Michael Wm. Lescher, 532 W. Lake 
St., Antioch, IL 60002. (847) 395-3000 
Ex. 133. 

STATE OF ILLINOIS) 
COUNTY OF LAKE ) 

This is to certify that the undersigned 
Intend(s) to conduct the above named 
business from the location(s) Indicat- 
ed and that Ihe true or real full 
name(s) of Ihe person(s) owning, con- 
ducting or transacting the business 
Is/are correct as shown, 
/s/ Michael Wm. Lescher 
January 18, 2000. 

The foregoing Instrument was 
acknowledged before me by the per- 
son^) Intending to conduct the busi- 
ness this 18th day of January, 2000. 
OFFICIAL SEAL 
/s/ Kimberly A. Aredia 
Notary Public 
Received: January 20, 2000 
Willard R. Helander 
Lake County Clerk 
0100D-3124-AN 
January 28, 2000 
February 4, 2000 
February 11.2000 



PUBLIC NOTICE 

ASSUMED BUSINESS 

NAME APPLICATION 

NAME OF BUSINESS: Ultimate Shine 

Cleaning Service 

NATURE/PURPOSE: House Cleaning 
Service 

ADDRESS(ES) WHERE BUSINESS 
IS TO BE CONDUCTED OR TRANS- 
ACTED IN THIS COUNTY: 77 Mariner 
Lane, Fox Lake, IL 60020 (847) 587- 
4169. 

NAME(S) AND POST OFFICE OR 
RESIDENCE ADDRESS(ES) OF THE 
PERSON(S) OWNING, CONDUCT- 
ING OR TRANSACTING BUSINESS: 
Karyn Prasil. 77 Mariner Lane, Fox 
Lake, IL 60020 (847) 587-1356. 
STATE OF ILLINOIS) 
COUNTY OF LAKE ) 

This is to certify that Ihe undersigned 
intend(s) to conduct (he above named 
business Irom the location(s) indicat- 
ed and that the true or real full 
name(s) ol the person(s) owning, con- 
ducting or transacting the business 
is/are correct as shown. 
Is! Karyn Prasil 
January 7, 2000 

The foregoing Instrument was 
acknowledged before me by the per- 
son(s) intending to conduct the busi- 
ness this 7th day of January, 2000. 

OFFICIAL SEAL 

Is! Maureen K. Stolarik 

Nolary Public 

Received: January 1 1 , 2000 

Willard R. Helander 

Lake County Clerk 

0100C-3118-FL 

January 21.2000 

January 26, 2000 

February 4, 2000 



PUBLIC NOTICE 
Fox Lake Fire Protection District 
meeting to be held at Fire Station #3. 
Molldor Road, Inglesido, IL, 7 p.m., 
February 9lh, 2000. 
Respectfully submitted 
Charles Tronvlg 

Secretary/Trustee * 

0200A-3136-FL 
February 4. 2000 



PUBLIC NOTICE 

ASSUMED BUSINESS 

NAME APPLICATION 

NAME OF BUSINESS: The Newborn 

Network 

NATURE/PURPOSE: Electronic Birth 
Announcements 

ADDRESS(ES) WHERE BUSINESS 
IS TO BE CONDUCTED OR TRANS- 
ACTED IN THIS COUNTY: 1193 
Pope's Creek Circle, Grayslake, IL 
60030. (847) 548-6537. 
NAME(S) AND POST OFFICE OR 
RESIDENCE ADDRESS(ES) OF THE 
PERSON(S) OWNING, CONDUCT- 
ING OR TRANSACTING BUSINESS: 
Christopher W. Urban, 1193 Pope's 
Creek Circle, Grayslake, IL 60030. 
(B47) 548-6537. 
STATE OF ILLINOIS) 
COUNTY OF LAKE ) 

This is to certify that the undersigned 
intend(s) to conduct the above named 
business from (he location(s) indicat- 
ed and (hat Ihe true or real full 
name(s) of Ihe person(s) owning, con- 
ducting or transacting the business 
Is/are correct as shown. 
Is! Christopher W. Urban 
January 21,2000. 

The foregoing Instrument was 
acknowledged before me by the per- 
sons) intending to conduct the busi- 
ness this 21st day ol January, 2000. 
OFFICIAL SEAL 
/s/ Dana Krapf 
Notary Public 
Received: January 21, 2000 
Willard R. Helander 
Lake County Clerk 
0100D-3123-GL 
January 28, 2000 
February 4, 2000 
February 11, 2000 



PUBLIC NOTICE 

ASSUMED BUSINESS 

NAME APPLICATION 

NAME OF BUSINESS: Thomas. G. 

Miller, Architects 

NATURE/PURPOSE: Architectural 
Design 

ADDRESS(ES) WHERE BUSINESS 
IS TO BE CONDUCTED OR TRANS- 
ACTED IN THIS COUNTY: 21621 
Wilmar Avenue, Grayslake, IL 60030- 
1033,(847)223-5443. 
NAME(S) AND POST OFFICE OR 
RESIDENCE ADDRESS(ES) OFTHE 
PERSON(S) OWNING. CONDUCT- 
ING OR TRANSACTING BUSINESS: 
Thomas G. Miller, 21621 Wilmar 
Avenue, Grayslake, IL 60030-1033. 
(847) 223-5443. 
STATE OF ILLINOIS) 
COUNTY OF LAKE ) 

This is to certify that the undersigned 
intend(s) to conduct the above named 
business from the location(s) indicat- 
ed and that the true or real full 
name(s) of the person(s) owning, con- 
ducting or transacting the business 
is/are correct as shown. 
/s/ Thomas G. Miller 
January 22, 2000. 

The foregoing instrument was 
acknowledged before me by Ihe per- 
son(s) intending to conduct the busi- 
ness this 22nd day ot January, 2000. 
OFFICIAL SEAL 
Is! Jane E. Hall 
Notary Public 
Received: January 24, 2000 
Willard R. Helander 
Lake County Clerk 
0100D-3125-GL 
January 28, 2000 
February 4, 2000 
February 11,2000 



PUBLIC NOTICE 

STATE OF ILLINOIS 

DEPARTMENT OF NATURAL RESOURCES 

NOTICE OF 5-YEAR LEASE OPPORTUNITY 

FOR OPERATION OF A CONCESSION FACILITY 

CHAIN O'LAKES STATE PARK 

LAKE & MCHENRY COUNTIES, ILLINOIS 

Sealed bids are requested by the Slate of Illinois, Department of Natural 

Resources, for the operation of a concession under a five-year lease providing lor 

boat rental, the sale of lood, drinks, fishing, camping, picnic supplies, hunting and 

fishing licenses, and winter sports. 

Complete information, including a Prospectus and Bid Forms tor the concession, 
may be obtained from the office ol the Site Superintendent, Chain O'Lakes State 
Park, 8916 Wilmot Road, Spring Grove, IL 60081, in the Counties ol Lake and 
McHenry, State of Illinois, or by contacting the Concession and Lease Olflce at (217) 
782-0179, 

A mandatory prebld meeting will be held at 9 a.m. on February 9, 2000 at the office 
of the Site Superintendent at Chain O'Lakes Slate Park. 

Bids will be received at the Department of Natural Resources, Division of 
Concession & Lease Management, 524 South Second Street, Room 610. Springfield, 
Illinois 62701-1787 until 2 p.m. on March 1, 2000, at which time all bids will be pub- 
licly opened and road. 

The State ol Illinois, Department of Natural Resources, reserves the right to reject 
any and all bids. 

The Department of Natural Resources shall not unlawfully discriminate on the 
basis ol race, color, sex, national origin, age, or handicap in admission to, or treat- 
ment or employment In programs or activities. 

Tracey Blackburn 
Concession & Lease Management 
0100C-3112-FL 
January 21 ,2000 
January 28, 2000 
February 4, 2000 



..:.- 



■ 



February 4, 2000 



CLASSIFIED 




Lakeland Newspapers / C 1 3 



IS 

ir- 

si- 
). 

M_ 
all 

ilic 
00 
Jer 
ark 

GL 
iOO 
KX) 

)00 



ice 

of 
ild. 
lib-; 

ect 

the 
aal- 

>urn 
ien( 
J-FL 
000 
000 
!000 




lassified (*&fuicl 




Personal;; 1 25 

Auctions . 1 30 

Business Personals -. -I35 

FiTuinciul . . ; , 1 40 






uttpioymetit 



Help Wanted Part-Tune 2I9 

Help Wuuied Full-'nnic ,220 

Employment Agencies 22 1 

Business Opportunities ." 225 

.Situations Wanted . . . .'. .228 

Child Cure ';'■•."•.•"'.. 240 

SelUHil/liistnlclion 250 



sVJLatkcl Cb*u\i\c 



'Antiques . .301 

Appliances 304 

Barter/Trade 308 

Bazaars/Crafts 310 

Building Materials . 314 

Business/Omce Equipment .318 

Rlecironics/Coinpuiers * .320 

Farm Guide 324 

Firewood 328 

Ganige/Ru it image Sales 330 

Ciotnl Things -To Eat 334 

Horses & Tack .338 

Household, Goods/Furniture 340 

Jewelry , . . .344 

Uwn/Gardcu 348 

C'lolhing 349 

Miscellaneous .350 

Medical Equip/Supplies 354 

Musical Instruments 358 

I'ets & .Supplies 360 

Restaurant Equipment 364 

Tools A Machinery 368 

Wanted To Buy ._, .370 

Homes For Sale .500 

Homes For Kent 504 

Homes Wanted SOB 

Homes Builders 510 

Condo/Tiiwn Homes < 514 

Mobile Homes 518 

Aparimeiils For Rent 520 

Apartments Wanted 524 

Api/Homes To Share 528 

Booms For Rent 530 

Buildings 533 

Business Property Kir Sale 534 

Business Properly For Rein -538 

; Investment Properly . ,. 540 

Mm i^.il'l- Services 544 

Farms 548 

Vacant Ij>ls/Acreage .560 

Rcsoris) Vacation Rentals ' 564 

(Jul Ol Area Properly 568 

Cemetery Lois • 57 ° 

Real Estate Wanted .574 



.578 



Real Estate Misc. . 



lSS*t 




rcreatlanal 

Recreational Vehicles 704 

Snowmohilcs/ATVs . -708 

Boats/Motors/Eic 710 

Camping 714 

Travel/Vacation . > 718 

Spoils Equipment .720 

Airplanes .j_. . 

L^t rit apart tilloti 

Cats lot Sale . .'. • .804 

Rental/Leases ■ • 8< » 8 

Classic/Antique Cars 810 

Services & Paris 814 

Car [.omis/hisuraiiee . .818 

Vans «24 

Four Wheel Drive/Jeeps -828 

Trucks/Trailers 834 

Heavy Equipment • 838 

Motorcycles • "• -H44 

Warned To Buy 848 

29*ri'/cr «WJrcr toru 

S03 

7 S06 

SOU 

SI2 

SI5 

SI8 

S21 



Appliances Repair 
Blacktop ...... 

Builders 

Carpentry ..... 
Carpel Cleaning 
Coiicrete/Cemeni 



Dry Wall 

Education/Instruction • ■ • -S24 

Electrical S27 

Fhcwood • • -*30 

Handyman S33 

I leaiing/Air Conditioning *>36 

Housekeeping • '*>3 ( > 

Landscaping > *>■*- 

Uiuttdry/Cleaniug • ■ ■ -*>45 

S48 

S5I 

S54 

S57 

S60 

K63 

S66 



Eegal Services , 

Medical Services ........ 

Moving/Storage 

Painting Decorating . . . . 
Paralegal/Typing Services 

Plumbing 

vis 



Pools r. 

Pressure Washing - Sft9 

Professional Services J>72 

Rttdio/TV Repair • S75 

Remodeling ^ 78 

Resumes **° ' 

Rixiling/Sidillg 



Stonige 
Tax Ser 



Trees/Plants 



Wedding 
Miscellaneous 



.S87 
.S'JO 
-S93 
,S06 
.S'J9 



£> 



istriiution 



Kenosha 
County 




Kenosha 



John* burg 



McHenry 



Cryttal 
Laka 

McFIcnry 
County 



*£-— - .Pound Uka Grayslaka 



lalandLako 



Wauconda 



North 
Barrlnoton Laka Zurich 

KUdcer 



Barrlngton 



Palatine 
Cook County 



Mundeleln 



Long 
Grove 



Deerfield 



Buffalo Grove 



Northbrook 



Lakeland Newspapers' Classifieds Appear in 11 Newspapers! 

Antioch News • Roimd Lake News • Lake Villa Record 

Mnndclein News • Wadsworth News • Grayslake Times 

Fox Lake Press • Gumce Press • Lindcnhurst News 

VVaitcorida Leader • Llbcrtyville News 




HOW TO PLACE A 
CLASSIFIED AD 



BY CALL 

PHONE (847)223-8161 

d Y Lakeland Newspapers 
P.O. Box 268 
MAIL Grayslake, IL 60030 



-IN • 30 S.Whitney St. 
PERSON Grayslake 

BY 
FAX (847)223-2691 





DEADLINES 

Direct Line Tues. 5pm 

Classified 

Business & Private Party... Wed. I Oam 
HOURS 

8am-8pm .........Mon.-Thurs. 

8am-5pm Friday 




aiiirie 





Lakeland 



rs 



110 


Notices 



115 



Lost & Found 



125 


Personals 



ERRORS: 

We strive to eliminate 

errors, but if one should 

occur, please report it 

immediately as we can be 

responsible for the first two 

"' (2) weeks only. 

NO ADJUSTMENTS CAN 

BE MADE UNLESS THEY 

AFFECTTHE MATERIAL 

VALUE OF AN AD 



FOUND NECKLACE AND 
PENDANT on Whitney St. 
North in Grayslake, Thursday 
1/27/00. Must describe. (B47) 
692-2247.' , 

DID YOU FIND Somoonos 
PET or Special Lost Article? 
Call Lakeland Newspapors 
Classifieds Oept., and get your 
results, FOUND ads are 
RUN FREE of Charge. Call 
(847)223-8161. 



125 


Personals 



219 



Help Wanted 
Pan-Time 



120 


Free 



ATTENTION 
CLASSIFIED 

flOUEfUiSERS 
It you haue placed classified 
advertising tuhh the Lake- 
land Newspapers you may re 
celue a misleading 
statement 

from another firm request 
Ing payment for this 
aduertls- 
Ing. To recelue proper cred- 
it to your account, all pay- 
ments for your Lakeland 
Newspapers advertising 
must be made as invoiced 
and directed to: 
Lakeland Newspapers 
P0 Bon 26B 

SO S. Whitney SI. 



FREE PICK UP SERVICE. I 
will haul away your unwanted 
row boat, canoe, or outboard 
motor FREE. Call (847) 
566-2819. 



HEALTHY WOMEN 

KlEfDIED 
$5000.00 Compensation 
Healthy woman, age 20-33. 
need- 
ed lo serve as anonymous egg 
donors. Donors will be 
required lo take medication, 
blood 
screening & under qq minor surgi- 
cal procodwo. We are Iniefesled 
in all ethnic backgrounds. 
Multiple 
locations available. II Interested 
call 
ARR 773-327-7315 
Serious Inquiries Only 



ATTENTION 

PET OWNERS 

WE DO NOT KNOWINGLY 

ACCEPT ADS FOR ANU 
MALS IN OUR FREE/ 

GIVE AWAY COLUMN. 
If you must give up your 
pet, please consider these 
facts. 

•Free animal ads suggest 
that thore is something 
wrong with the animal, or 
that il has no value. 
•Some people who re- 
spond to these froe animal 
ads are not reputable and 
are more concerned about 
making a prolit than the 
animal. 

•Charging a fee to a poten- 
tial pel owner confirms the 
responsibility of pet owner- 
ship for an entire lifetime 
of that pel. For more infor- 
mation, please contact the 
Humane Society. 



A BABY TO love and cherish 
is our dream . Our warm, 
happy home awaits your 
newborn. Expenses paid. 
Linda & Jerry 

888 447 14BS. 



ADOPT: YOUR BABY will 
be surrounded with love, 
laughter and all the opportu- 
nities life can offer. Exp. Pd. 
Debbie & Claude. 1-600-218- 
8418 



ADOPTION -YOU' A brave , 
caring person. We're an ac- 
tive adventurous .couple 
(both attorneys) who'd love 
to help. Let us give your 
baby a beautiful suburban 
home, sunny playroom, won- 
derful family traditions, exit- 
ing vacations, and all our 
iove SHERI & DAVID (888) 
356-6212 



ELDERLY CARE- 

Provided 24hrs in my Gur 
nee home. One phone call 
can save you SIOOO's & pro- 
vide better care for your 
loved one. Certified CNA. 
Call (847) B55-2721 



USA AND RICHARD rare 
anxiious to share their home 
, love laughter and a little 
shaggy dog with a newborn . 
Legal/ confidential. 800 21 B 
8418 

LOSE 20LBS FAST. 

Free Samples. 

S/Back Guaranteed. 

(630)213-1072. 

YOUR CELL WILL 

TELL..Get The Best Supple- 
ments. Healthy Life Nutrition- 
ist, Independent Sharklee Dis- 
tributor, (847) 740-2557 order 
by phone possible or call for 
appointment. Ask lor 15% Dis- 
count. 



WE NEED 

Plasma Donors 

Immediately. 

Earn $100 

in the 1st2wks! 

For info or appt. call 

414-654-1366 



WORK FROM HOME 

$450+ per month Part-time, 

S2.000 + per month Full-time. 

Free information 

(262) 591-4589 

www.cash91 1. com/providence 



Dental 
Hygienist 

Libertyville 

general dental office 

is seeking hygienist 

for part-time position. 

Wednesday & 

2 Saturdays 

a month. 

Please call 

847-367-5252 



<3 V 




ARE YOU SPRING CLEAN- 
ING?? GET RID OF THE 
CLUTTER AND RUN A 
FREE or GIVEAWAY Ad in the 
Lakeland Classifieds. Free 
and Giveaways are run at NO 
CHARGE! (We discourage 
any pet ads). Deadlines: 10am 
Wednesdays. (847) 

223-8161,0x1.140. 



C.E.O. 

Egg Donors Needed 

• Give (he gift of life to an infertile couple 

• Our program is completely anonymous 
24 hour/7 day support 

• AppointmenLs available for evenings and weekends 

$5 ,000 Compensatio n 

Call Nancy Block 

847-650-8733 Pager 847-547-9788 

The Ccnler for Egg Options Illinois, Inc. 



SUMMER CAMP 
SUPERVISOR 

Supervise & train staff, 

plan activities, operate 

within given budget. 

8:30-1:00 each day. 

BA in Educ. or ECE, CPR 

& First Aid Cert. SI 3,50/hr. 

Fax resume/call for appt. 

(847) 223-2819 Llsa- 

Wlldwood Park District 

Fax (847)223-2820 



School Bus 

Monitors/ 

Drivers Aides 



110 


Notices 



110 


Notices 



C0LLEGE| 
ILLINOIS* 



Illinois Prepaid Tuition Program 

Phone Toll-free 1-877-877-3724 
www,collegeitlinois.com 



Worried about paying for college? 
Consider prepaid. 

■ Enroll by February 1 8, 2000 



SUBMIT YOUR LAKE- 
LAND CLASSIFIED ADS 
ON THE INTERNET! Visit 
http://www.lpnews.com/ to 
place your ads conveniently. 
Ads appear on the Internet, in 
all Lakeland Papers, The 
Great Lakes Bulletin and The 
Market Journal for only $19.75 
for 15 words, then 15c each 
additional word. 




W.0O/HR 



140 



Financial 



LOWER PAYMENTS! STOP 
late feesl Stop or reduce in- 
terest) Stop collector calls! 
FAMILY CREDIT COUNSEL- 
ING, Non-profit Christian 
Agency. RECORDED MES- 
SAGE 1-800-72229-7964 



■ Bring your kids 
to work option! 

■ Paid Training 

■ Paid Holidays 

■ Paid Vacation* 

■ Annual Bonuses 

■ Medlcal/Dantil & Life Ins. 

■ Tuition Aid up to *1 5oa/yr 

■ Various Shirts and hours 

Call today! 
847-244-1066 



X£y, 



tier 




HpSWMM 



C1 4 / Lakeland Newspapers 



CLASSIFIED 



February 4, 2000 






219 



liL'lp WnniL'il 
Part-Time 



219 



Help Wanted 
Part-Time 



HOMEWORKERS 

NEEDED 

$635 weekly processing 

mall. Easy! 

No experience needed. 

Call 1-800-652-8726 

Ext 2020 24 Hrs. 



office ctenneR 

needed at night. 

Couples 

encouraged 

to apply. 

S10/por hour 

[815)344-0120 



■Restauranl 

^| FAST, FUN, FRIENDLY . . . 
^ . . , ilirit w urds thai describe our 
^^ltUludi: toward customer service, 
^KITCHEN/COUNTER STAFF 
-^Full and Part Time 
rcvlnus restaurant experience 
clpful, but will inln. These post- 
hitis arc Ideal Tar hum en inkers, 
nlor citizens, sluilenls nr anyone 
lie looking for a pjrt time |<ih. 
For consideration, 
apply in person at: 
Burger King 
Hwy 41 & 173 
In Wads worth 
r call for an Immediate fnlcr- 
tw: I-888-3UK-IHRE, and enter 
ncailon code: 1 1 892. 
+HURGER KJNG+ 
EOE 



TEAM LEADER 

NEEDED 

To run a crew of technicians 

in the up & coming air duct 

cleaning industry. 

P/T,mayleadtor/T. 

Call Steve or Jim 

848-838-4280 



Sterling 
Autobody 

in the Grayslakc area is 
accepting resumes for the 

following position:A/P 
Clerk pari time 3 days per 
week. $ I0-1 2 per hour. Pax 
rcsumeto(8-i7)23MB0l 
between 8 a.m. and 
5 p.m. M - P 




Want to earn up to $250 per 
week and be your own boss? 

The Daily Herald is looking for adult, 
independent personnel for newspaper 
delivery in the Lake County area. 2-3 
hour routes available between the 
hours of 2 a.m. & 6 a.m., Monday thru 
Friday; 2 a.m. - 7 a.m., Saturdays, 
Sundays and Holidays. 

For more information call. . . 

(84=7) 427-4333 



HELP WANTED 

Inside Sales Part-Time 

We're looking for a few good people! 

Would you like lo he p.Tt of a dynamic sales and marketing team? 

Our busy classified telephone sales department is looking tor a lew 

good people with a strong customer-service, orientation ami good 

communication and sales skills. 

I lit (nullifications fur Hits position Include: 

* Self-confidence - and a positive altitude. 



• Comiininiciition anil nltonc skills. 



'Tiiiie-manaeemciii and omam/alional skills. 



Said skills 



Persistence and ilie nhiluv to handle rejection. 



Initiative. 



; A sense ol "humor. 



1 Customer -se rvice orientation 



ProhlcnwilviiiL' and decision-makine. 



Creativity. 



A desire lo learn 



• Ability m w ork with others. 



Sounds like you'.' Send'I : a* us your resume. We can oiler a good 

starling salary, a generous commission plan and opportunities for 

training and advancement. Mother's hours available. 

Lakeland .Publishers, Inc. 

Attn: Classified Manager 

30 S. Whitney St. 

Grayslakc. IL 60030 

l-ax (847", 223-2691 



TALK? 




to 



wJe/f y we } oe not i/te foS for r/ou ! 



Lakeland Newspapers Is looking for 
outgoing people who are looking for a great 
part-time job. 

You will be selling new and renewal 
subscriptions to 1 1 different Lakeland 
Community Newspapers & doing other 
customer service related work. 
Hourly wage & bonusl 

Monday-Thursday 5;00-8:30pm 
Saturday 9am-2:00pm. 
Hourly rate + commission. 



For interview 
call Kevin 
847-245-7500 




219 



Help Wanted 
Part-Time 



CLEANING 
SERVICE 

Woman wanted lo work lor 

cleaning service, 

5 mornings a week. 

Call 

(B47) 223-0729 



Leading technology 

focused mortgage 

company seeks 

Independent Loan 

Originator. 

Flexible hours, high 

commission potential. 

All l raining and support 

available. Call 

1-877-881-1049 

or e-mail 

brucelOaoVcapmtq.com 

for more Information. 



RECEPTIONIST 

Busy physician's office 
has an immediate 

opening for a 

PT receptionist. 

Previous medical office 

experience preferred, 

but not required. 

Ability lo speak 

Spanish a plus. 

Please fax or 

mall resume to: 

102 Center Street, 

Graysfake, IL 60030 

(847) 223-9878 



Special 
Writer 



Writer with fluid, 

journalistic style" 

needed to handle 

markci-oricnted 

assignments in Lake 
County area. Can 
work in office or 

from home. Handle 

own scheduling. 

Ability to produce 

crisp, focused copy 
quickly a must. 

Photography ability a 

plus. Send cover let- 
ter and resume to: 

Bob Schroerler 
General Sales Manager 
Lakeland Newspapers 
P.O. Box 268 
Grayslakc, IL 60030 

jb j|t jk. jjt jk ik. 



220 



Help Wonted 
Pull-Time 



•SALES REPS* 

$45,000-65,000 first year, No 
cold calling, National Com- 
pany, Television Advertis- 
ing provided, appointments 
provided, immediate training. 
For your future, call; Pat 
Johnson, 1-800-668-3660 

***G0V'T POSTAL 

JOBS*** Up to S18.35 hour. 
Now hiring/99-2000, free call, 
application/examlntion Infor- 
mation. Federal hire lull bene- 
fits. 1-800-598-4504 exten- 
sion 1005 (8-6pm c.s.t. 7 
days). (SCA Network). 



♦STYLIST 

*NAILTECH 

*MAKEUP ARTIST 

Flex. Hrs. Please Apply 

in Person or Call 

OFF BROADWAY 

4949 Grand Ave., Gurnerj 

847-662-6603 



AIM HIGH CAREER opportu- 
nities for High School 
Grads.l If you're between the 
ages of 17-27 the Air Force 
can prepare you for a career 
In life. Benihts include; 
'HIGH TECH TRAINING 
•TUITION ASSISTANCE 

•MEDICAL & DENTAL CARE 
•EXCELLENT PAY *UP TO 
$12,000 ENLISTMENT PAY 
Enlistment bonus for those 
who qualify. For Information 
packet call 1-800-423-USAF 
or visit our website at 
www.alrlorce.com. AIR 

FORCE 



ARE YOU CONNECTED? In- 
terne! users wanledlll Poten- 
tial earnings of $350-5800 
weekly. 1-888-827-2999 

www.work-4-yourself.com 



220 



Help Wanletl 
Full-Time 



ASSEMBLY AT HOME. 

Arts, crafts, jewelry. Also elec- 
tronics, sewing, typing In your 
spare time. GREAT PAYI No 
experience needed. Will train. 
1-BO0-591-1860 ext. 3 
(24hrs.). (SCA Network). 



BILLER EARN UP TO 
$40K PER YEAR. Easy Med- 
ical Claims Processing. Train- 
ing provided. Computer re- 
quired. No previous experi- 
ence necessary. Flexible 
hours. 888-660-6693, ext. 115 
(SCA Network). 

BUSINESS OWNERS. AC- 
CEPT major credit cards. 
Free setup. Absolutely NO UP- 
FRONT CHARGES. Regard- 
less of size, age, credit. 48 
hour setup. Increase sales, 1- 
800-908-001 1 



nTTENTION 
'CLASSIFIED 

ROUCRTISERS 

If you hauc placed classified 
aducrtlsing with the Lake- 
land Newspapers you may 
recelue a misleading state- 
ment from another firm re- 
questing payment for this 
aduerllslng. To recelue 
prop- 
er credit to your account, 
all payments for your Lake- 
land Ncujspapers 
aduerllslng 

must be made as Inuoiccd 

and directed to: 

Lakeland Newspapers 

P0 Dok 268 

3G S. Whitney St. 



DATA ENTRY NATIONAL 
Billing Service seeks a full/part- 
time medical billor. Salary at 
S46K per year. PC required. 
No experience neoded. Will 
iraln. Call 1-888-646-5724 
(SCA Network). 

DRIVER- COMPANY DRIV- 
ERS and owner operators. 
Call today and ask about our 
Great new Bonus packages! 
Boydd Bros. 800-543-8923 
(00's) call 800 633-1377 E. 
O.E.. , 

DRIVERS - DO YOU WANT 
GUARANTEED HOME 

TIME? It's yours by calling 1- 
800-247-6040. SMITHWAY 
MOTOR EXPRESS. Earn- 
ings to .39 cents a mile. 
COMPLETE BENEFIT PACK- 
AGE! www.smxc.com 

DRIVERS - NEW 2K PAY! 
ORT; 6mo. exp. -30/cmp. 
.Top Pay ,40/cpm. REGional; 
,.36/cpm Jump start lease 
programl MS Carriers 1-800- 
231-5209 EOE 

DRIVERS- NO EXXXPERI- 
ENCED needed. 2 week CDL 
training provided. Earn 528- 
32,000/yr. with full benefitts. 
P>A>M> transport Toll-Free 1- 
877-443-8797 or apply on 
line al www.ortdrivers.com 

DRIVERS- ORT LOOK AT 

THE GAP BETWEEN PRO- 
MICE AND PERFOR- 
MANCE... WE DELIVER 
HEARTLAND EXPRESS. 
Call us first .then compare- 
we're that good. Class A CDL 
required Call toll free 1-877- 
763-7483 



EARN UP TO 35K/YR. Work 
from home doing data entry. 
.Will train. Computer required. 
Call loll free 877-209-7070ext. 
509. (SCA Network), 



EASY WORKI 
NO EXPERIENCE 

5500-51 ,000 part-time at 

home stuffing envelopes. 

For free information send 

self-addressed, 

stamped envelope-; 

R&J Enterprises 

Mailing Services, Inc. 

P.O. Box 402 
inglesido, 111.60041. 



EMERGING COMPANY 

NEEDS Medical insurance 
billing assistance immediately. 
If you have a PC you can 
earn $25,000 to $50,000 an- 
nually. Call 1-800-291-4683 
Depl. #107 (SCA Network). 



FRIENDLY TOYS AND 
GIFTS wishes to thank our 
customers, hostesses, deal- 
ers tor their record breaking 
1999 hundreds won $1,000 
prlzosl For year 2000 Infor- 
mation 1-800-488-4875 



220 



Help Warned 
FuU-Tlmc 



Full/Part Time 

FOOD SERVICE 

WORKERS 

Excellenl Hours! 

Great Payl Hiring Bonusl 

Please Call 

847-270-3083 



INTERNATIONAL COMPA- 
NY EXPANDING. PC Owwn- 
ers/ Internal users needed! 
Greal benefits; Full training. 
$25K to S75K potential 
FT/PT. Toll free (888)310- 
8813 

www.asap2- 
day.com 

MEDICAL BILLING EARN 

excellent $5$ processing 
claims Irom home. Full training 
provided. Computer required. 
Call Medi Pros loll free. 1-888- 
31 3-6049 ext. 31 28 ( SCA Net- 
work). 



POLICE 

DISPATCHER 

Position open for FT 

Apply in Person 

3720 Groontoaf Ave. 

Island Lk. IL. 60042 

E.O.E. 



REPRESENTITIVE , TO 
WORK w/HS Internationa! 
students and host lamlics. 
Exp. required. Should be will- 
ing to host. Call 1-800-266- 
8510 or 1-414272-0323 

SMITH TRANSPORT HAS 

new openings in the Midwest 
and OTR fleets. We have se- 
lect opportunities Including: 
COMPLETE BENEFIT PACK- 
AGE, 401 K PLAN, VACA- 
TION/HOLIDAYS. 1 year OTR 
experience. 23 years of ago. 
CALL RECRUITING TODAY 1 • 
B8B-778-9770, M-F 8AM- 
BPM, S-S 8 AM-5PM. . 

START YOUR OWN BUSSI- 
NESS I Sel your own sched- 
ule. Control your own in- 
come, at work through fun- 
draisers. AVON REPRE- 
SENTATIVE. CALL (688)942- 
4053 



TELLER 

Previous cash handling 

Is essential. 

For more details 

apply In person at 

Fox Lake 

Currency 

Exchange 

14 E.Grand Ave. 

Fox Lake, IL 

847-587-5431 



UNION 
CARPENTERS 

WANTED 
call 

RESIDtnTlflL 

cfiRPtnTRv inc. 

(630) 529-5520 



WILDLIFE JOBS TO 

521.60/hr. Inc. benefits. Game 
Wardens, Security, Main- 
tenance, Park Rangers. No 
exp. needed. For app. and 
exam Info call 1-800-813- 
3585, ext, 4221, 8am-9pm, 
7/days fds. Inc. (SCA Net- 
work). 



• PRODUCTION 
SUPERVISOR 

WE ARE a leading manufacturer 
ol soft good components in nood 
ot an expd, hands-on Production 
Supervisor. To join our team, you 
must have: 

• 2-4 yrs exp in a 
manufacturing 

environment 

• 1 yr exp. as a 
Production 
Supervisor 

• Ability to lead and train 
employees 

• Mechanical Aptitude 

• Knowledge of 
scheduling and 
directing a dept. 

• Bilingual in Spanish a 
plus 

WE OFFER o competitive bene- 
fits pkg & a salary commensurate 
w/exp & education. 

IF YOU meet these requirements, 

sand/lnx (847-395-6862) rosume 

w/salary history In confidence to: 

Human Resources Dept. 

NUWAY SPEAKER 

PRODUCTS, INC. 

905 Anita Ave., Antioch, IL 60002 

UNuWay 



220 



Help Wanted 
Full-Time 



220 



Help Wanted 
Full-Time 



MAID NEEDED 

Experienced and Reliable 

Full Time Mold Needed 

for Luxury Apartment 

Community. 

References Required, 

start todayl 

♦ (B47) 356-S007 ♦ 



RETAIL SALES 

Picture Frame 

store needs 

FT/PT career minded 

employee. Apply @ 

The Frame Forum 

724 n. Western Ave, 

Lake Forest 



P.M. SUPERVISOR/ A SST. 

DIRECTOR OF FOOD SERVICES 

FT needed for evenings (12-8 p.m.). Must be a icam 
player & able to assume cook responsibilities. Past 
management exp. desired. Food service & sanitation 
certificate desired but not required. 

Send resume or apply In person at: 

CARE CENTRE OF WAUCONDA 

176 THOMAS CT. 

WAUCONDA, EL 60084 

C847) 526-5551 
C847) 526-0807 FAX# 



Restaurant 



Starbucks Coftee Company 




This is your kind of place! 

Opportunities exist at our Northern Suburb 
and North Shore stores for: 

BARISTAS (HOURLY PARTNERS) 
SHIFT SUPERVISORS 

Vt'c are seeking individuals with a passion for people 
and customer service. Supervisory- experience preferred 
for shirt supervisor candidates. 

STORE MANAGERS 
ASSISTANT STORE MANAGERS 

Candidates will have 2+ years management experi- 
ence, I'&L responsibilities, strong team building, orga- 
nizational and sales building skills. Retail or restaurant 
experience preferred. 

For HOURLY opportunities, pteasc visit your local 
Starbucks store and fill out an application. 

For MANAGEMENT opportunities, please send/fax 
resume to:Starhucks Coffee Company, Attn: N. Suburbs 
Recruiter. 1165 N. Clark St., Suite 413, Chicago, JL 
60610 or FAX (312) 7S7-5605. 
Email: mldwestjobs@s1arbucks.com. EOE. 
www.starbucks.com 




How To 

Survive 

The Job 

Search 

By Nancy Sakol 

Dear Search, 

Q: 1 was fired from my job yesterday from (name withheld), and I can't 
get anyone lo I Istcn to me. I started my job diree wee ks age. I really I Iked 
it. During the lime I worked there I made a lot or friends and enjoyed 
going to work. I missed a day of work the first week because] had ■ cold. 
The second week, I couldn't find anyone to watch my son because he 
had (he day off school and couldn't slay home alone. That same week, 
my door locks on my car froze and I couldn' I gel the doors open to get to 
work so I missed another day. The following day while getting ready to 
go back to work I couldn't gel my car started and had to call Tor some* 
one to try and jump the car. 1 couldn't find anyone until that evening. I 
returned to work (his past Monday and I was asked lo report to 
Personnel as soon as I walked In. I was (old my services were no longer 
needed and I was hantledmyfinal pay check. They said they were releas- 
ing me due lo poor attendance. I asked them not to let mega and lo give 
me another chance but Ihey said they couldn't. I co uld understand them 
being concerned about my attendance, but none of this was my fault 
and I am angry thai they couldn't understand that. I know It will not 
help lo get my job back a ( this polnl , but should a company be so quick 
lo fire people who are good at what they do for circumstances that are 
out of their control? M. W. - Mundcleln 

A: I am sorry to hear that you lost a Job that you realty liked. The Idea 
here Is not lo dwell on losing the job, but lo chalk It up as a teaming 
experience. The company you mentioned is a fine company who prides 
itself on being very employee oriented and therefore has employees 
who enjoy coming lo work. Because you had recently started your job 
with (hem you established an unfortunate pattern wflh litem from the 
start. As I understand It, you began your position on a Monday and 
missed a day your first week. The following week you missed 3 days, So 
that means, out of a possible (en working days, you missed 4 days of 
work. That would have been enough lo concern any employer of a 
potential problem. Regardless of ihe fact that you state that none of the 
problems were your fault, they were also not your employer's problems. 
Your employer merely hired you to work a 40-hour work week that you 
had yet to accomplish. If you really enjoyed whal it is you did there, find 
a company that has a comparable line of business and try to apply for a 
Job with them. A Tew suggestions for you however, I would not use the 
company (hat you recently left as a business reference, unless you have 
no problem with litem starting the reason you were terminated. 
Contrary lo what you may believe there are many, many companies out 
there that do understand when employees have problems that arise. In 
your case, you were establishing what th cy felt was a bad pattern, or bad 
luck, and they decided to opt for cutting their losses. I would also sug- 
gest (hat you find yourself a back-up means to child care for those days 
when your child is off school and needs to be attended lo, and I would 
sec to It thai you hove a can of "lock- thaw" on hand, us well as seeing to 
It that your car Is "winterized," 

Send ytiur Inquiries to our new website 

www.jupfriorpcnonnel.coni 

Note: Nancy Sakol li a licensed personnel professions! 

and President of Superiari'erMnnel In Gurnee. 

Letlen can be ien( lo Nancy Sakol 

c/o Lakeland Newspapers, 

P.O. Uoi2C8, Grayslakc, I L 60030 

PMCElPaoLcom 







February 4, 2000 



220 



Help Wanted 
Full-Time -1 



220 



Help Warned 
Full-Time' 



I LOOK CARE/ 
MiUNTENANCE 



FT JANITOR NEEDED 
M-F WITH SOME MAIN- 
TENANCE RESPONSIBIU- 
TIES. MUST WORK WELL 
INDEPENDENTLY & DEA 
GOOD TEAM PLAYER. 
PREVIOUS FLOOR CARE 
EXR HELPFUL BUT WILL 
TRAIN. 
APPLY IN PERSON AT: 
CARE CENTRE OF 

WAUCONDA 

176 THOMAS CT. 

WAUCONDA, IL 60084 

(847)526-5551 



CLEANERS 

Immediate openings 
for cleaners In our 

Lake Zurich 

Intermediate Care 

Facility. 

Part time 

& 

Full time 

positions available. 

Will be responsible 

for cleaning women 

resident homes, , 

within the facility. 

If Interested, contact 

ML St. Joseph 

847-438-5050 




TURRET PUNCH 
PRESS OPERATOR 



(Fabrication Dcpi.) 

DAY SHIFT- FULLTIME 

Experience preferred, but will train. 

Please apply In person 

8:30 a.m. - 5 p.m. 

or fax resume: (847) 367-8981 





Since 1947. foodservlcc equipment (hat deliver*! 

1551 Mccormick Ave. Mundelcln^IL 60060 

equal opportunity employer m/f 



SUBSTITUTE 
DIRECTORY 

The following schools need 

substitutes on a continuing basis, please contact the 
names listed below for further information. 

Requirement - Bachelor's Degree 
& Substitute Certification 



Aplakistic - Tripp School District #102 

1231 Weiland Road, Buffalo Grow, 1L6008 1 ) 

Contact: Laurel Karolczak. . . . (847) 634-5338 

Dccrficld School District #109 
517 Deerficld Road, Dcerfick), IL 60015 

Contact: Denlse DiClcincnli x222. . . . (847) 945-1844 

Grass Lake School District #36 
26177 W. Grass Lake Road, AiHiocli, IL 60002 

Contact: Paul or Sue ' (847) 395-1550 

Grayslake Community High School, District #127 
400 N. Lake Si., Grayslake, IL 60030 

Contact: Marilyn xi2i4. (847) 223-8621 

Grayslake School District #46 
625 N. Barron bM. Grayslake, IL 60030 

Contact* }m?ahty xl 100 (847) 223-3650 

Gumee School District #56 
Spautdfug, OTIaine, & Viking Schools 
900 Kilnoum Road, Gumee, IL 60031 

Contact: Sheila. . (847) 336-0800 

Hawthorn School District #73 

201 Hawthorn Parkway, Vernon Hills, IL6O06l 

Contact: Sharl Keena. .(847) 367-3279 

Lake Forest Elementary Schools 
95 W. Dcemath, lake Forest, IL 60045 

Contact: Karen Allie (847) 604-7423 

Lake Villa School District #41 
131 McKinlcy, Lake Villa, IL 600-16 

Contact: Kathy. , (847) 356-2385 

North Chicago Community Unit School District #187 
2000 Lewis Ave., North Chicago, IL 60064 

Contact: Mona Armstrong (847) 689-8150 

Round Lake Area School District #116 
316 South Rosedale Court. Round Lake, IL 60073 

Contact: Vicky Gonzalez-Gomez. (847) 546-5522 

Trevor Grade School District 
26325 Wilinol Road, Trevor. Wl 53179 

ContactMhowfa (262) 862-2356 

Woodland School District #50 

17370 Gages Lake Rd„ Gages Lake, IL 60030 

Co;//tfc/.Terry Lutz (847) 856-3605 



220 



Help Wanled 
Full-Time"- 



220 



Help Wanled 
Full-Time 



Machinist 

CNC MACHINE OPERATORS 

.Due lo our coniJntictJ growth and 
expansion this established North 
Suburban ISO 9002 manufacturer of 
machined pans Is seeking CNC 
Machine Operators mfih experience 
(a minimum of 2-5 yean preferred) . 
Must have the ability to perform off- 
sets, monitor/change looting and 
read blueprint micrometers/calipers. 
Requires good math skills. Previous 
cellular manufacturing exposure 
and/or work In a self -directed work 
(cam environment desirable. 

Qualified candidates v.111 be offered 
a competitive wage (based on expe- 
rience) and comprehensive benefits 
package Including 401K and ProOl 
Sharing. For Immediate considera- 
tion, call or forward resume to 
Human Resources at: 

Hello Precision Products 

60 J N. SkokJe llwy. 

Lake DhiiT,IL 60044 

PhonetCB47) 475-1300 

FAXi (847) 473-1306 

EOE M/F/P/V 



LIGHT WAKE MOUSE 
ALL-AROUND 

Dimes 



Great working envir 
onmentl Wc need a . 
friendly self-starter for 
. warehouse & all- 
around duties, we are 

a small growlrg 

company & wc offer a 

competitive starting 

salary and fully paid . 

health Insurance. 

Experience a plus or 

will train. Flexible 

hours possible. 

# Grow with us! * 

Fax resume 
(815) 759-SHOO 

or call 
(815) 759-9000 



• SHEAR HELPER 

(Fabrication Dept.) 

Full time - Day shift 
ForWift experience 

Please apply In person between 8:30 a.m. and 

5 p.m. or Fax resume to: (847) 367-8981 



ER-HOFFMANN 

Since 1<M7, foodservlcc equipment that delivers! 

1551 McCorralck Ave. Mundcleln, IL 60060 

equal opportunity employer m/f 



xaphlc 
;signer' 



We're looking' for a 
I "graphic designer** to join our team. 
Do you have experience 
with computers and graphic design 
' programs? If you do, 
then wc teach you the rest 
in tills entry level position. 

{Send your resume to NEAL TUCKER at • 

Lakeland Newspapers 

30 S.Whitney St. 
Grayslake, IL 60030 

loribx to 223-8810] 



PATROL OFFICER 

BOARD OF POLICE AND 

FIRE COMMISSION 

FOR THE VILLAGE OF ANTIOCH 



NOW ACCEPTING APPLICATIONS 

Wc offer a challenging career with excellent benefits. 
Starting salary for Patrol Officer is $33,8 12.38. These arc 
the minimum requirements. Other requirements may 
apply depending on the Department. Requirements are 
subject to cltangc without notice. 

AGE: 21 Years Old minimum age and 35 Years Old maximum 
age. 

CITIZENSHIP: US Citizen of National ol US; or an alien lawful- 
ly admitted lor permanent residence; or an 
alien authorized by the Immigration and 
Naturalization Service lo work in the US. 

DRIVER'S LICENSE: Valid Drivel's License. 

EDUCATION: High School Diploma or GEO Equivalent. 

RESIDENCY: 25 Miles radius of Village limits. 

VISION: Correctable to 20/20 and tree from color blindness. 

FULL COMPLETION OF APPLICATION AND 
ACCOMPANYING DOCUMENTS. 
BIRTH CERTIFICATE REQUIRED. 
PHYSICAL EXAM BY PHYSICIAN. 
OTHER: Ability to pass all selection and training requirements 
Must attend Orientation Program on February 24, 
2000; Physical Aptitude on February 26, 2000; and 
Written Test on March 4, 2000. Location far the 
Orientation, Physical Aptitude, and Written Test will be 
provided upon return ol the completed application. 

APPLICATIONS CAN BE PICKED UP ATTHE 

ANTIOCH POLICE DEPARTMENT 

882 MAIN STREET, ANTIOCH, ILLINOIS 60002. 

CUTOFF DATE IS FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 18, 2000. 

THERE WILL BE NO EXCEPTIONS. 



220 



Help Wanted 
■'■• FuU-Time 



220 



Help Wanled 
Full-Time 



220 



Maintenance Technicians 

NkhoJ* Aluminum Lincolnshire an ISO 9002 certified 
leader In the processing of cold rolled aluminum sheet b seek- 
ing qualified mainterumce technicians. The quail fi cations 
include knowledge and proficiency In vwldlng/gas cutting, 
hydraulics, pipe fitting, pumps, power transmission, lubrica- 
tion, rigging, shop machines • tools and equipment, basic elec- 
trical and pneumatic. 

Starting wage vAU be $18.28 for individuals successfully pass- 
ing the maintenance qualification test Additional wages 
Include a production bonus shared by all shop employees, 
quarterly safety bonus, yearly attendance bonus and 3-2-2 
premium. 

An excellent benefit package Including: Group Health, Dental, 
and life, a 401-K plan which Includes a 6.5% contribution by 
the Company after one year and a stock purchase plan! 
Please send resume to: 

Nichols Aluminum 

200 Schelter Road 

Uncolnshlre.IL 60069 

Aim: Stan Whlteman 

EOE/M/F/HA' 



>SjSJitW<iw. 







It 



ARE YOU PERSISTENT, 

DEPENDABLE, OUTGOING, 

RESPONSIBLE & ORGANIZED? 

Lakeland Newspapers has the perfect career 

opportunity for you in our exciting sales 
department. This job involves sales calls out- 
side the office so a dependable car is necessary 
We offer great benefits! 

• Salary plus Commission 

• Health Insurance 

• Dental Insurance 

• Disability & life Insurance 
•A Matching 401 K Plan 

• Gas Allowance 

• Phone Reimbursement 

So if you're self-motivated, highly organized, 

and very personable, you're sure to be a 

success. Experience a plus: but will (rain the 

right person. For an interview appointment call 

Bob Schrocder 

Lakeland Newspapers 

^ (847)223-8161x113 ^ 



■ 



o POLICE OFFICER o 

The Village of Round Lake Beach is seeking applicants to 
establish eligibility list for Patrol Officer & fill current 
openings. * 

QUAUFICATIONS 

• 21 to 35 years old & U.S. citizen 

■ High school graduate or equivalent 

• Valid Illinois driver's license 

• Good moral character & no felony convictions 

• Must be able to successfully complete physical agility 
test, written exam, oral board interview, background 
investigation, psychological & polygraph, as well as a 
medical examination; and ability to perform essential job 
functions. 

BENEFITS 

• Starting salary of $3-1,505, with Increase to $41,247 at 
one year 

• Medical, dental and life Insurance 

• Paid vacation, holidays, and sick leave 

Applications require a SlO NON-REFUNDABLE 
PROCESSING FEE & may be picked up at Round 
Lake Beacli Police Department, 916 VK Rollins Rd, 
Round Lake Beach, Mon - Sat, 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. 
Information on test dates and requirements are in 
application packer. 
Applications must be returned by February 15, 2000. 



Accounting 

FINANCIAL ACCOUNTANT 

Great Lakes Credit Union, a financial institution with 
over $300 million in assets', is looking for an 
Accountant. This individual will he responsible for 
developing and analyzing financial reports. 

.Successful candidate will possess a Bachelor's 
Degree in Accounting or Finance with a minimum of 
2 years related experience. Must be energetic and 
able to work In a fast-paced environment widi the 
ability to prioritize and meet deadlines. Strong inter- 
personal, analytical, communication and computer 
skills required. Proficiency in spreadsheet applica- 
tions a must Financial industry background a plus. 

To apply send/fax/c-mail resume with salary history 

to: Attention: Recruiting 2525 Green Bay Rd., North 

Chicago, II. 60064. 

Fax: 847-887-8798. 

F.-mail: .sliclrch@glcii.org . 

For other opportunities call our 

Job Line at 847-5784*909. EOE 




Help Wanted 
;'., Full-Time 



DIPSTICK 
OIL CHANG 



Full/Part Time 
Musi be friendly & 

clean cut. 

Apply in person 

147S.Rte. 12 

Fox Lake 

(847) 587-7007 



WE WANT YOU... 
YES YOU 



#ft 



Lester's Material 

Service Inc. 

Grayslake, IL 

Experienced CDL, 

Dump Drivers 

Call Darren for 

interview 

847-223-7000 xl43 



YWCA of Lake County 

Bilingual Outreach 

Specialist 

Full time w/benefits 

Responsible for initi- 
ating culturally sensi- 
tive women's health 
education, maintain 
client files, some cler- 
ical. Good communi- 
cation skills, bilingual 
(Spanish/English), 
and some computer 
skills necessary. Ex- 
perience in health 
education or social 
work preferred. Send 
resume to YWCA, 
2133 Belviderc Road, 
Waukegan, IL 60085 
or fax to (847) 662- 
4752. EOE 



J 



PARTS 
IMIENTORY 
ATTENDANT 

Entry lEuel position for self- 
starter to assist internal cus- 
tomers uiilh tool £ parts re- 
quests. Maintain muentory 
tracking 6 mm/max leuel 
Hust haue solid communication 
t compuler skills. W-13/rir. 

Apply at or mail/fan 
(847) E80-9264 resume lo! HE 
Director. PC! Energy Semites. 
One Energy Or. Lake Bluff. It 
BQQ44. Call (6471 £80-6100 
for directions, (ml 
E-mail- ghislaml@u«snaiL com 






<S0OTAREMEER > 

S. Central Pcnnsylvanla- 
Immcd Opening. The F.L. 
Smithe Machine Co. Inc. a mfr 
of highspeed precision enve- 
lope-making machinery & 
allied cqpmi loe'd In the mtns 
of S. Central PA, Seeks 
Software Engineer. Must pos- 
sess engineering degree 
w/exp In Industrial automa- 
tion controls. Must have 
strong software development 
as well as exp In the applica- 
tion of PLCs, mulii-axis servo- 
systems A I/O buses. Familiar- 
ity w/Glddlngs & Lewis & 
Allen A Dradley controls a def- 
inite pi us, We offer a full range 
of hnfts Including group tilth, 
denta! care, retirement, vaca- 
tion, holidays as well as a 
tuition reimbursement pro- 
gram. Loc'd In an area where 
recreational opptys such as 
fishing, hunUng. skiing, hiking 
& boating abound, yet Is rea- 
sonably close lo a major unlv. 
& several well-rccognlzed col- 
leges. Resume: Industrial 
Relations Dept, F.L. Smithe 
Machine Co. Inc. PO Box 36, 
DuncansvtUe, PA 16635 



«■ 



>;. v..:: 



r — 
— *- . , — 



i T n I'M i n il i ' J Ji iiMiii 



C 1 6/ Lakeland Newspapers 



CLASSIFIED 



February 4, 2000 






220 



Help Wanted 

Fiill-TiniL' 



PRESSMAN 

N. Georgla-lmmed Open- 
ing. SleeveCo, Inc. a flexi- 
ble packaging operation, 
seeks exp'd Press Opera- 
tor for 3rd shift. Hrs: M-F 
11p-7a. Must have 3-5 yrs 
exp running a ffexographic 
central Impression printing 
press, exp running solvent- 
based inks on wide web 
polyethylene lllm, prel'd. 
Comp wages & bnfts in- 
cluding 8 pd htdys, major 
med & 401 K plan w/co. 
match. Fax resume 706- 
216-3116. 



Engineering/Technical 



Immed Openings. Commun- 
ications ■ Pros. Network 
Provisioned A Engineers 
needed. Nal'l IP voice/data 
communications provider 
seeks exp'd technical St oper- 
ations pros. Musi have the 
ability to work independently 
on multiple pro|ects in a fast- 
paced environment St must 
have knowledge of CLEC pro- 
visioning, IP routing or related 
technologies. Must have mln 1 
yr exp in tclecommunlca 
tlons. College dcg., Cisco cert 
or equiv. exp req'd, Resume 
Sheila lleaion, Nexbell 
Communications, 300 Lena 
Dr, Aurora, Oil -11202; (B«H) 
365-3700; Fax 216-3-M-2610; 
mvw.ncxbell.com; E-mail 
heaton@ncxbell.com. Nexbell 
Communications is an EOE 



General Office 
I Office Assistant! 

[Growing construction I 
jcompany located in 

Graysl.ikc is looking 
[for a person to assist in [ 
It variety of office I 

duties in its casual, | 

non-smoking office. 

The position requires! 
la person who is orga-l 
Ini/.eU, sclf-motivated| 
land computer literate. 
130 to 40 hours a week. I 

[Competitive salary and| 

lhealth insurance. 

Call Debra at 
C847) 548-4488 



Come to 
The Silo 

Servers wanted to 

make some 

SREALS Money! 

Will Train 

Weekends 

Fulf-Time 

625 Rockland Rd. 

(Rt. 176) Lake Bluff 

N 



Rie 
43 



w 



Rie. 176 



Rla. 
41 



ELECTRONICS 
ENGINEER 



Manufacturer of process 
& laboratory instruments 
needs a hands-on electri- 
cal engineer. Successful 
candidate must have a 
good knowledge of elec- 
tronics, must have prob- 
lem-solving skills and 
must be a good commu- 
nicator. Additionally, a 
knowledge of ORCAD/ 
AUTOCAD and an instru- 
mentation background 
arc helpful. 

Salary requirements must 
be included for consider- 
at ion. Send resume in 
confidence to: 

HUMAN RESOURCES - 

Dept. H k-E" 

27640 Concrete Drive 

Ingleslde, IL 60041 



220 



Help Wanted 
Full-Time 



220 



Help Wanted 
Full-Time 



220 



Help Wanted 
Full-Time 



220 



Help Wanted 
Full-Time 



220 



Help Wanted 
Full-Time 



220 



Help Wanted 
Full-Time 



Clerical Positions 



Full Time 



Receptionist 



2ND AND 3RD SHIFT 



Data Entry Clerks 
Package Handlers 



Great Starter Positions 
Will train" 

AVAILABLE NOW 

• Apply In Person 



K&R TRANSPORTATION 

•3059 W. Washington 
k • Waukcgan, IL 






rsL-rr 




W"- ; LEGAL SECRETARY/ 
PARALEGAL 

Law firm seeks individual with good typing and organi- 
zational skills to perform paralegal duties In Litigation 
Department. Knowledge of Microsoft Office a plus. 
Excellent benefit package. 
Send Resume or Fax to 
860 Northpolnt Blvd., Waukegan, IL 60085 

Fax: C847) 887-8519 

Attn: Deborah Flgncrou \ 



N 



SPEECH LANGUAGE 
PATHOLOGIST 

Waukegan and/or Kenosha 
area LTC facilities. Experience 
In LTC prorerred. Will consider 
CFY. Please fax resume to 

(800) 722-8825 



DENTISTS 

Tucson, AZ-trrimed Open- 
ings. We need. 2 Dentists 
willing to relo io Tucson. 
Must have AZ He. Very 
good pay,, good team ap- 
proach. Dr, Munoz 520-573- 
1778; Fax resume 520-573- 
0B35. . 



K&R Transportation has the following openings: 

• DISPATCHER 1:00 PM-<H5 PM 
Typing skills & knowledge of city & suburbs. 

• WAREHOUSE SUPERVISOR 10:00 PM-6:45 AM 
Must have experience. 

Apply in person: 

K&R Transportation 

3059 W. Washington 

Waukegan, IL 




TRAVEL ADVISOR 



Lake Bluff AMEX rep agency seeks one 
more special leisure agent with Sabre 
experience arid one APOLLO agent with 
experience. Monthly bonuses, medical, 
dental, 40 IK. Come join our growing 
company & great team of professions. 

Call Dawn at 
C84T) 234-0300 xlOO 



Teachers 
& Assistants 



For state-of-the-art 

child care center In 

Lincolnshire Corp. 

Center 

Call Kathy 

847-634-1982 



MAINTENANCE 

An outstanding part 
time or full time opportuni- 
ty for a person experi- 
enced In plumbing, elec- 
trical and HVAC main- 
tenance. Our business Is 
located in Zlon. Phone 
847-498-4900 and leave 
your phone number or 
FAX your resume to 847* 
49B-3909 



-' 



1 



..- ■- ■ 



PRESS BRAKE OPERATOR], 



(Fabrication Dept.) 

FULL TIME-DAY SHIFT 

Experience preferred, but will train. 

Please apply in person 

8:30 a.m. -5 p.m. 

or fax resume to 847-367-8981 




-MO F=I=M AIM N 



Since 19-17, foodscrvlce equipment that delivers! 

1551 McCormlck Ave. Mundclcln. IL 60060 

equal opportunity employer m/f 



1 



i 



STOCKROOM/ 

OATAENTRY 



Night Shift 3 pm-1 am 
4 nights per week 

Experience preferred but will train 
Please apply In person 8:30am-5pm or fax resume. 



CARTER-HOFFMANN 

Since 1917. foodscrvlce equipment thai delivers! 

1551 McCormlck Ave. Mundcldn, IL 60060 

FAX: 847-367-6981 

EOE 



=f_l 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 M 1 1 1 1 1 J J 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 i 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 [ 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 l^r' 



School Bus Driver 



I we have a friendly 
working environment! 

I Wages ranging from $12.78 - $17.11 , 

| guaranteed five hours per day. Excellent 
| benefit package. Year 2000 "Bluebird" 
1 Transit-style buses. CDL license and 

Illinois bus permit preferred. 
5 Come join the Warren Blue Devil Team! 
§j Contact Tina M. Delabre 
s Director of Transportation 
| Warren Township 
i High School #121 
§ (847) 599-4787 

■=niiiniinNiiiiuiiiiimniiiiiiiniii ; « 





f>WWW V-NE^ii l 








Fast paced, growing 
■ NW Suburban 

Optometrist 
looking for f/p time 

oPTicmn/ 

OP TECH 

Exp. preferred, 

will train right person. 

Benefits available. 

847-362-3444 or 

847-541-1184 



Hah Aides 
Nurses Aide 

All shifts. Flexible 

hours. 4-Bed Group 

Home. Pleasant work 

environment. 

Competitive salary. 

Please apply at 

Itt)4 16th St. 

North Chicago 

(847) Z44-Z312 

EOf: 



Doctor's Office 
needs 

meoicflL 

ASSISTANT 

or 

enn 

with office experience. 

Must know how 

to take vitals. 

Full or Part lime 

Call 
847-662-0350 




CNA/AIDES 

Seeking 

CNA/AIDES 

to work in our , 

Lake Zurich 

Intermediate 

Care Facility 

(or 

Developmenlally 

Disabled Women. 

Full and Part lime 

positions available, 

most shirts. 

Willing to train, 

experience riot required. 

Contact Ml. St. Joseph 

847-438-5050 



NIGHT 
AIDES 

Immediate position 

available in our 

Lake Zurich 

Intermediate Care 

Facility 

for Developmenlally 

Disabled Women. 

Hours required: 

9PM to 6AM. 

weekends are a must. 

Experience 

not required. 

If Interested, contact 

Mt. St. Joseph 

847-438-5050 



♦PHARMACIST 



NW Wlsconsinlmmed Open- 
inn. Dedicated to continuing 
our i mUtUm of 50 yrs or car- 
ing for families in the St. Croix 
River Wiley. Holy Family 
Hospital Is in 1'hasc I of con- 
duction for new hospital/ 
clinic complex. Offering small 
town selling w/mctro conve- 
nience, great work environ- 
ment, friendly co-workers, 
flex hrs. IVT or ITT opening 
for llosp Pharmacist able to 
work both Independently St 
In team setting. Wl lie req'd. 
Up to lot) hrs of paid time off 
after 90 day. hlih, disability, 
dental St retirement savings 
program. Resume: MR, Holy 
Family Hospital, 535 Hospital 
Rd. New Richmond, WI 
5KH7; (715) 216-2101; Fax 
(715) 21 3-7203. EOE 



£■'" " i ■) 

Health Cars 

X-RAY TECH 
PHLEBOTOMIST 

Our Clinic In Graphite lias an excel 
lent full time position available. Tin: 
Is a Monday thru Friday [Million (h 
or 10 hour shifts) wlili im call, week 
cndi nr holidays. Tn qualify, )uu must 
be licensed In IL and possess plile 
botomy skills, 2-3 years eapcrienct 
preferred. 
Wc provide an excellent salary and 
benefits. Please apply In person mi 

•.end/Tax resume to: 

Cindy Hall 

Human Resources 

(847) 360-4 170 

VICTORY 

MEMORIAL HOSPITAL 

1 32-iN. Sheridan Rd. 

Waukegan, IL(itH)H5 

Fax:(H(7)36fM230 

cmallJmmanrcsourccs® 

iconncci.net 

Equal ojijorlunity enipiojvr m/f/h/t 



MEDICAL OFFICE 
COORDINATOR 



Our busy 
ophthalmology prac- 
tice is looking Tor a 
dynamic Individual for 
the coordinator posi- 
tion in our Vernon 
Hills office. 
Responsibilities 
Include optical, med- 
ical and front desk. 
Benefits include med- 
ical, dental, life Insur- 
ance, pension and 
401(k). Call Janice at 
(847) 244-1657 
or fax resume to 
(847) 244-5122. 



FRONT DESK/ 
MEDICAL TECH 



Lake County ophthal- 

mology/optometry 

practice seeks bright, 

I energetic individual for| 

this full time position. 

Excellent salary and 

benefits. 

Call Janice at 

(847) 244-1657 x26 

or fax resume to 

(847) 244-5122 



********************************** 

* 
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C.NJV.s 

Our 1 13-bcd skilled nursing facility employs only- 
high quality C.N.A.s. 

Wc offer excellent starling pay. S9.75/hr. + .75 

extra on weekends (SI an hr. shift differential on $ 

1 1-7 shift) and top benefits to qualified applicants.* 

Apply at: 

Care Centre of Wauconda 

1 76 Thomas Ct, 

Wauconda, IL 60084 

(847) 526-5551 Fax: (847) 526-08072 

********************************** 



* 
* 
* 



PSYCHIATRIC NURSE 

or NURSE 

PRACTITIONER 

Immed Opening. Alaskan 
tribal healthcare carp. Min: 
ANP & certification as a 
Clinical Nurse in psychia- 
tric & mental health nurse 
w/current AK lie. Pref'd: Pre- 
scriptive Authority. Respon- 
sible tor the diagnosis & 
treatment o( patients w/seri- 
ous psychiatric disorders. 
Exp w/chemical abuse re- 
covery process very help- 
ful. Pre-employment drug 

screen req'd. 
907-442-7662; E-mail bpet- 
tit@maniilaq.org for applica- 
tion, Manillaq Association 
is EEO/M/F/AA/lndian Pref- 
erence Employer In Kotze- 
bue, AK. 



Sales 

Victory Community Elder- 
CARE has excellent <ip- 
portimtites available for: 
COHI'OH VIC ELDEK- 

CARE COORDINATOR 

In iliis p.ni ilute puMiinii, \iiii 

Mill lie res|Hii^i1)k' fur itmnli- 

iuiIiik ilih new program us w 

liilnidiii-L' it In area enipliijers. 

Tn nullify, jnit slmulil possess 

a ill-pit; in iii.li luiinj: nr a 

niili-il an-j almif; uiili excel- 

li hi oiiiimmiiwilnii ami linn- 

puiiT^kllls, 

Please cail or send 

resume to: Cindy Ball 

Human Resources 

VICTORY MEMORIAL 

HOSPITAL 

1324 N. Sheridan Rd. 

Waukegan, IL 600B5 

Ph: (847) 360-4170 

Fax: (847) 360-4230 

einull; liiitiuiiri'stiurceA® 

Iconncci.ncl 
Eciuul Oppurliinllv Emplmer 
fcW' — 



QMRP/ 

Residential 

Service Director 

Small iji-rjiip homes 

luoklnrj lor a ttMHI! Tills 

person mu.st liiive a DA 

Degree In Human Services 

Held. Must liuvu worked 

u1U) MJL popul.iiloii (or nt 

least 1 year. Supervisory 

experience Is needed. 

Please send resume to: 

ISD4 16th St 

North Chicago, ILGOOU4 

or fax resume to 

&47-473-330O 



Primary 
Therapist 

Helena. MT-Immcd Opening 
Serves as Case Mjy w/in a 
multldfsclptlnar}' treatment 
leant working w/cinotlunall)' 
dhiiulicii adolescents, Works 
to facilitate Individual, tirotip 
& raniily therapy. I'ciforms 
psycho-social assessments, 
social & develiioiiU'iit.il lilv 
tiirics & treatment & dis- 
charge plans. Rcqs Master's 
Oillin social work, counsel- 
Inn, psychology or related 
field St 2 yrs exp w/einotlon- 
ally disturbed children In 
therapy. Must lie cIIk- f«r 
licensing. Starts at 129,61 'J- 
*33.363/yr l>OQ w/exc 
bnfts; Open until filled. 
Submit SIIODAIR applica- 
tion, supplemental question- 
naire & college transcripts. 
SIIODAIR Hospital, HR. 2755 
Colonial Dr, PO Box 5539. 
Helena, MT 596<M; (-i(Ki) 

■Wi-750() or (800) 417^5611 

' ]| 



Aurora Medical Center 

® AuroraHcalthCarc* 



CLINICAL DIRECTOR - OR/OB/GI 

Aurora Medical Center • Kenosha, one ol Wisconsin's newest state-ol 
Ihe-art acute care hospitals, is searchino lor a Clinical Direclor lo lead 
ils last growing ambulatory and inpatient Surgical Care, Gl services, 
and Women's & Infants services. We feature a unique, patienl-cenlered 
and (amily focused philosophy and design. Our employees are devoted 
lo providing excellent service and suppor,ling the healing process. 

Position lo the Sile Administrator/Chlol Nutse Executive, and con- 
tributes lo the successful achievement ol sito goals lo provide high qua! 
ily, customer focused and cos! effective programs and services. 

Requirements Include: 
• RN licensure {MSN preferred) 

- Five or more years of progressive nursing 
management experience 

- OR experience 

- Highly developed leadership skills 

- Commitment to service excellence and team work 

We olfer the opportunity tor personal and professional growth, as well 
as |he opportunity to becomo pait ol Ihe Aurora Health Care leam, 
Wisconsin's largest not-for-profit Hoalth Care system. 

We olfer a comprehensive salary and benolil package, and encouiago 
service-oriented professionals to subrnil their resume lo: 

Aurora Health Care-South Region 
Attn: Gene Krauklis ■ VP Human Resources 
333 Emerson St. 
Burlington, Wl 53105 
Fax: 262-767-6463 

Wo supporl a safe, heallhy and drug- Ireo work environment through 
pre-employment drug screening. 

Equal Opportunity Employer 
M/F/D/V 



y 



j 



February 4; 2000 



CLASSIFIED 



Lakeland Newspapers/ C 1 7 



220 



Help Warned 
Jull-Timc 



220 



Help. Wanted 
Full-Time 



! 



GENERAL OFFICE 

To$10/hr. Friendly 

co-workers 

welcome pitch-in 

attitude. Phone 

- skills, light 

computer and good 

eye for detail. 

244-0016 or 

549-0016 

Superior Personnel 



Healthcare 

REGISTRAR 

Full time position anJbble al the 
new Victory Surgical .Treatment 
Center in Undenhurfl. You will be 
responsible for registering all 
(MLlcJits and performing clerical 
duties. Qualified candidates must 
have good communication and 
computer skills. Knowledge of 
medical terminology Is preferred. 
We offer a full benefits package and 
campctlUre salary. Call (847) 356- 
4551 or apply In person; VJrtory 
lakes Continuing Care Center, 
1055 East Grand Avenue, 
Undenhurfl, IL 60046, eoe 



New Restaurant 

*Waitstaff 
'.'* Line Cook 
* Dishwasher 

* Busser 
* Host/ Hostess 

Apply in Person 

9am to 3pm 

Grandma V's 
Pancake House 

10 E. Maple 

(Rte.176&45) 

Mundelein 

847-949-4960 



ENTRY jLjEVEL 
REPORTER 

Lakeland Newspapers is 
looking (or someone with 
a passion for journalism. 
This full-lime entry level 
position will give the right 
candidate a chance to get 
his or her foot in the door 

as a local community 

journalist, covering the full 

gamut of stories that 

happen weekly In 

Lake County villages. 

Please send or FAX 

resume with cover letter to: 

Lakeland Newspapers 

Robert Ward e 

P.O. Box 268 

Grayslake, Illinois 

60030 

FAX: (847) 223-8810 

12 : _5I 



THE BEST INN HOTEL OF LIBERTYVILLE 



is searching for 
Front Desk Guest Representatives 

Absolutely must be professional, flexible, 

customer service oriented and a team player. 

Outstanding pay, benefits and working 

environment. Join our winning team. 

Apply In person at 1809 N. Milwaukee. 

EOE. 



k 
k 

k 
k 

k 

k 
k 
k 

k 
k 
k 

i 

* 

* 

* 
* ■ 



Security Officers Wanted 

We ire now recruiting pmfenloiul security ufJlrm to work In upscale estate, 
rtslilcnilil, school anil commercial locations. Job may Include shift work, 
i'ussculnn of a I'KRC cant Is preferred, but not required. Immediate opening*. 
Successful applicants will have to pass a background and Gngerpiint check. Valid 
driver's license and a high school diploma or eiruholcnl. Interested applicants 
should pick up a application at: 

Mill Creek Protection Services 

Graytlake High School 

400 N. Lake St. 

Graytlake, IL 60050 or call 548-1757 

Equal opportunity employer. 



Administrative Assistant 



Are you looking to utilize your skills? 
Innovative company in Arlington Heights needs 
qualified individuals to fill several high-profile 
positions. Must be proficient in MS Word, Excel, 
& PowerPoint. 

Call Tricta today! 
V(847) 520-7300 or Fax (847) 465-2028 v 



if- 

3d 

IS, 

3d 
3d 



in- 
al- 



RclaurantOpportJivlics 



>£*UH 



iii j^iter-t^uille 




ICll 

m, 



A gf Ml nofghbor food takcry-ufo concept thai cares about 
(hotr assodaUt-thal's what Panora Broad is all aboutl 
Wo arc Ik fad k( ■ giowinq baknf y - cafes In America and 

currently lawopporuinliies for Managers, fiMgupcrvisorc , 

Balntrt, Qanrjwlcri Makers, Food Preppert and Cashiers al 

our now bakery -cala in Ubertyvllo- 

But enough about us...wo want 
to know about youl 

Are you looking for: 
•Aftirv^atrraspSarflr 1 -Anrfl^iirujlolfarnarswsil? 



)h 



•ftowfjipotarfial? 
■AlkdWedi«?[IW 
fcfrnotSertwilhcMrJrw) 



• An eolarf dating salary? 

•VWeJbwflts? 

•40l(k)|faif* 



Ifuour answer is YEfi— then phase apply in person 

ab Panora Broad, 830 fiouui Milwaukee Avenue, 

foOtoltf/fowcal(M7)6(M-4765 

Equal Opportunity Emptoyw 



220 



ildp.Wanted' 
Full-Time 



(JP^ "\ 




ye© 


•-*t*P Experienced 




Groomor Wan'tod 


J '"^■''i. •'.I 


. Full Time 




L-r.B.C. Dog Training 


iiyf'7 Grooming & Pot 


IT Jfi 


f Supply 




847-566-1960 


lV*L^ 


AskForCathlo 



•j inmiin jniiiiiiliiiirirntim e- 



Full or Part Time I 

needed for Richmond 
Preschool. Call Michelle 
815-675-6333 



.-ininitiiiiiu ii minimi iiiiiiiiniiirinr. 



Reservationist 

Full time days. 
Excellent benefits. 
Gall (847). 74 0-9301 



Fast paced, growing NW 

suburban Optometrist 

looking for full time 

FRONT DESK 

RECEPTIONIST 

Exp. preferred, will train 

fight person. 

847-362-3444 

or 847-541 -t 184 



FACTORY UJORH 

light rnfg., dean, sort, 

package parts 6 some punch 

press work. Apply within. 

Fibre Fabricators Co Inc. 

7517 Uleyer Rd. 
Spring Grove, it 60081 



MACHINISTS 

Seattle, WA Area-lmmed 
Opening. 5-axls CNC-.& 
manual tool & cutter Grin- 
ders, all shifts. 401 K & 
profit share, 

253-854-7777. 



Front Counter Sales 

Seasonal Help 

Needed - Busy Hrs. 

Contact: Linda 

Goodyear 

223-7000 ext:1 11 



OPTOMETRIST 

NE Missouri -Imrned Open- 
ing. Are you tired of the 
big city, fierce compete- 
tlon, paperwork & working 
wknds? F/T position avail 
w/Byr old est'd clinic in 
NE Missouri. Friendly, ca- 
sual Christian at- 
mosphere, call after hrs 
217-656-4152; 
E-mail4eyes@adam3 .net 



Full-time dental recep- 
tionist wanted for busy, 
quality-oriented Vernon 
Hills Dental practice. 1 
evening. No weekends. 
If you are self-motivated, 
enthusiastic and have 
good communication 
skills, please call 

(847)367-6410 



PRINTING-PREPRESS 
Kennewlck, WA- Immod 
Openings. Growing Ken- 
newick, WA hi quality 
sheelfed co. seeks PRE- 
PRESS TECHS able to 
work In a Mac environ- 
ment; scanning, trapping, 
Imposing, & imaging. 
509-586-7858; 
Fax 509-588-3153. 



BED MAKER 

& 

HOUSEKEEPER 

Will train the right person. 
Hours are varied, 

some days, 

some evenings. 

Need to know English. 

Apply In person at: 

Care Centre of Wauconda 

176 Thomas Ct. 

Wauconda.lL 60084 

(847) 526-5551 

fax#{847)526-0807 



220 



Help Wanted 
Full-Time 



Lighting 

Showroom 

Sales 

Immediate opening for 

an outgoing & detailed 

minded Individual for our 

lighting showroom. 

Apply In person 

@ 

Warren Electric Inc. 

33261 N.Hwy 45 . 

Wildwood 

or fax resume to 

847-223-8693- 



Do You Love 
ChiLdnEN? 

Christian working 

environment & a friendly 

staff. If (his appeals to 

you please call or 
. apply in person al 

Little Lamb' 

Christian Preschool 

36448 N. Fuller Rd. 

Gumcc 

847-360-9O42 

Positions available: 

•Teacher's Aide 

• After K-Tcachcr 

• Preschool Teacher 

FT/TT 
Offering sign-on bonus 
Free child care 



225 



Business 
Opportunities 



25 WORDS + 13 MILLION 
HOMES = GREAT RE- 
SULTS. You can market your 
product to 13 million house- 
holds throughout North Ameri- 
ca by placing your classified 
ad In more than 800 suburban 
newspspers, like this one for 
only $895. One phone call, 
one Invoice, one low payment 
is all it takes. Call the Subur- 
ban Classified Advertising Net- 
work fax-on-demand service 
800-356-2061 or 312-644- 
6610 X4731 to speak with 
sales coordinator. _^ 

CAN YOU MAKE AN 
EXTRA $2000+ PER 

MONTH PART-TIME AT 
HOME? Absolutely. Join a 
group that has done as well or 
better and has grown at a rate 
of 35% per month, (847) 726- 
1687. ' ' 

FREE INTERNET OPPOR- 
TUNITIES! Get paid for time! 
Advertise nationwidel Email 
NetSurfing4U@aol.com for in- 
formation. (SCA Network). 

GARDEN GIFTS 
You can earn $20-$40 

an hour as an 
Independent Consultant 
with Wlldflowors Garden 
Party, Inc., a new Home 

Party Company. 

Sell beautifully designed, 

hard-to-flnd garden 

products. 

Year-round catalogs. 

Fun and rewarding! 

Call (847) 949-7375. 

INTERNATIONAL COMPANY 

JUST STARTED DOING 

BUSINESS IN INDIA 

Wanted: bilingual speaking. 

For information call phone K 

for appl. 847-872-3580 

Email: herba!gar@spry- 

nel.com 



MAKE MONEY 
SURFING THE WEB 

I will tell you how for free 

e-mail me: 
klemmy2@mlndspfing.com. 



228 



Situations Wanted 



ELDERLY CARE L.P.N. 
looking for live-In position. Ex- 
cellent references. (847) 
872-2791. 




ISLAND .. .LAKE. CARE 
GIVER HAS full and part-time 
openings,, large fenced In yard 
and playroom, lunch and 
snacks, CPR/First Aide train- 
Ing. (B47) 487-7921. 

ISLAND LAKE MOM 

WITH Byrs. child care experi- 
ence has full-time openings. 
Fun actMlles, story time, field 
trips. Breakfast, lunch and 
snacks Included. Reasonable 
rates, (847) 487-^074, 

RESPONSIBLE AND 

VERY PATIENT PERSON 
NEEDED to cars for 8 children. 
After school hours and all day. 
Please call Dennis (847f 845- 
4030,(847)740-4021. 




250 



School/lnstniciJon 



PIANO LESSONS ' 

IN MY LAKE VILLA HOME 

OPENINGS 

Now for students 

6yrs. to adult. 

Over 2Syrs. experience. 

REASONABLE RATES. 

(847) 356-2780. 



301 


Antiques 



ANTIQUE DINING SUITE. 

William and Mary style dining- 
room suite, C-1920, In very 
good condition, table .with pull 
out leaves, 2-head chairs with 
arms, 6 -si do chairs and buffet, 
professionally appraised at 
54,150 asking $3300. (847) 
'548-0739. 



304 



Appliances 



KIRBY GENERATION 3 
VACUUM, $200. (262) 
862-6501. 



SEARS COMPACT DRYER, 
110 VOLT. ALMOND. 
20X24X32. 
S125/BEST OFFER. 
847-438-0886 



310 


Ba/xuVC rafts 



CONSTRUCTION EQUIP- 
MENT 1990 Case 580K 
backhoe, 1978 GMC 10 yard 
dump. 1978 International 10 
yard dump. 1986 Chevy utility 
body truck. 1989 Ford utility 
body truck. 1980 GMC 1 ton 
pickup. (847) 546-1474. 



318 



Business 
Office Kuuipment 



320 



Electronics 
Computers 



CHILD CARE NEEOED tor 
2yr. old boy, in my Wauconda 
home, Monday & Friday, flexi- 
ble hours. (847) 467-0205. 



CHILD CARE NEEDED in 

my home or yours, 10:30am* 
5:30pm, Monday-Tuesday- 
Thursday- Friday. Wednesday 
8:30am-5 :30pm. 1-preschoo- 
er, 2-schoot aged. Wauconda. 
(847)487-2101. 



CHILD CARE PROVIDED 
tN MY GRAYSLAKE AREA 
HOME, part-time. Monday, 
Wednesday, Friday, meals, 
good rates. (847) 223-5201 



330 



Garage 
Kuninuipc Sale 



338 


Horses & Tacks. 



16YR. GRADE TENN. 
WALKER MARE, -15,1H, -red 
bay, great looks, good gait. 
"Used as brood mare. Intmed. 
rider req. $l,200/best. (847) 
356- 3098 after 6pm. 

HAY AND STRAW Large 
and small square bales. High 
quality, good size. Delivery 
available (815) 653-6386. 

SADDLE SHOP HORSE 
trailers, Western/English, 
new/used. Buy, sell, trade. The 
Corral, Sullivan,- Wisconsin. 
(414) 593-8048. 



COPIER MINOLTA, UKE 

new, only 1500 copies made, 
autofeed/sorter. New $8,000, 
asking $1,975. (847) 
488-1373. 



777 SLOT MACHINE 777 
full size slot machine, $425. 
Two to choose from with war- 
ranty. (847) 548-1084. 

FOR SALE TEST equip- 
ment: electronic parts, diodes, 
chips, tamps, fuses. (847) 
526-7760 after 5pm. 

GET PAID 

TO SURF THE WEB! 

If you ever surf the web, then 

why not got paid for it? I just 

received my first check 

You can too. 

It's 100% FREE. 

Check it out) 

Just go to: 

www.alfadvantage.com. 

When you sign up use the 

reference code DXX-947. 



KUHLMANN DRAFTING 
MACHINE AND TABLE, 
$450. Lexmark printer copy 
scanner and fax. $350. Xerox 
copy machine #5310, $350. 
(847) 526-7255. 



MOVING SALE 
UVINGROOM, bedroom, di- 
nlngroom furniture. Every- 
thing must go. 

(847) 573-0190 
leave message. 

AFTER YOU'VE HAD 
YOUR BIG SALE, and there 
is still things that just did not 
go.... Call us at LAKELAND 
Newspapers and run it 
under the "FREE or Givea- 
ways" classified column. FREE 
ADS are NO CHARGEI 
(847) 223-8161, ext. 140. 



340 



Household Goods 
Furniture 



ANTIQUE POCKET BIL- 
LIARD TABLE (Brunswick Ar- 
cade), 4-1/2ft.x9fi„ 1-1/2in. 
slate top, $9.5007besl reason- 
able offer. (847) 662-0943. 

ATTENTION QU1LTERSI 
FEATHERWEIGHT, . with 
case and attachments. Pris- 
tine. (B47) 263-6995, (847) 
587-4910. 

COUCH AND ROCKER RE- 
CLINER White couch with 
flower pattern, rust recliner, 
S3O0/both. (262) 652-9977. 

DESIGNER MODEL 

HOMES FURNITURE 

CLEARANCE! 

Sofa/Joveseat set, 
hunter green, S4 95. 
Sofa, white, $350. 

Sofa/loveseat, 

earth tones, S595. 

Also: Plaids, Florals, 

Leathers and More. 

Diningroom sets, 10-piece: 

Cherry, $1,395, 

Mahogany, 52,395, 

Oak $1,695. 

Other sets available. 

Also: Bedroom Sets, 

from $995. 

(847)329-4119. 

www.modelhomefumiture.com 

DINING AND DINETTE 
SETS, assorted desks and as- 
sorted fight fixtures, grandfa- 
ther clock, armolres and as- 
sorted couches with love- 
seals. By owner. (847) 
438-6997. 

ELEVEN PIECE THOMAS- 
VILLE DININGROOM SET, 
great shape, . $l.075/best. 
(847) 599-9069. 

ELEVEN PIECE WALNUT 
DININGROOM SET, mint con- 
dition. 2-arm chairs, 
S1,050/best. (815) 759-0835. 

EVERYTHING MUST GO. 
TVsA/CR's/Satellrte dish/cord- 
less phones/small kitchen ap- 
pliances. Livingroom/bed- 
room/dinlngroom sets. Mat- 
tresses/area rugs. Office furni- 
ture/computers and more. For 
more info/directions call (847) 
336-2312. 

OPEN HOUSE SALE Loads 
of furniture and electronics. 
Electric dryer and queen futon. 
Great bargains. Saturday, 2/5, 
301 -D Dauntless Circle. Glen- 
view NAS. III. (847) 998-6231. 



348 


Lawn/Garden 



HONDA SNOWBLOWER 
MODEL HS624, Track Drive 
6hp, like new, 5yrs. old, $825. 
Call (647) 223-3836 

SNOWTHROWER9H.P., 
TRACK DRIVE, electric start, 
Cub Cadet, like new $600. 
847-615-8140 



349 


Clothing 



WEDDING DRESS 

DESIGNER GOWN SIZE 6. 

FOREVER YOURS, 

NEVER WORN 

$700 OR BEST. 

PAID $1,200. 

815-675-6354 



350 



Miscellaneous 



350 



Miscellaneous 



CARS $100, $500 Police 
impounds, Hondas, • Toyotas, 
Chevys, Jeeps and Sport Utili- 
ties. CALL NOW 1 -800-730- 
7772 exL 3050. (SCA Net- 
work). .. " 

DELL COMPUTERS „. Fac- 
tory direct . $0 down Low 
monthly payments, Pentium 
111-600 available, resolved 
credit problems OKI Call by 
Feb. 4 for freo printer. OMC 
800-477-9016 Code KN05 

MOTIVATIONAL CAS- 
SETTES, excellent condition. 
Over .$500 value. Best offer. 
(847)516-3425. 

SAWMILL $3795. SAWS 
logs into boards, planks, 
beams large caplcity. Best 
sawmill values anywhere. 
Free information . Norwood 
Sawmills 252 Sonwil Drive 
BuffulO NY. 14225 1-800- 
578-1363 

THREE IN ONE AUTOMAT- 
, IC "WEN*. SOTTERING IRON, 
in case, $7. New riveting gun, 
moderT75. $10. (847) 566- 
0990. .. 

WEIGHTLOSS BREAK- 

THRUI MAKE money!! Lose 
weightl Day/night formula. 
Guaranteed results. Call now 
1-800-449-4649 ext. 1015 
(SCA Network). 



"KISS YOUR CABLE GOOD- 
BYE* Only $69 includes 18" 
dish system. 40 channels; 
$19.98 /Mo. Toll-tree 1-888- 
4836. Won't be undersold I 
Money-back guarantee. 
FEDEX Oeliveryl • 

1B* DIRECTTV SATEL- 
LITE SYSTEMS. Single 
$69.00. Two box systems 
$199.00. 3 months free pro- 
gramming. Free Install kit with 
purchase, Authorized dealer. 
Open 7 days. t-800-325-7836 
000111. (SCA Network). 

CABLE DESCRAMBLERS 
UNBEATABLE PRICES! 
Converlers-Filtors-Video Sta- 
bilizers One Year Warranty 30 
Day Money back guarantee 
arrow. www i arrowtek,com 
1-800-554-2776 (SCA Net- 
work). 



354 



Medical Equip 
Supplies 



DIABETIC? DID YOU know 
that Medicare pays for diabe- 
tic testing supplies whether on 
Insulin or not? Call today for 
free info. Satisfaction guar- 
anteed. 1-800-843-7038 (SCA 
Network). 



358 



Musical 
Instruments 



TKO 4-piece drum set with 
cymbals, seat, $300/besL In- 
struments best for 8-12yr. old. 
(847)263-1646. 

WANTED DRUMS, GUI- 
TARS, Mandolins, Ukuleles. 
Bass Guitars. Pre 1975. Cash 
Paid. Ryan (262) 652-9967 
Kenosha, Wise. 



360 



Pets & Supplies 



AKC POMERANIAN PUP 
PIES, ready now,- vet ap- 
proved, 1st. shots, parents on 
premises. (847) 548-9044. 

AMERICAN PIT BULL 
PUPPIES, 5-females, 3- 
males, brindles, blacks and 
tans, family raised, parents on 
premises, 5250/ea. (847) 
973-8722. 

BASENJI PUPS AKC Bark- 
less, odorless, red and white, 
black and while. Available 
1/29. (815) 476-7B37. 

CFA PERSIANS 1 -TOR- 
DIE, $275, female 8/weeks. 1- ' 
black male 7/months, $200. 
(847) 223-2514. 

BRITTANY SPANIELS, 
males, AKC, 10/weeks old, 
tails cropped, dewctaws re- 
moved, first shots started, de- 
wormed, $200/each. 
(647)395-2660. 

DOG SITTING 

IN MY HOME. 

State licensed. 

Reasonable Rates. 

Call Florence (847) 966-6319. 

FISH TANK-LARGE WITH 
one Fish Oscar $50.00 Good 
condition. 815-337-8652. 

LABRADOR PUPS AKC, 
chocolate and black, dew 
claws removed, $350-$400. 
(262) 694-3355. 

ROTTWEILER PUPPIES 
AKC, all female, 9/weoks old. 
good with kids, excellent Ger- 
man bloodlines, $350. (262) 
652-4279. _^ 

SIBERIAN HUSKY PUP- 
PIES, 3-males, AKC, blue ' 
eyes, beautiful markings, first 
& second shots, wormed, 
S350. (847) 263-1253. 

SUGAR GLIDERS RE- 
QUIRES commitment, seri- 
ous inquiries only. (262) 
697-0258. 

TWO GERBILLS COM- 
PLETE with colorful plastic 
cage, all accessories and 
food, $60. (847) 263-1646. 



368 



Tools & 

Machinery 



LINCOLN 200AMP DC pro- 
pane, powered arc welder, 
new batteries, new cable (port- 
able), $850. (847) 540-0264. 

PLASMA CUTTER NU- 
TECH System, 230 volt. 
S1.200 value, hardly used, 
S900/best. (847) 838-6997. 



C18 / Lakeland Newspapers 



CLASSIFIED 



8 






370 



Wanted To Buy 



CAMERA'S 
DON'T self al 
Top prices paid 
Canon, Alpa, 
Zeiss, Contax, 
con, Minolta, 
Olympus, etc. 
LECTIBLES 1 
(SCA Network). 



WANTED! 

garage sale. 

. Leica, Nikon, 

Voightlander, 

Pentax, Top- 

Hasselblad, 

RITZ COL- 

800-956-9132 



Slot Machines WANTED- 
ANY CONDITION- or 
Parts. Also JUKE BOXES, 
MUSIC BOXES, Nickelo- 
deon and Coke Machines. 
Paying CASHI Call 
(630)985-2742. 

WANTED TO BUY 1-10 
acres near IIIAVisc. border, to 
build storage building. Ask for 
Jared (414)862-2517. 

WANTED TO BUY LIFE 
CYCLE USED EXERCISE 
BIKE, reasonable price. (847) 
662-6162. 



500 



Homes For Sale 



SO DOWNI HOMES NO 
CREDIT NEEDEDI 1-5 bed- 
room, homes, condos guaran- 
tee approved. 1-800-337- 
B1B1 X2019 (SCA Network). 



I *FORECLOSED 
HOMES * 

»» *■ » ■ * **»■» ** MM* * 

LOW OR SO DOWN 
Gov't & Bank Repos 

being sold now! 

Financing available! 

Local listings. 

1-800-501-1777, 

ext. 9203 



. 



500 



Homes For Sale 



2800 SO.FT+ IN GRAYS- 
LAKE 4-bedroom, 2.5 bath; 2- 
slory (oyer; vaulted ceilings; 
open kitchen/familyroom; ex- 
ercise room with skylights; 
S21 9.900. Call Joyce/John 
Freese REMAX SHOWCASE 
(847)360-3311 ext. 218. 

65TH ST. 516, 2 unit, 2-bed- 

rooms each, with dinlngroom. 
No Realtors. 599,500. (414) 
657-5801. 

RACINE G-ROOM HOME 
FOR SALE, 2-bedrooms, liv- 
ingroom, diningroom, bath- 
room, enclosed porch, fenced- 
in yard, $54,000. (262) 
634-2048. 

ANT10CH 4-BEDROOM, 2- 

1/2 bath, 2400sq.ft., 2-car ga- 
rage, 5209,000. (B47) 
838-2320. 

ANTIOCH TOWNSHIP 
RENT with option. Owner Fi- 
nancing. Executive ranch. 2- 
1/2 acres with pond, 4-bed- 
rooms, 2-1/2 baths, full base- 
ment, C/A, 2 wall-to-wall fire- 
places, large 2-car attached 
garage, hardwood lloors, 7 
minutes to Anlioch Schools, 
shopping and Metra. 
i S2,500/month, references, 
credit and S5.000 security de- 
posit, S298.000, 518,000 
down, finance balance, 3-5yr. 
balloon 8-3/4%, 20yr. ameriza- 
tion. Available 2/14. (847) 
740-9557. ■ 

BEACH PARK, CAPE COD 

STYLE HOUSE, for sale by 
owner. Please call (847) 596- 
2041 or (262) 697-8413. 

BEAUTIFUL HOME IN 
ADAMS, WISCONSIN, 4-bed- 
room, 2-bath, 1 level, easy ac- 
cess. Family, daycare or 
group home. 1-acre enclosed 
lot. 585,000. (608) 764-1550. 

BEST VALUE IN LAKE 
COUNTY. Round Lake Park 
contemporary, 2-story, 4-bed- 
room. 2.5 baths, 2400sq.ft. 
Must see. Full finished base- 
ment, billiardroom, glass block 
wet bar. Basement adds 
another 1,000sq.ft. 7yrs. 
young. $175,000. For Sale By 
»l Owner. (847) 740-4067. 

BURLINGTON TOWN- 

HOUSE 2-UNITS at 

1,850sq.ft. each. 3-bedrooms, 
2.5 baths, 2-car attached ga- 
rages, private wooded rear 
**, yard, will sell one or both. 
S112,000/ea. ' (414) 
763-6365, 

DIAMOND LAKE LAKE- 
FRONT 4-bedroom, 2.5 balh 
home, Many special features. 
Four season recreation, Price 
reduced $369,900, (847) 
566-7768. 



Attn: Classified 

Advertisers 

Deadlines for ads 

i are 10:00 a.m. 

every Wednesday 

Morning. 



DREAMS DO COME 
TRUEL House For Sale By 
Owner. 9210 393rd. Ave,, 
Powers Lake, Knolls, Wiscon- 
sin. Newer raised ranch on 
wooded corner lot. Beautifully 
landscaped. 3-bedrooms, 2- 
full baths (1 with whirlpool 
tub), famllyroom with oak man- 
tle fireplace, laundryroom, 
large eat-In kitchen with all ap- 
pliances, high efficiency fur- 
nace with central air, 200amp 
service, 2-car garage, 
I2ft.x12ft. deck off kitchen, 
concrete drive next to house 
for RV/boat. Plus 16x32 patio 
behind house. 10x14 barn 
shed enclosing 4ft. cyclone 
fenced yard. All this for only 
$160,000. No Brokers Please. 
Call Ray at (414) 279-5397. 

ELK GROVE BY OWNER 5- 
bedrooms, 2-1/2 baths, living- 
room, dinlngroom, familyroom 

. with fireplace. 5259,900. (847) 

-524-2730. 

FOR SALE BY OWNER, Oak 
Valley Estates, Spring Grove. 
Beautiful custom built 7yr. old 
home, 4-bedrooms, 2-1/2 
baths, full basement. A house 
you must see to appreciate, all 
the quality features. Asking 
S249,000. For more details 
call (815) 938-9008. 

FOR SALE BY OWNER 2- 
bedroom, 1-1/4 bath ranch 
with 2-car attached garage, lo- 
cated on 4 acres with 
3,000+pole barn, on Old 
Greenbay Rd. in Pleasant 
Prarle, Wisconsin. Easy ac- 
cess to 1-94 & Hwy. 31. Asking 
$215,000. (414) 694-0232 
alter 5pm. 

FOR SALE BY OWNER 
MCHENRY Beautiful 2-story 
home, 4-bedrooms, 2.5 baths, 
3 -car garage on 1-1/2 acres. 
Cathedral ceilings, master su- 
ite, cedar decks, C/A, large 
gourmet kitchen. Many more 
upgrades, too much to list. A 
MUST SEE. Near Chain of 
Lakes and Rt. 1 2 for easy com- 
muting. (615)365-8468. 

RICHMOND FOUR BED- 
ROOM RANCH, 2-full baths, 
1-1/4 acres, ' must see. 
$195,900. All newly remo- 
deled. (815) 675-6282. 

FOX LAKE 2-STORY, 3- 

bedrooms, 2-balhs, 2-1/2 ga- 
rage, workroom, lake access, 
$129,900. Extra lot available. 
(847) 587-0925. 

GAGES LAKE 3-BED- 
ROOMS, remodeled bath, no 
garage, no basement, newer 
roof, newer siding, lake rights, 
asking $110,000. (847) 
548-6573. 



Gov"t Foreclosures 
Sale 

Waukogan, Zion.Round Lako, 

McHonry & other areas. 

From $52,000 & up! 

Low down/make offer! 

Western Realty 

1-630-495-6100 



GREAT GET AWAY IN 
CRIVITZ, WISCONSIN, 7 
acres on the Posligo River 
with 2-homes. Main house is 
a fully furnished, fully function- 
ing log home. 3-bedrooms, 1- 
bath, livlngroom/diningroom, 
kitchen, enclosed porch that 
faces the river. Guest house 
has 2-bedrooms, with living- 
room. Both homes run olf gen- 
erator in garage and propane 
(no electricity), but has phone 
service. Interested buyers 
only S142.900, (847) 
356-8363. 

GURNEE 2-STORY ALL 
brick and stucco, 2-car at- 
tached garage, 5-bedrooms, 
4-baths, familyroom, formal di- 
ningroom, oak staircase and 
trim, 2 masonry fireplaces, 
laundryroom, full basement. 
Very attractive home in nice lo- 
cation, $335,000. (847) 
623-2870. 

GURNEE Adorable 1/2 aero 
wooded, mature perennials, 
tow taxes, 3-bedrooms, 2- 
balhs, 2-1/2 detached garage, 
$174,750. (847) 244-3422. 

HOME FOR SALE On beau- 
tiful double lot, in West Milt- 
more neighborhood. 3-bed- 
room, 1 -newly remodeled 
bath, hardwood floors, de- 
tached 2.5-car garage, on 
quiet no thru street. $127,000. 
For more details call (647) 
356-0377, House shown by 
appointment only. 



HOME FORECLOSURES 
NO MONEY DOWNf NO 
CREDIT NEEDEDI TAKEO- 
VER VERY LOW PAYMENTS. 
1-800-355-0024 ext. 8593. 
(SCA Network). 



500 



Homes For Sale 



500 



Homes For Sale 



500 



Homes For Sale 



HOMES FROM $5,000 

Foreclosed and repossessed. 

No or low down payment. 

Credit trouble O.K. , 

For current listings ca!! 

1-800-311-5048 

X6107. 

HOUSE FOR SALE BY 
OWNER 2-bodroom, ceramic 
tile bath, livlngroom, kitchen, 
enclosed roar room, hot water 
heat, California closet inserts 
in large closets, heated and 
A/C 2-1/2 car garage, almost 
2/3 acre, shed In back. Allow- 
ance for interior decorating. 
Fold down stairs leading to 
attic storage. West Anlioch, 
Low taxes. MUST SELL! 
$99.000/best. (414) 
862-9662. 

JOHNSBURG 3-BED- 

ROOM RANCH, 1-bath. full 
finished walk-out basement, 
deck, wooded neighborhood, 
$118,900.(847)497-9523. 

KENOSHA, WISC. 

RANCH, 3-bedrooms. 1-1/2 
baths, partially finished base- 
ment with workshop, fenced 
backyard, 1-1/2 detached ga- 
rage with attached shed, 
$109,500. (414) 942-1423. 



LAKE & MCHENRY & 
COOK CO, Free list of 
FHA/VA/Bank Foreclosures! 
Low down payments. Coldwell 
Banker (847) 222-6661. Se 
Habto Espanol. 

LAKE VILLA 3-BED- 
ROOM, 2-bath quad level on 
2-lols, 2-car garage, C/A, fire- 
place, above ground pool, 
room olf deck with hot tub, lak- 
erights to Chain. Located on 
Rt. 59. One year home warran- 
ty Included. $164,900, (847) 
356-8363, 

LAKELANO IS OPEN 

24 HOURS 

If you need to place an ad In 

Classified, call us at 

(847)223-8161 ext. 140 

and leave a message. 

We will get back to you by the 

next business day. Or you can 

fax our 24-hour fax line at 

(847) 223-2691. 

LAKEVIEW ON DOUBLE 

LOT in Paddock Lake, Wise. 
Enjoy privacy in this 1600sq.ft. , 
house surrounded by dead 
end streets and seasonal 
neighbors. 3-large bedrooms, 
1-1/2 baths and a fireplace! 
Roofs and 2 stage furnace are 
3yrs. new. Motivated sellers, 
priced to go fast. Call Cindy for 
appointment (847) 650-3452 
or (847) 740-0007. 

LARGE CUSTOM BUILT 2- 
story home on 1 -wooded acre 
with rights to Duck Lako and 
private park. 6-bedrooms, 3- 
1/2 baths, 2-fircplaces, fully 
finished walk-out basement, 
huge master suito and bath, 3- 
car garage. Overlooks horse 
farm in Oaks of the Hollow in 
Fox Lako, near Rt. 12 & 134, 
For Sale By Owner and shown 
by appointment only, 
5385,000. (847) 973-0456. 

LINDENHURST FOR 

SALE BY OWNER, raised 
ranch, 4-bedrooms, 2-fult 
baths, 2-1/2 car detached 
HEATED garage, enough 
room for 2-cars and a boat, 
oak floors, crown molding, 
large deck, C/A. B.J. Hooper 
School/Grayslake High 

School. SI 59,900. Shown by 
appointment (847) 356-3546. 



LINDENHURST IMMACU- 
LATE 2-BEDROOM ranch. 

with C/A, full finished base- 
ment featuring; 3rd. bedroom, 
laundryroom. workshop and 
large familyroom. Lots of stor- 
age. Custom deck, mature 
trees and landscaping. (847) 
356-0109. 

LINDENHURST LAKE- 
FRONT PROPERTY NEW 
CONSTRUCTION CUS- 
TOM BUILT HOME 4-bed- 
room, full basemenl, format 
living and dinlngroom, family- 
room with lireplace, large 
kitchen with island, master 
suite features whirlpool tub 
and cathedral ceiling, 2-story 
foyer, hardwood lloors, 9lt. 
ceilings, close to forest pre- 
serve, $329,000. (847) 
356-0962. 

LOVELY 4-BEDROOM 

TRI-LEVEL, 1-bath. kitchen, 
has newer wood cabinets and 
lloors, Includes refrigerator, 
stove and dishwasher. Newly 
painted. Finished lower level. 
Laundryroom Includes washer 
and dryer, central air, Round 
Lake Beach. Asking $105,000. 
417 W. Beachvlew. (847) 
546-7627. 



MUNDELEIN FOR SALE 
BY OWNER, 214 N. Green- 
view Dr., maintenance free 3- 
bedroom, 1-1/2 balh ranch, 
fenced yard back to park, 2- 
car garage, central air, cus- 
tom blinds and newer wind- 
ows throughout, $136,900. 
Call for appointment (847) 
566-6927. 

NEAR GURNEE, ILLINOIS 
BY OWNER Immaculate 4- 
bedroom, 2.5 balh, lolt, base- 
ment, bar, fireplace, C/A, 
deck, fenced roar. $198,000. 
$12,000 below market. (847) 
816-3798. Realtor gets in July. 
Possible owner financing. 

NEW CONDO, 1ST floor, 2 
bedrooms, 2 baths, 1 car ga- 
rage, patio, fireplace, ap- 
pliances, Round Lake 
Beach, $105,000. 
847-546-4705 ,__ 

OAKWOOD KNOLLS ANTI- 
OCH Great starter home for a 
young family, 3-bedroom 
ranch in .established, quiet 
neighborhood of Antioch, 1- 
1/4 bath, screened-in porch, a 
nice sized kitchen, new wood 
floor, and a beautiful wood 
stove all make for a nice cozy 
feel. The 2*1/2 car detached 
garage, fenced backyard and 
a full basement give this home 
lots of room tor you to grow 
into. Walk to beach at Cross 
Lake with playground and 
swimming, lots of kids at play 
in this neighborhood, great 
family atmosphere. Priced for 
quick sale @ $137,500 this 
one won't last long... (847) 
838-3510. 

ON THE BOULEVARD 
Great Neighborhood 7816 
20lh Ave., Kenosha, Wise. 2- 
bedrooms, possible 3-bed- 
room ranch, livingroom, fami- 
lyroom, large eat-in kitchen, 1- 
3/4 bath, 1*1/2 car garage, 
large fenced In yard, 
$105,900. (414)658-2301. 

PELL LAKE, WISCONSIN 

Only 5 minutes to Illinois bor- 
der, beautifully landscaped. 
1, 500sq.lt., 3-bedroom, ■ 1*1/2 
bath, raised rach, in very quiet 
neighborhood of newer 
homes. 6/yr. old home 
features a hobbyists 26x32 
dream garage; fully heated, 
dry walled and insulated, city 
water and sewer all connect- 
ed, price reduced to $129,900. 
Motivated. (414) 279-5986. 

LAKE VILLA PRESTEGI- 
OUS CHESNEY SHORES 

1800sq.li. ranch with large 
room sizes. 3-bedrooms, 2-full 
baths (updated), L-shaped 
greatroom. familyroom with 
Lannon Stone fireplace, C/A, 
new roof, 2-patios, beautiful 
lake view with water rights to 
Chain, low taxes, definitely not 
a drive-by. S1 59.000. Call for 
appointment (847) 356-3910. 

PREVIEW INSIDE OF MANY 

HOMES IN NORTHERN 

LAKE 

COUNTY IN THE COMFORT 

OF YOUR HOME GO TO: 

http://JOYCEFREESE. 

REALTOR.COM 



504 



ROUND LAKE 3-BED- 
ROOM. 1 full bath, newly re- 
modeled and now carpeling, 
$98,000. (847) 546-9980. 



SALEM BY OWNER Very 
spacious 3-bedroom, 1,5 
bath, 1,275sq.ft., 2*car ga- 
rage, recently remodeled, lak- 
erlghts. Call for appointment. 
$140,000.(262)343-1854. 



SOUTHS1DE 3-BEDROOM 
RANCH, with recroom in 
basemenl, newer carpeting In 
livingroom. hardwood floors In 
bedrooms, oversized garage. 
Many extras. (414) 694-5896 
for appointment. . 

SPRING GROVE FARM- 
HOUSE Charming 2-story on 
2.4 acres, 3-4 bedrooms, 2- 
baths, newly remodeled kitch- 
en and balh, flagstone fire- 
place. Must see. $215,000. 
(815)675-9016. 



SPRING GROVE HAVE 

kids or like to entertain? No 
problem In this 4-bedroom, 3- 
bull bath home on 1 acre, 3* 
car garage, roomy eat-in kitch- 
en, diningroom, large living- 
room, familyroom with brick 
fireplace. Backyard Includes 
cedar shed, 3-seasons gazo- 
bo with electric, large dock, 
large pallo and wood swing 
sol. Asking $228,000. (815) 
675-1604. 



SPRING GROVE METICU- 
LOUS stone cedar custom 
built home. 4-bedrooms, 4- 
baths, on 1.5 wooded acres, 
3, 300sq.lt., walk-out base- 
ment, open loft overlooking 
greatroom with stone flre- 
'place, 2-whirlpool baths, wrap 
around deck, 3.5 car garage, 
upgrades galore. By owner 
$339,000. (815) 675-3800. 

SPRING GROVE WATER- 
FRONT, nice 1 -bedroom cot- 
tage with fireplace, also large 
fenced-in backyard, plus boat 
dock, owner llnanclng, 
$89,900. 10% down, 
S750/month. (847) 497-3256, 
(847) 98B-2078. ' 

SUBMIT YOUR LAKE- 
LAND CLASSIFIED ADS 
ON THE INTERNET! Visit 
http://www.lpnews.com/ lo 
place your ads conveniently. 
Ads appear on the Internet, In 
all Lakeland Papers, The 
Great Lakes Bulletin and The 
Market Journal for only 519.75 
for 15 words, then 15c each 
additional word. 

THREE BEDROOM 
BRICK RANCH with attached 
garage, 2-1/2 baths, sunroom, 
fireplace, finished basement, 
ceramic/hardwood floors. Ke- 
nosha's most beautiful home 
in 1997. $185,000. Must see. 
(262) 605-8875. 

WAUKEGAN THREE BED- 
ROOMS, 2-1/2 baths, 2-car 
attached garage, park like lot, 
1 acre, 2800sq.ft„ $193,000. 
(847)623-3105. 

THREE-FOUR BEDROOM 
HOUSE, large fenced yard, 
Grayslake area Schools. (847) 
231-5166. 

TWIN LAKES, WISCON- 
SIN cedar and brick 3-bed- 
room ranch home, livingroom, 
diningroom, kitchen, family- 
room, den, 1.75 baths, full 
English basement, huge 2- 
tiered deck, 3-car garage, 1.3 
wooded acres with thousands 
in professional landscaping, 
immaculate inside and out. 
Highly rated Randall Grade 
School. For appointment call 
(262) 877-9620. 

VA/HUD REPOS! 

Now lists weekly. 

Call Ryan & Co., Rooltora 

"Your Repo Specialists." 

(847) 526-0300. 

VINTAGE BEAUTY, 
GREAT Waukegan neighbor- 
hood, 3-bedrooms, hardwood 
floors and trim, fireplace, cen- 
tral air. 51 34.900. (847) 
662-5942. 

WAUCONDA FOR SALE by 
owner, 4-bedroom, 2-1/2 bath. 
Call for Info, Days (847) 296- 
0302, evenings (647) 
526-4522. ask for Mike. 

WAUKEGAN 4-BED- 
ROOM, 3.5 bath. 2.5 car at- 
tached garage. 3,000sq.ft., on 
dead end street, fireplace, 
cathedral coilings, must see, 
$245,000. Call Larry (847) 
249-5245. 

WONDER LAKE RAISED 

ranch, 3-bodrooms, 2-balhs. 
C/A, fenced yard, 2.5 car ga- 
rage, quiet street. $119,000. 
(800) 244-7920 ext. 213. 

WOODSTOCK JUST 

MOVE In. Just off historic 
square, 2-bedroom, new roof, 
windows, carpet, paint, deck, 
hot water heater, Close to eve- 
rything. $89,900. Call Kevin 
(815) 337-9044. 



ROUND LAKE 

BEACH $90s 

6 rim, 3 bdrms, 

new kit/bath!! 

Hj. lot. New HT/CA. 

Must sell! 

GATEWAY REALTY 

CALL MARY 
C773D 77S-444© 






mm 



In search of that 
perfect employee? 



We help you find the per* 
fect porsor^C«|Mpday'(0 
got^oti^. te^wantod, ;• i 
..•seasonal opportunity/ 
medical opportunity or./ 
job fair od In the next' 
Lakeland paper,''' 

847-223-3200 

/ 




Homes For Renl 



AVAILABLE NOW OLD 
Mill Crook (Mlllburn) Very 
roomy 4-bedroom, 2-balh, Nv- 
Ingroom, dinlngroom! sitting- 
room, and mudroom. Refer- 
ences, credit check and de- 
posit required, Sl,100/monlh, 
tenant pay utilities. Call Cathy 
(847) 244-5330. 

COTTAGE FOR RENT 

Gentlemen's quarters. Com- 
pletely furnished. Non-smoker. 
No pets. Security deposit. 
$650/monlh. (847) 223-0729. 

DOWNTOWN GRAYSLAKE, 
1 -bedroom, $565/month, 
2-bedroom with Jacuzzi, 

S765/month, 

3-bcdroom, $875/monlh. 

ROOMS FOR RENT 

S90/weekly. 

(847) 367-1360, 

pager (847) 335-4800 

Vouchers and Certificates 

accepted. 

INGLESIDE 2-BEDROOM 
LOG home, 2-1/2 baths, full 
basement, 3-car garage, 
$1,450/month plus security 
deposit. Owner Is Licensed 
Realtor. Call Cheryl (847) 395- 
7900 OKI. 136. 

PISTAKEE BAY 
SMALL 2 bedroom with 
basement on lake. 
Appliances & carpeling 
$650per month plus security. 
Leave message 
647*381*9444 ' 

RENT TO OWN Great 
Grayslake location, 3-bed- 
room ranch, fenced yard, 2.5 
garage, S1 ,250/month * plus 
option fee, (847) 548-1495. 

WAUKEGAN 2-BED- 
ROOM, 1-BATH, new ap- 
pliances, completely remo- 
deled, $800/month plus utili- 
ties and security. (647) 
247-9081. 

WILLIAMS BAY, WISCON- 
SIN, SMALL 3-bedroom. 5 

minutes to lake, furnished or 
unfurnished, private country 
setting. S500-S525. (847) 
498-1418. 



514 



Condo 
Town Homes 



CONDO FOR SALE Vaca* 
lion Village. Fox Lake, 1 -bed- 
room Clipper, pool, marina, 
security gale, $39,000/besl. 
(847)587-1109. 

KENOSHA LIKE NEW 
CONDO, 2-bedrooms, 2- 
balhs, many upgrades, 1 -car 
garage, $89,900. (262) 
697-8413. 

LIBERTYVILLE 
FOR RENT 

2 bedroom condo close to 
downtown shopping & Metra, 

SB85./mo. No pets. 
847-360-8842 

RENTAL-TOWNHOME 
GURNEE, BEAUTIFUL 3- 
privals bedrooms, 2-full bath- 
rooms, eat-in kitchen, Irving/di- 
ningroom with cathedral ceil- 
ings and fireplace, 1-car ga- 
rage. Gas heat, 5 minutes 
from tollway, train, shopping. 
Immediate. $1,500/monlh. 
Jayne Jones/Jan White 
REMAX SHOWCASE (847) 
360-3311 oxt.399&301. 

ROUND LAKE BEACH 2- 

bedfoom townhouso For 
Renl. Maintenance free, C/A. 
fireplace, deck, pool, garage. 
Available Immediately. 

SBOO/rnonlh, (847) 223-2253. 

TOWNHOME 3 BEDROOM, 
2.5 bath finished lower level, 
2 car garage, oak trim 
throughout, central air, cathe- 
dral ceiling on upper level. 
Asking $165,000, Golf 
course community/Wads- 
worth. For more Informa- 
tion/appointment for viewing. 
847-782-1105 

WAUKEGAN 2-BED- 

ROOM, 3-LEVEL condo. 
fully finished basement, Cen- 
tral air/heating, $82,500. (847) 
625-5280. 



518 




BURLINGTON, WI-14X72' 

trailer home w/14x20' addi- 
tion on large lot. 3 spacious 
bedrooms, kitchen w/break- 
fast bar, large livingroom, 
separate area for washer/dry- 
er. Plenty of closet space, 
large attached deck & 2 stor- 
age sheds. Wheatland 
Schools. $20,000. 262- 
537-2357 

MOBILE 1990 CARROLL- 
TON, double wide, Kenosha, 
newly carpeted, air, 3-bed- 
rooms, 2-baths, natural lire- 
place, deck, shed, $35,900. 
(262) 552-7666. 



MOBILE HOME 12X48, 
newly decorated, stored In Elk- 
horn, Wise- . , Must • sell. 
53,750/best. (708) 453-5946, 

MOBILE HOME 3-BED- 
ROOMS, 2-baths, fireplace, 
all appliances, new rod, 
549,500. (847) 662-2052, 
(847)761-5224. 

MOBILE HOME 3-BED- 
ROOM, new furnace, central 
air, large kitchen, large living- 
room, large shed. A Must see, 
$14,500. (262)942-4111. 

NEW 2-BEDROOM, 1- 
BATH MOBILE HOME AVAIL- 
ABLE, Prico Includes; refrig- 
erator, stove, set-up and 
more. $33,900 (plus tax). Im- 
mediate occupancy. Shown by 
appointment. (847) 566-6690. 
Financing available. Diamond 
Lake Mobile Home Park. 

OAKDALE ESTATES 

HWY. KR & I-94, Kenosha. 
1986 North American, 16x80, 
2-bedrooms, central air. shed, 
deck, all appliances included, 
attractive lot, $32,900. (414)' 

679-0079. 

PATHFINDER 12X60, 2- 
BEDROOM, 1-bath. larger 
livingroom, and 10x8 utility 
shed, all appliances Included, 
$6,500/best. (262) 597-9543, 
pagor (262) 494-2124, 

ROUND LAKE DOUBLE 
wide, 3-bedrooms, 2-baths, 
livingroom. diningroom, fami- 
lyroom, low property taxes, 
1st. 6/months lot rental free, 
$30,000. (847) 265-8068. 



SHORECREST 


POINT 2- 


BEDROOM, 


14x70. 


510,000/best. . 


(414) 


654-8818. 





THREE BEDROOM MO- 
BILE HOME, new deck and 
appliances, $21,000. (262) 
763-5143. 

THREE BEDROOM TRAIL- 
ER, newly remodeled, nice 
lot. big shed, pool. Close to 
town and train. In Timber 
Creek Mobile Park between 
Rls. 134 and 120, 
$10.000/besl. Rich or Cathy 
(262)877-8621. 

UNION GROVE 1972 RollO- 
homo 14x70 with a 12x16 ad- 
dition. 3-bedrooms, covered 
deck, 2 sheds. Includes ap- 
pliances. Asking $27,000/best. 
(414) 878-2726. 

WANTED TO BUY EXPAN- 
DO 2-BEDROOM MOBILE 
HOME, in area, reasonable 
price. (847)662-5 162. 

WAUCONDA IN TOWN 

WALK TO EVERYTHING 

Located In an over 

55 community. 

NEWLY DECORATED 

1990 1 -bedroom, 

1-1/2 bath, with carport 

and shed. $39,900. 

1990 1 -bedroom, 

1-1/2 bath, with carport, 

and shed, $29,900. 

1995 2-bodroom, 

2-balh, with garage, 

carport and shed, $56,900, 

(847) 526-5000 

leave message. 




A DETAILED 1, 2 & 3 bed- 
room apartments and also stu- 
dio in a well mlntained brick, 
refin. mahogany, solid plaster, 
3 closets, dining, air, laundry, 
parking, Hard to find quality at 
$535. (847) 910-1389. 

CLEAN 1-BEDROOM, 

2ND floor apartment. In 
Round Lake. $495/month plus 
security deposit. Available 
January 1st. (847) 546-8730. 

FOX LAKE 1-BEDROOM 

on waterfront. Storage unit, 
pool, tennis, biking, marina. 
Ideal lor couple. S575/month 
plus electric. (847) 587-5301. 

FOX LAKE 

VACATION VILLAGE, 

LARGE STUDIO 

APARTMENT, 

BEAUTIFUL 

SURROUNDINGS, 

SECURITY ENTRANCE, 

S470/MONTH 

PLUS UTILITIES. 

NO PETS. 
(847)223-1131. 

FOX LAKE WATERFRONT 

and Rt. 12. Deluxe 1 -bedroom 
apartment unit, $625/month, 
(708) 788-5564. 

GURNEE LARGE 2-BED- 
ROOM, 1-1/2 baths, dish- 
washer, rango, refrigerator, 
A/C, laundry, storage. Exer- 
cise room, cablo, security, In- 
tercom systom. Individual ga- 
rage. No pets. $825/month. 
(847) 336-1072. 



I 



•!•-•«-— »-■ 









February 4, 2000 



CK - ,._>-, - - 



CLASSIFIED 




Lakeland Newspapers I CI 9 



520 



■Apartment For 
Rent 



520 



Apartment For 
"Rent 



GURNEE/WAUKEGAN 

NORTH SHORE 

APARTMENTS 

At Affordable Prices. 

Spacious, 

Luxury Living. 

Elevators. 

On Site Staff. 

Good Location. 

Easy to Toll Roads. 

. IMPERIAL TOWER/MANOR. 

(847) 244-9222. 

KENOSHA, Wl., 5237-41 
Ave. 1SR side- by-side du- 
plex. Appliances included, 1 
car attached garage, 
lawn/snow removal. Full 
bsmt. No pets. Month to 
month. S625/mo. Call 262- 
694-9777 until 5:30pmi 262- 
694-0061 or 262-694-2494. 

ANTIOCH LAKEFRONT. 
NEW 1 -bedroom, furnished 
apartment, Includes utilities, 
plus your own washer/dryer, 
private area. Available March 
1st. S650/monlh. (847) 
B3B-05Q3. 

LAKEVIEW . TERRACE 
APARTMENTS LAKE VIL- 
LA, Large 1 & 2 bedrooms, 
$645-S760/monlh. Heal, wa- 
ter, air included, (847) 
356-5474. 

NORTHBROOK SALEM 

WALK 2 bedroom, 3rd floor, 
balcony, large living 
room/dining room. $845 In- 
cluding water/heat. Laundry 
in building. Sublet 3/1/00. 
847-298-4287 

PLEASANT PRAIRIE/NO 
DEPOSIT SHORT TERM 
LEASE, 2 BDRM, HEATEO 
GARAGE. 950/MO. (262) 
942-6028. .__ 

ROUND LAKE PARK 
CLEAN 2-bedroom. second 
floor apartment, security de- 
posit, 1st. months rent. No 
pets. Non-smoker preferred. 
Available immediately. 

S575/month. (847) 740-3179. 



STOP -RENTINGI1 OWN for 
less. $0 Down. No credit need- 
ed. Guaranteed approval. 1- 
800-360-4620 ext. a 203 (SCA 
Network). 

WACONDA 3-BEDROOM 
APARTMENT, Large rooms, 
first floor, Stove, refrigerator, 
washer and dryer. Available 
Immediately. $900/month. 

(847) 361-3846. ' 

WAUCONDA 1-BEDROOM 
APARTMENT, heal. and hot 
water Included, S565/month 
plus security deposit and 
lease. No pets. References. 
Available Immediately. (847). 
433-0891. 

WAUCONDA IN TOWN 

WALK TO EVERYTHING 

Cozy Studio apartment 

Includes all utilities. 

Available February 1st. 

No pets. 

5570/monlh plus security. 

(847)526-5000 

~ leave message. 

WAUKEGAN NORTH 2- 
FLAT, large 2-bedroom up- 
per, sunny and bright, 
$690/month. (847) 336-4952 



ZION 1-BEDROOM, EAST 
SIDE, first floor unit with front 
porch, $445/month plus elec- 
tric and gas, no pets. (647) 
831-5388. 



ZION . 3-BEDROOM, EAST 
SIDE, heal paid, new kitchen 
cabinets, no pels. S745/month 
plus electric. (647) 831-5388. 



Lilac Apartments 

3Ulac 

Fox Lake, IL 

1 and 2 bedroom 

available March 1st. 

Senior housing 

847-587-8830 



Lakewood Village Apartments 



In Island Lake and Gray slake 

Offering affordable housing for qualified applicants. 
Now accepting applications for our: 



• .1,2 and 3 bedroom apartments 
• Wheel-chair accessible, I bedroom 



Please call for more information or appointment ac 
(847) 223-6644 
TDD# (800) 526-0844 f$J 

» 4 Meridian Group, Inc. 



xsxsst 



£ T>*eama T>a Com© Titiel ^ft* 

% A Place To Call Horned 



•vV 



• 1 & 2 BOKM ST/VXXJS flOOH I1ANS 

v-* ^f • O.v-Ste-24-i ojr ihwat-xy man 

-^ r^' ■ SATTLUTE TV NOW AVAJLAfUi 

£* • Laundkv facilities 

• CONVtNLVT TO MORA 

• BrAi/iiruu.Y wwicured grounds 

FlXXIULT LEASING 






HAJi 



Kill 

o«| 



445 Donin Dr. 

Antioch, IL 
(647) 395-0949 



* .* 



Deep I «*« I Vr ntiiKjn 

149 N.Milwaukee Ave 

Lake Villa. IL 

(847) 356-2002 



^gisaaggas^gagg^ 



OAKRIDGE VILLAGE 
APARTMENTS 




528 



ApUUomes 
To Share 



528 



,\pl/lltnne$ 
To Share 



UTILITIES PAIDI1 
Roommates Wanted. 

Newer home, 

clean, nice rooms. 

Good location. 

Call Mason (847) 746-2577. 

H. Mason Enterprises, Inc. 



FOX LAKE TOWNHOME, 2- 
bodrooms, 1-1/2 baths, wash- 
er/dryer, pool, tennis, laker- 
Ights, on Mlneola Bay, 
$425/month, all utilities Includ- 
ed. Must be responsible. (847) 
973-9590. 



528 



Api/llomes 
To Share 



WANTED RESPONSIBLE 
PERSON to share 3-bedroom 
house In McHenry, 
$400/monlh +" 1/2 utilities. 
Non-smoking. (615) 

759-9204. 



530 



Rooms For Rent 



ROOMS FOR RENT 
S95 a week 
.Full house privileges. 
Chain of Lakes area. 
847-322-0323 

TWO ROOMS AVAILABLE 

FOR RENT 

In largo Lake Villa home, 

off Rt. 59 & 132, 

fully furnished, 

$375-$400/month. 

1-B0O-255-4659 

ext. 4689, 
(647) 973-0128, 
(414) 689-2012. 



Vj$ Slop in at: 7/ A 

|A 25*9 Oakridgc Court in Antioch #j^ 

£l| Or call: lp 

g# f^» 847-395-4840 VJ 

A S=! 1-800-5Z6-0844TDD ,§\ 



GAGES LAKE HOME near 
CLC. $425/month. All utilities 
included except phone. Must 
be responsible. Ages 18-30. 
(847)543-0639. 



SEEKING RESPONSIBLE 

INDIVIDUAL to share 2-bed- 
room home In Winthrop Har- 
bor. $500/monlh plus security. 
Includes all utilities except 
phone. References required. If 
Interested call(B47) 731-3860. 



534 



Business Property 
For Salts 



IDEAL BUSINESS LOCA- 
TION Heart of downtown Mu- 
ndelein. Formerly an op- 
tometrists office for 20yrs., 
currently used as Real Estate 
Appraisal office. Approximate- 
ly 9O0sq.fi. house with full un- 
finished basement, very high 
visibility location,- 50x1 50ft. 
site, plentiful convenient on 
site parking. House has new 
roof, new Insulated windows, 
new furnace, new C/A/C, 
newly fenced backyard, 1-car 
detached garage. .6 miles to 
Metra. $149,900. (847) 
949-5327. 



CAPE CARTERET, NC. 
Waterfront Bed & Break- 
fast. 7 guest rms, suites 
w/innkeepers qrts on- 
site. $1.3 Mil. 

Emerald Islo Realty 
800-304-4060. 



SUNNY S. FL- 

FT LAUDERDALE. 

Prime 110% loc. Las 

Olas. comer SE 8th Av. 

3500sf retail. Long lease 

avail. William or Fred. 
. 954-467-6060. 



MISSOURI 02ARKS- 
For Sale by Owner, 

Florist/Gifts/ 
Antiques. Bldg, in- 
ventory w/2-3 

rentals. 
573-226-5516. 



ST. AUGUSTINE, FL 
(downtown loc) - Ice 
Cream/Yogurt Store. For 
Sale by Owner. Est'd 
I5yrs. Exc loc, exc re- 
turns. Owner retiring. Long 
term lease. Ask'g $125K. 
904-824-4225 aft 12 noon, 



538 



Business Property 
For Rent 



FOX LAKE - 

NEW 

LAKE VIEW 

OFFICES 

ON GRAND AVENUE. 

HANDICAP ACCESSIBLE. 

(647) 587-1615. 

FOX LAKE RT. 12 Excellent 
visibility, now, i200sq.it., of- 
fice/retail. (708) 788-5564 
leave message, 

GRAYSLAKE DOWN- 
TOWN l5Q0sq.fi. Center 
Street Storefront. Also 
765sq.ft., downtown store/of- 
fice for rent. 1200sq.ft. shop 
space for rent. Call for details, 
(847) 604-3295'. 

INDUSTRIAL/WAR- 
EHOUSE SPACE WITH ol- 
fice. (262) 643-3705- 



ISLAND LAKE COMMER- 
CIAL SPACE in prime loca- 
tion, 400sq.ft, on main floor, 
400sq.lt. on lower level, 
$695/month. (847) 526-5755 
days. (847) 526-8306 even- 
ings 



538 



Business Property 
For Rem 



568 



WAUCONDA 'RETAIL/OF- 
FICE SPACE, approximately 
BOOsq.ft., Main Street location, 
Bmple parking. Available 
2/1/00, S700/month. Call Bob 
Olsen (8471 526-5101. 



LANDSCAPE 
CONTRACTOR 

2400 Sq. Ft. Pole Bam 

plus acreage 

for growing product 

In 
Richmond. 
Negotiable. 

"Land 
Management 

815-678-4334 



540 



Investment 
Property 



SIX APARTMENT UNITS 
All brick with garages, North 
side Waukegan, good cash 
flow. No contracts. (847) 
662-3241. 



560 



Vacant Lot 
Acreage 



564 



ResortA'acation 
Rentals 



CAMPGROUND MEMBER- 
SHIP COAST-TO-COAST 

Travel America Resort Parks 
International (RPI), home 
park, sparkling springs, near 
Rockford. 111. $800, seller will • 
pay transfer fees. (414) 
694-5253. 



568 



Oui Of Area 
Property 



MUNDELEIN OFFICE 

SPACE Centrally located, 
600sq.ft„ easy access. Plenty 

of parking. Low utility bills, 
$600/month, (647) 680-9824. 



WAUCONDA IN TOWN 
LOCATED ON MAIN 
STREET 1200SQ.FT. 

BUSINESS WITH OFFICE, 
$795/month plus utilities. 
Available Immediately. (647) 
526-5000, leave mes- 
sage. 



ILLINOIS & INDIANA 
FARMS. 50+ to choose 
from. Country homes w/acre- 
age, Recreational proper- 
ties. Need your farm sold? 
Call me. Have buyers with 
specific needs, 
Richard Hanson- Broker, 
Rosenboom Realty 
615-363-4558 or 
933-9773; 
E-mail 
Rhansen972@aol .com 



Out of Area 
Property . 



BEAUTIFUL WOODED 

LOT1 ACRE ALL OAK, 
HICKORY. PINE & BIRCH 
TREES, 1 BLOCK FROM WA- 
TER. CHANNEL LAKES. 
MUST SEE. 847 395 4134 
AFTER 5PM. 

BUILD TO SUITI TREVOR, 
WISCONSIN 1/2 acre parcel, 
private well on sewer. (414) 
862-2197. ' 

BURLINGTON, WISCON- 
SIN, 10-1/2 wooded acres In 
developed subdivision, 

S89.900. (847) 746-8996. 
. Custom house blue prints 
available.. 

DAVIS, ILLINOIS CORN- 
ER oversized (113x197) lake- 
view lot in Lake Summerset. 
Boating, fishing, pool, parks. 
Low taxes. $32,000. (773) 
622-2276. 

FIVE-NINE ACRE HOME- 
SITES, near Wilmot, Wiscon- 
sin from $89,000." Some wood- 
ed and walk-outs. Horses/pole 
buildings OK. Owner will 
finance, $2,000 down @ 6%. 
(815)678^228. 

HALF ACRE LOT FOR 
SALE Private cul-de-sac, 
city sower, well wator, 2 
mllos North of Antioch on 
Rt. 83. Call for Info. Must 
bob. (815) 344-8683. 

LOOKING FOR A LOT7 1 
acre lot, Spring Grove. $2,000 
down, no Interest or payments 
for 18 months or will discount 
for cash. Call owner (815) 
676-4228. 

POPLAR GROVE, ILLI- 
NOIS Double lot on North 
Main Street. Residential. 
S45,000/negotlable. (815) 
765-2133. 

UNIQUE FARMETTE 

HEARTLAND Township 

Countryside Two residences 
on 9.4 + acres, horse bam with 
4 1st. class stalls and drive- In 
hay loft, fenced arena and 
turnout, new 3 stall garage + 2 
drive-In sheds. Farm house 
modernized, 3-bedroom, 1- 
bath, basement, high eff. heat, 
farm size kitchen, laundry, 
deck. Second house, 1 -bed- 
room, LR dinette, oak kitchen, 
utilityroom, large deck, zoned 
A2, immediate occupancy. 
More acreage available. Miles 
of vistas across open fields 
and Kishwaukee stream, 
S285.0O0. (815) 943-9892 or 
(608) 723-2795. 



KEWANEE, IL-For Sale by 
Owner. Country hm on 
main fiwy. 3BR/2BA, 
whrlpl. remod In/out, 2 acs 
& fruit trees. S 138,500 obo. 
309-521-521.8300/ 
309-854-0001. 



ARIZONA ANCALA 

Million S Viewstl Golf course too! 
Bfcathiaking city, mountain & goll 
course views from Wis gorgeous 
hornet Flngstone ihruoul. 3305 
SF. 4BD + OFF, 3BA. Awesome 
terraced bachybrd, rock water fea 
lure slide Into pool, spa, firepl 
S746K. Rlly Execs, Grade, 602 
550-5073 or 460-946.9450 



ATTENTION 

CLASSIFIED 

ADUEATISEAS 

If you haue placed classified 
aduertlslng milh the Lake- 
land Newspapers you may 
receive a misleading state- 
ment from another firm re- 
questing payment for mis 
aduertlslng. To recelue 
prop- 
er credit to your account, 
all payments for your Lake- 
land Newspapers 
aduertlslng 
must be made as Invoiced 
and directed to: 
Lakeland Newspapers 
po Boh 268 
3B S. Whitney St. 



574 



Real Estate 
Wanted 



LOOKING FOR RENT. 

Need 3-rooms In a quiet place,' 
for quiet business. Not expen- 
sive. Only In Antioch. (847) 
838-1536 after 4pm. 



704 



Recreational 
Vehicles 



1982 24FT. KAYOT PON- 
TOON BOAT, includes chairs 
and 0/8 motor. S4,500. (847) 

395-8637. 

1998 ROCKWOOD 25FT. 
TRAILER, easy tow, triple 
bunks, sleeps 6-7, loaded ex- 
tras, .".never used, $10,000. 
(647) 390-0717. . 

LAYTON 1993 TRAVEL 
TRAILER 26ft., front bedroom, 
rear bunk, sleeps 8, full bath, 
awning, A/C, hitch included. ' 

$6,900. (847) 249-0166. 

MOTORHOME 1995 

PACE Arrow, 33ft., Chev 454, 
under 20K miles, fully loaded, 
sleeps 4, includes car caddy 
and hitch, $84,500. (847) 
623-4874. 



SOUTHWIND 1985, 27FT. 
Class. A MH, fully self-con- 
tained, very, clean, 
S11,800/best. (847) 
882-3837. 



708 



Snowmobiles 
AWs 



710 


Boat/Moiors/Etc. 



720 



Sports Equipmenl 



PAINTBALLGUN . 
Spyder semi-auto palntball 
gun with 20 oz. C02 tank for 
250 ball reserve, face mask 
auto view loader, 100 paint- 
balls, will not separate, $450. 

847-526-5044 

After 7pm . ■ ■ 

PHEASANT HUNTING 

NEW club in Marengo area. 
Coon Creek Cacklers. (815) 
332-4728, Roger. 



TRANSPORTATION 



1996 POLARIS XCR 600, 
good condition, many extras, 
ready to ride, $3,000. 
(647)395-7306 

POLARIS 1987 INDY 600 
FOR SALE 

POLARIS STORM 1996, 

low milkes, excellent condi- 
tion, many extras, with 2-place 
trailer, $3,600. (262) 
877-6666. 

SNOWMOBILE 1996 SKI- 

DOO FORMULA 2583. 2500 
miles, excellent condition, ask- 
ing $3,200. (262) 859-1843. 

SNOWMOBILE 1999 SKI- 
DOO Grand Touring, loaded, 
80OCC, electric start, reverse, 
etc., only 250 miles, $7,900. 
(847) 778-3393. 

TWO 1998 INDY 440s 

with 1998 Kara van 

enclosed trailer, extras, 

8.500. 

262-763-5099 

YAMAHA EXCITER 340 
SNOWMOBILE 1985, low 
miles, very good condition, 
$800. (847) 395-7953. 



724 


Airplanes 



1946 LUSCHOMBE BA, 
65hp, with fabric wings, wood 
prop and skis. Recent paint 
and glass. Looks and flies 
great, $16,500.. (414) 
248-8702, 



804 



Cars for Sale 



1991 YAMAHA SUPER JET 
(stand-up), like new, under 
50hrs. with Karavan Trailer. 
Wei suit. Must see. Must sell. 
51,600/best. Waterford area 
(414)514-2474. 

SELL OUT SALE Small Pro- 
pellers, ski vests, accessories. 
(815)385-4729. 



1979 TRANS AM, 10th anni- 
versary Silver Edition, all 
power, 403 engine, automat- 
ic transmission. $2, 500. 
1976 thru '89 

Trans Am parts & misc. call 
with needs. 847-458-1612 

1965 FORD CROWN VIC, 
LTD Wagon, excellent run- 
ning, 1,200. 

(847j 634-9088 

ACCURA 1988 LEGEND, 4- 
door, 128K, $2,400/best. 
(847) 566-9091 days, (847) 
516-2664 evenings. 

BMW 5251, 5-SPEED, 
black, leather interior,' power 
sunroof, 82K miles, excellent, 
$13,900. (262) 633-6771. 

BUICK 1992 ROADMAS- 
TER, $6,995. (647) 856-3000. 

CADILLAC, 1994 

DEVILLE, diamond white 
with gold detailing, fully load- 
ed, leather seats, sunroof and 
disc player, 69K miles. Ladies 
car, exceptionally clean, 
$13,000. (847) 395-3420. 

CHEVY 1981 CAMARO, re- 
built motor, new battery, some 
rust. (262) 652-3473. 

CHEVY 1989 2500 Silverado, 
loaded, 150K, roll top, Class 
4, controller, Jacobs,; very 
clean, strong runner $4,900 
or best. 
647-8B5-2544 

CHEVY- 1990 LUMtNA, all 
power equipped, clean in and 
out. no rust, 89K. Must see. 
(847) 973-8771 after 6pm. 

CHEVY 1991 BERETTA, 
86,000 miles, fair condition, 
but runs great. $2,900. 1989 
Yamaha Exciter snowmobile, 
good condition, $1,000. (847) 
740-2219, 

CHEVY 1991 CAVALIER, 
good shape, $2,000. (847) 
395-8258 after 5pm. 

CHEVY 1994 LUMINA $4995. 
847-395-3900 ' " 

CHEVY 1994 LUMINA EU- 
ROSPORT, $6,995. (847) 662- 
240O. 

CHEVY 1995 BERETTA, 

$6,995. (847) 623-3000. 

CHEVY 1995 CAMARO 
CONVT., $11,995. (847) 623- 
3000. 

CHEVY 1995 CAMARO, 
9,995. (847) 623-3000. 

CHEVY 1995 CAMARO, 

black, automatic, low miles, 
excellent condition, sharp car, 
$7.500/best. (847) 596-2620. 

CHEVY 199B METRO LSI, 
$8.995. (647) 662-2400. 

CHRYSLER 1996 SE- 
BRING CON V., $11,995. 
(847) 662-2400. 

CLASSIC QUARTER PANEL 
SALE. Mustang Camero, 
Nova, Chevelle, Cutlass, Mo- 
pars, Pontiac, Chevrolet, 
more! TRUCK PANS. 
FLOOR PANS. DOORS, 
FENDERS, BUMPERS. New 
and California rust free. 
MARKS COATINGS: 
CHROME, POWDER CE- 
RAMIC 217 824 6184 

DODGE 1994 INTREPID, 
$7.395. (847) 623-3000. 

DODQE 1994 SHADOW 

ES. S4.495. (847) 623-3000. 

DODGE 1995 NEON 
SPORT, $6,995. (847) 623- 
3000. 



DODGE 1995 STRATUS 
ES, excellent runner, fully 
loaded, new tires, $8,600. 
(262) 598-6910. 



804 



Cars For Sale 



DODGE '1997 NEON, 
$7,995. (647) 662-2400. 

DODGE 1998 NEON, 

S8.995. (647) 623-3000. ; 

DODGE 1998 STRATUS 4- 
door, black, air, power wind- 
ows and locks. Only $9,995. 
Call Trent (847) 856-3000. 

EAGLE TALON 1992, 

auto., sunroof, bra, very clean 
inside and out, $4,500. Call 
eves. (847)587-1737. 

FORD 1986 ESCORT EXP. 

5 -speed manual, high miles, 
good runner, no rust, 
$500/best. (262) 723-5976. , 

FORD 1987THUNDERBIRD 
2 Door, AM/FM cassette. 
Power windows, doors & seat 
Sunroof, red velour Interior. 
High performance tires, 
mag wheels & bra Included. 
847-367-4504 

FORD . 1991 TAURUS LX 
WAGON, $2,995. (647) 656- 
3000. 

FORD 1995 TAURUS $5995 
847-395-3900 

FORD 1996 ESCORT. LX, 

$6,995. (847) 623-3000. . 

GEO 1995 PRIZM $5995. 
847-395-3900 

GEO PRISM 1995, excel- 
lent condition, red sedan, LSI. 
5-speed, great starter/family 
car, $6.200/besl. 1996 
HONDA MAGNA 750. valve, 
excellent condition, very low 
miles, yellow/black, 

$S.5O07besL (847) 336-2312. 

HONDA 1992 CIVIC, 
$5,495. (647) 623-3000. 

HONDA 1995 ACCORD EX, 
V-6, immaculate, 1 owner, 
leather, sunroof, all power, 
new tires, asking $11,765. 
847-837-0585 

HONDA 1998 ACCORD 
EX. $17.995. (B47) 623-3000. 

HONDA PASSPORT 1997, 
and TOYOTA 1995. Power ■*■ 
everything, great condition, 
tike new, $18.000/besL Tercel, 
S5,000/best. (847) 99B-6231. ~ 

LAKELAND IS OPEN 

24 HOURS 

If you need to place an ad in 

Classified, call us at 

(847)223-8161 ext. 140 

and leave a message. 

We will get back to you by the 

next business day. Or you can 

tax our 24-hour fax line at 

(847)223-2691. 

LINCOLN 1989 TOWN 
CAR, S3.995. (847) 623-3000. 

LINCOLN 1994 CONTI- 
NENTAL, S6.995. (847) 662- 
2400. 



LOOKING FOR A 

GREAT USED 

VEHICLE7 

Try The Auto Market 

Place. - . 

It's got a great selection of 

Cars. SUVs, Trucks and 

Vans each week in The 

Lakeland Newspapers. 



MERCURY 1991 CAPRI 
CONV., $4,995. (847) 662- 
2400. 

MERCURY 1993 COU- 
GAR, black, leather interior, 
under 75.000 miles. 
$5,495/best. (847) 973-1489. 

MERCURY 1996 SABLE, 

S7.995. (847) 662-2400. 

NEED A CAR? 

NEED CREDIT? 

Call 888-24APPROVE 

Mr. Koye has placed more 

- people In need of credit In 

vehicles than anyone 

In the area! 

NISSAN 1993 ALT1MA 
GXE, automatic, A/C, cruise, 
am/tm cassette, ABS. 
$6.500/be5t. (847) 548-4812. 

OLDS 1996 CIERA 4-door, 
V6, 71,000 miles, nothing 
wrong, $7,000/best. (262) 
537-2779. 

OLOSMOBILE 96, 1984. A 
real looker) Champagne color, 
automatic everything, looks 
great inside and out. Excellent 
runner, mechanically sound. A 
real steal at $2,200. Call (262) 
654-6543 ask for Susan. 

PLYMOUTH 1991 AC- 
CLAIM, excellent runner, one: 
owner. Blue Book value whole- 
sale $2,500, retail $3,600. Sell 
for $2,599. (262)539-3614. 

PLYMOUTH 1992 LASER 
RX, 5-speed, sunrool, stereo 
cassette player, excellent con- 
dition, $4,200. (847) 
973-1147 leave message for 
John or Cindv. 



y>i 



C20 / Lakeland Newspapers 



CLASSIFIED 



February 4, 2000 



804 



C:ir.s For S;ile 



PLYMOUTH 1993 Grand 
Voyager LE, wht, power 
seals, windows, new battery, 
radiator, transmission, 91k, 
well maintained. $6,200. 
(847) 487-4658 

PONTIAC 1993 GRAND AM 
S5995. 847-395-3900 

PONTIAC 1996 GRAND 
AM GT, red, 2-door, lyr. fac- 
tory warranty, sunroof, 51,000 
miles, loaded, $9,500. (847) 
731-2548. 

PONTIAC 1997 SUNFIRE, 

33,000 miles, power windows, 
locks, brakes, steering, rem- 
ote and CD, very clean, 
$9,800. (847) 838-6009 even- 
ings, (647) 816-7000 days. 

PONTIAC 1999 GRAND 

AM SE, black, CD. air, sun- 
roof, only 4K miles. $13,995. 
Call Trent (847) 856-3000. 

AUTO AUCTION 

OPEN TO THE PUBLIC 

SALVATION ARMY 

Now Every Saturday 

9am. 

Over 100 to be sold 

weekly to the highest 

bidder. 

Opening bid $100. 

No reserve. 

Grand opening et our new 

location In Waukogan on 

Rte120, one block east of 

Greenbay Road. 

(847)562-0100 



SATURN 1997 SL $8495. 
847-395-3900 

SATURN SC 1999, 3-door, 
auto., air, 6K original 
miles, 512,995, (847) 856- 
3000. 

SEIZED CARS 

From $500 

Sport, luxury & economy cars, 

trucks, 4x4"s utility and more. 

For current listings call 

1-800-311-5048 

X9B32. 

SUBMIT YOUR LAKE- 
LAND CLASSIFIED ADS 
ON THE INTERNETI Visit 
http://www.lpnews.com/ to 
place your ads conveniently. 
Ads appear on the Internet, in 
all Lakeland Papers, The 
Great Lakes Bulletin and The 
Market Journal for only $19.75 
for 15 words, then 15c each 
additional word. 

Tired Car 

1984 Cavalier Wagon, good 

runner, S500 or best. 

847-546-053B 

TOYOTA 19B9 COROLLA 

141,000 miles, $1,000. (847) 
543-0096. 

TOYOTA 1993 CELICA 

GT, $5,99 5. (847) 662-2400. 

TOYOTA 1993 COROLLA, 

55,995. (847) 623-3000, 

VW JETTA GLS 1996. 

$13,195. (847) 623-3000. 



814 



Service & Parts 



FIBERGLASS CARGO 

COVER, FITS 

FULL SIZE/SHORTBED. 

$300 OR BEST OFFER. 

847-622-5009 

TIRES & RIMS 4 Mlchelln 
lires Pilot LTX-P285/60/R18 
and 4 Borbol wheels, brand 
new, paid $1,700, will sell for 
$1,000. (847)526-8505. 

WHEELS 4-ALUMINUM 

MAG wheels with tires for 
1987 Dodge Dakota, 
$250/bost. (262) 654-7857. 



824 



Vans 



ASTRO 1993 CARGO Van 
Excellent condition, low 
mileage, $4,500 or best offer. 
B47-740-3B1B 

CHEVY 1982 WORK VAN, 
6-cyllnder, automatic,, good 
shape, stereo, captain's 
chairs, $500. (847)487-2312. 

CHEVY 1994 CONVERSION 
V AN $8995. 847-395-3900 

CHEVY 1995 CONVERSION 
VAN $13,995. 847-856-3000. 

DODGE 1994 GRAND 
CARAVAN, $10,995. (847) 
662-2400. 

DODGE 1996 GRAND 

CARAVAN SE, 4-door, quad 
seats, roof rack, P/L, P/W, 
$9,000. (847) 223-4803, 

DODGE 1996 RAM CONV. 
VAN, $12.99B. (847) 623- 
3000. 



824 


Vans 



FORD 1979 BRONCO 

4WD, rebuilt engine, new 
trans., runs great, 

$3,000/best. (847) 231-4113 
after 5pm. 

FORD 1986 F-250 VAN, 

12 it. bed, hitch, ladder racks, 

$1,150/besl. (262) 643-4646. 

FORD 1995 WINDSTAR, 

$9.995, (847) 623-3000. 

FORD 1998 WINDSTAR, 

$13,995. (847) 662-2400. 

PLYMOUTH 1991 GRAND 
VOYAGER. 3.3 V6, all power, 
rear air, rebuilt trans., original 
owner, good condition, 
$2,395. (847) 265-7376. 

PLYMOUTH 1993 GRAND 
VOYAGER LE, full power, till, 
cruise, Infinltl AM/FM cas- 
sette, 3.3 V6, roof rack, 7-pas- 
senger, garage kept, well 
maintained with records, 
161 K, always starts. Asking 
$4,800/oro. Call Pete (847) 
265-9003-work, (847) 721- 
0100 V.M. 

PLYMOUTH 1996 VOYAG- 
ER, $9,495, (847) 623-3000. 



828 



lour Wliccl Drive 
Jeeps 



CHEVY 1991 S-10 BLAZ 
ER. 4WD, 4-door, loaded 
$7,500. (847) 540-8046. 



CHEVY 1992 BLAZER 4X4 
4-door, loaded, 114K, new 
tires/brakes, Looks/runs great 
$6.500/best. (847) 543-8016, 



CHEVY 1993 S-10 BLAZ 
ER, $8,995. (B47) 662-2400. 

CHEVY 1996 SUBURBAN LT 
4X4 523,495. 847-856-3000 

CHEVY 1998 RAM 1500, 
$17.995. (847) 623-3000. 

FORD 1987 EDDIE 
BAUER BRONCO II, 
148,000 miles. Asking 
S2,500/firm. Call (847) 740- 
0769. 

FORD 1989 BRONCO 
black 4x4, 5.0 V8, runs, looks 
great, many new parts. Great 
buy at $5,200. (847) 
573-8127. 

FORD 1992 EXPLORER, 

$6,995. (847) 652-2400, 

FORD 1997 EXPLORER 
4X4'S $15,995. 
B47-395-3900 

FORD 1997 EXPLORER 

EODIE BAUER. $19,995. 
(847) 623-3000. 

GMC 1997 JIMMY SLE 4X4 
$15.995.847-856-3000 

GO IN THE SNOW. 19B5 
Bronco II, 4WD, 5-speod, 
good condition, high miles, 
S2,000/best. (847) 546-6697. 

HONDA 1995 PASSPORT 
EX 4X4, $12,495. (847) 623- 
3000. 

JEEP 1986 CHEROKEE 5- 
speed, 15,000 miles on new 
2.8 motor, new brakes, discs. 
bearings, mufller, works good, 
$3,800/best. Ramon Acuna 
8am-7pm. (847) 249-0136. 

JEEP 1994 CHEROKEE 
Country 

4 Wheel Drive, very good 
condition, $8,200 or best off- 
er, 
847-680-7549 

JEEP 1995 WRANGLER 
■ 4X4, 59.495. (847) 623-3000. 

JEEP 1987 4X4 COM- 
ANCHE, sunroof, CD player, 
list of new parts. Runs perfect, 
needs body work, 

51,200/bosl, (262) 308-0340, 

NISSAN 1991 PATH- 
FINDER V6 4X4, $9,995. 
(B47) 623-3000. 

NISSAN 1993 PATH- 
FINDER, S1 1,995. (847) 662- 
2400. 

TOYOTA 1988 PICKUP, 
red. 4x4, 5-speed. A/C, cab, 
33K miles, like now, $7,900. 
(B47) 234-8919. 



834 


Trucks/Trailers 



1985 4X4 S-10 Utility truck 
with 6 ft; plow attached, 
$3,500 or best offer. (815) 
678-3027. 

CHEVY 1987 3/4 TON 2WD 
350, unbelievable buy, au- 
tomatic, excellent condition, 
$4,500 with cap and rack. 
(847) 662-5202. ' 

CHEVY 1996 S10 LS 
PICK UP $7,995. 
847-856-3000 

CHEVY 1997 S-10, $7,995. 

(647) 623-3000. 



834 



Trucks/Trailers 



DIVORCED 

Wife's lawyer says - 

"SELL IT - 

Hall Price of new $17,5001 

Chevy Tahoo 72,0Q0ml. 

414-491-3294 

DODGE 1991 DAKOTA, 

$4.495. (847) 623-3000. 

DODGE 1993 CARAVAN 
LE (short), loaded, looks 
great, runs great, well main- 
tained, lots of now parts: tires, 
brakes, struts, 93,000 miles. 
Asking $6,500. (262) 
537-4293. 

DODGE 1993 DAKOTA 
CLUB CAB LE, $6,995. (847) 
623-3000. 

DODGE 1994 RAM 3500 
DUALLY PICKUP regular cab, 
fully loaded, V10, Tonneau 
cover, excellent condition, 
61,000 miles, $16,500. (B47) 
263-6992, 

FORD 1987 TRUCK F-350, 

cab and chassis, 6.9 diesol, 
new fenders and doors. 
S4,000/best. (414) 677-9644. 

FORD 1995 F1 50 $9995. 
847-395-3900 

FORD 1996 RANGER EX- 
TENDED CAB. $9,995. (847) 
662-2400. 

FORD 1997 F150 $10,495. 

847-856-3000 

FORD RANGER 1994 XLT 
4WD manual, immaculate, 
70K, 5K/2yr. left lull warranty, 
step bars/push bar with 
fogs/cap bedliner, GV TR R15 
tires 15K. New Sony CD am/fm 
speakers CB radio/antenna, 
$B,995/besl. Craig 8am- 
10pm. (262) 770-9155. 

GMC 1992 SONOMA 
EXT.CAB4X4 $6,995. 
647-856-3000 

MY TRUCK IS A 1987 
CHEVY S-10, 4-wheel drive, 
130,000, blue, $2,200. (847) 
838-0759. 

PLYMOUTH 1996 GRAND 
VOYAGER SE $10,995. 
847-856-3000 



844 


Motorcycles 



S33 


Handyman 



THE HANDYMAN NO job 

too small. Painting, carpentry 
and repair work. Reasonable 
rates and free estimates. 
(847) 223-7724. 



S39 



Housekeeping 



S57 



Palming 
Dc-conning 



INTERIOR/EXTERIOR 
PAINTING. EXPERT wall re- 
pair. Home repairs. No job too 
small. Low pricing. (847) 
362-1964,(847)231-4721. 



S78 


Remodeling 



DC TILE WE Wo instsall ce- 
ramic, vinyl tile, Parquet, and 
Pergo floors. For free esti- 
mates call (847) 395-0777, 
pager (708) 988-8504. 

JACK'S 
REMODELING 

*Basemonl Finishing 

•Famllyrooms & Offlcerooms 

'Electrical & Plumbing 

'Kitchens & Baths 

•Vinyl Replacement Windows 

•Soffit Fascia. 

FREE ESTIMATES 

(847) 546-3759. 

peVP 




t 





Tike A Step Up Wm Limm 

LAKELAND HANDLES ALL TYPES OF NOTIFICATIONS 





Bid Notices • Assumed Business Names 

Reports of Condition • Financial Statements 

• Tax Levy Hearings • Lien Sales 

• Foreclosure Sales • Claim Notices 

Change of Address Notices • Zoning Variances 

• Tax Assessments • Adoption Notices 

Dissolution of Marriages • ...Many Others 



Lakeland Newspapers 



Phone:(847)223-8161.; 
Fax: (847) 223-8810 .fc^ 




1994 HD FATBOY, \ red, 

28,000 miles, excellent condi- 
tion, lots of chrome, Sampson 
Drag Pipes, Skulls galore, 
many extras, $15,500, (847) 
963-9408 Carl. 

HARLEY DAVIDSON 1970 
FLH ELECTRAGLIDE S&S 
Carb, shovel, extras, clean, 
S7,500/OBO. Call evenings 
(414) 694-7715. 



DEBBIE'S CLEANING 

SERVICEI 

19 Years Experience 

•Move ouls, 

•Senior Specials. 

Roasonablo Raios. 

References available. 

(847 ) 973-9913. 

POLISH CLEANING LADY 

will clean your house, apart- 
menl. Quality work at reason- 
able prices. (847) 680-3129. 







(IDe age).™ 

Enrolled Agents 

Certified Public Accoun tan ts 

IRS Representation 

Established Since 1960 

265 Center St • Grayslake 

(847) 223-0777 

CARL SAND 
ACCOUNTING & INCOME TAX 

E-File available 

Income Tax Preparation 

Small Business Accounting 

404 Lake St • Antioch 

(847) 395-7444 
«r 

COMPREHENSIVE 

ACCOUNTING SERVICE 

Free E-File wl pd. return 

564 N. Route 83 • Grayslake 

Daniel E. Coulon, EA 

Mary Carpenter, CPA 

(847) 223-4040 

COTE & WRIGHT 

Servicing Lake County for over 30 years 
31 S. Seymour, Ste. B • Grayslake 

(847) 231-4163 • fax (847) 231-4167 
1304 Washington St. • Waukegan 

(847) 662-6019 • fax (847) 662-6053 
E-mail: cotewright@aol.com 

DAM, SNELL & TAVEIRNE, LTD. 

Certified Public Accountants 

21 Rollins Rd. • Fox Lake 

(847) 587-3022 

1512Artaius Parkway • Libertyville 

(847) 367-4448 

4410 Rt. 1 76, Ste. 6 • Crystal Lake 

(815)356-9182 

Internet Address: dstcpa.com 




H&R BLOCK 

474B W. Liberty • Wauconda 

(847)526-8877 

2 W. Grand • Fox Lake 

(847)587-9333 

426 Lake • Antioch 

(847)395-6230 =.i<* 

629 W. Rollins • Round Lake 

(847)546-4862 

JACKSON HEWITT 

TAX SERVICE 

344 North Ave. icarm Norths, mo • Antioch 

(847)973-1099 

366 Virginia St. m.t4) • Crystal Lake 

(815)477-2905 

226 N. Barron Blvd. • Grayslake 

(847)548-6060 

1007 N. Front St. mi) • McHenry 

(815)363-1040 

622 Hawley St. • Mundelein 

(847)949-8433 

2435 Green Bay Road • North Chicago 

(847)689-1099 

23 W. Rollins Rd. • Round Lake Beach 

(847)740-1099 

336 S. Green Bay Road • Waukegan 

(847)360-1099 

2250 Sheridan Road • Zion 

(847)746-1099 

CALL 1-800-234-1040 

FOR OTHER LOCATIONS 

JERROLD J. WEINSTEIN, LTD. 

Income Tax Preparation 
(Electronic Filing Available) 
Small Business Accounting 

Payroll Service 

4949 Grand Ave. • Gurnee 

(847) 662-3420 



If you would like your company to be 

added to Lakeland's Tax Directory, 

please call 847-223-8161. 







[February 4, 2000. 



CLASSIFIED 

M. Jl» i ^hJi ii ill I in ■ . 



Lakeland Newspapers I 02. 1 



Lakeland 



.;,. ■ , ,. . , 




IS YOUR 



• M-.' ■■,. - 




To These Fine Lakeland Area Businesses 



To Place 
Your Ad Here 
Call 

847-223-8161 





CONTRACTORS ELECTRIC SERVICE, 

ELECTRICAL CONTRACTORS 
"Call Us For Fast Courteous Service' 

RESIDENTIAL-COMMERCIAL 

33265 N. Rto. 45 
Wildwood, IL 60030 



(847) 223-4682 




• ?. * • ■ ,■ i. * - 




Horizon Remodeling Inc. 



Full Service Remodeling 
Drywall 
_ Basement Finishing 

fe Garage. Finishing 

'■ . 

- Residential and ComrrterGlal. 



Insure^ 



f847l 8 38- 5949 



mmmmmMmm 



■liifliTiTfiiiiiiinrri ri'iT iiflnii 



- ! - ' n 



847/305,3454 

Payroll, spread 'sheets, 

genera) ledges; income 

'., taxes & computer inpul, , 

I . Call Kitrc-it Pal ;ka 

for an appoimmeiu ibday!- 






nMnf^Sprhujl 

Call. us, at 

LafeCandlAfe'Wspapers 

to advertise your 

Business Here. 

(847)223-8161 



^e;^ti;;i!it»ii!i!:Ht!'MHi;!!;»i 



msso 



y/lNTERNET CLASSIFIEDS 

DON'T BE LEFT BEHIND 

100 word/ 90 days/ $175 
Banner Ad./ 90 Days / $250 

Discounts to Start Y2K 
1222 30% 2000 Tan 15% Feb 10% 

TEGH MOLOCH/ 

847-7409061 

DISTINCT! VETEC®AOLCOM 



HoneIst John's 
Firewood . 



• F.C. $65 Delivered 

• Free estimates on Tree Work 
(847) 548-4993 



* 





H 



RECYCLE 

CASH For Alum. Cans 
Copper-Brass 
Insulated Wire 




Chicago Surplus 

1 1 304-260th Ave 
Trevor, Wise; 



One Mile West of 83 &C 
Turn North on 259th 



m 



Mon-Frt 9 -5 pm 
Sal 9-3 



, Closed 12-1 Lunch 

262-862-2517 lf ^ 



J\?o (^\me to mtmleanl 

You're always busy and cleaning Is a chore.... 

Let us tidy up foryout 

We offer cleaning:- 

•Weekly •Bf-Momlily •Monthly 

•Special Occasions & Relocations 

- Very Reasonable Rales - Licensed, Insured, & Bonded 

- FREE Estimates -References Available 

PRO-MAIDS 

Professional Cleaning Service 

^oKS*" (847)514-6855 




Residential and 
Small Commercial 



Painting 
Ex 




Personal Touch 

miIlmiIuiI ( It/iHiin'jVn iec 



A Detail Cleaning Evcrv Time 

77/ Put A Sparkle In Your Home, 

& A Smile On Your Face" 
All Supplies Included • 

(inleu spoaJ KJutietM mertedi 



-8428 s 



Yi*M MlUilv l>;i^i'il 'IwiMtU'S* 

Ill'M l>;i> n \<j\\ \\;lil;lhk'! 

( lilllcl \iMir ilnllk' I 5ii 

Nunc s |H*vi;ll Alk*nli»>|l! 



Ask for Desiree 546-0767 



DONT THROW AWAY 
THAT OLD LAMP, 
BRING IT TO OUR 
LAMP DOCTORS 
FOR REPAIRS. 

WARREN ELECTRIC INC. 

33261 H. HIGHWAY 45 

WILDWOOD, IL 60030 

(847) 223-8891 




HHHHHHHHHMHHHHHHHMMHHHH 



ALL AMERICAN | 
P CONST,'' 

Kitchen-Bath-Basement 
Painting/Custom Remodeling! 

Quality work .it ;ilford.ibk' prices i 

($500 off with this ad) | 
frfce Estimates 

847-548-5110— 




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I ir. RoihIciI 

K lllMU.tl 



HMMMi 




ROOF, SIDING AND WINDOW LEAK 
TROUBLESHOOTING AND REPAIR 

ROOF INSPECTIONS (NEW & RE-ROOF) 

h CUSTOM RE-ROOF SPECIFICATIONS 



^PHONE# 847-508-7148 
FAX # 847-587-6258 • 
E-MAIL: ResRoofCo@aol.com 



- KX* COMUH1MT* UtTTfUTT VK* 

• HaTOML KOO*«MI CtWnUCTOM UMC 

• kum omeuu 4 coot admmhutim* I 



ixnoa (nil ucrtrttD •oorwo 
covnucton 



To place your 
ad 



• 





A PRIVATE PARTY MERCHANDISE AD 



Name 



Address. 
Phone__ 
City; 



State. 



Zip. 



CLASSIFIED LISTINGS 



19.75 s 15 words or fewer, onu week, 15c each additional 

word. Ads will bo seen In all 11 Lakeland Newspapers, The 

Market Journal, Great Lakes Bulletin and on the Internet 



Please check one box below! 



DEADLINE: Wednesday 9:30 a.m. 
Please allow extra time for orders '- 
being sent through mail*. 
Payment must be received with order. 



a GARAGE SALES .330 

a LAWN & GARDEN 348 

Q HOUSEHOLD MERCHANDISE 340 

Q APPLIANCES .304 

□ MISC. MERCHANDISE 350 

a PETS v 360 

Q WANTEDTO BUY 370 

Q GIVEAWAY 120 

We'll help you get rid ot your 
unwanted treasures. Your ad will 
reach 200,000+. It works I Call 
(647) 223-0161 ext. 140 and ask 
for Lisa. The classified deadline is 
Wednesday at 9:30 a.m. 



Q BOATS & EQUIPMENT 710 

□ MOTORCYCLES 844 

□ CAMPERS & TRAVEL TRAILERS . . .704 

□ AUTOMOBILE LOAN & FINANCING .804 

.□ VANS & TRUCKS 834 

Q AUTOMOBILES WANTED 848 

Q AUTOMOBILES FOR SALE ...... ...804 



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Drop ad off in our office from 8:00 am-5:00 pm Monday-Friday 
at 30 S. Whitney, Grayslake, IL or fax to our 24 HOUR fax line at 847-223-2691 



* We are not responsible for ads received late that were sent through regular mail. 



C22 /Lakeland Newspapers 



CLASSIFIED 



February 4, 2000 



(ltitiq,ue 



Oyr&gfr 



lit \ Stone 



Main St. Richmond, IL, tins u fen' spaces left, Sell nil 

types of merchandise In ai successful store in a bright, 

clean setting. Don't delay! 

Find almost anything & everything. 

Decorate your home. Complete your collection. 

Shopper's Paradise! 

• Dealers Wanted 

Open Tucs.-Sun. 

815-678-7300 



^Ancunosa L/ln//(7ues 






WE BUY & SELL 



-Furniture -Clocks •Toys -Rugs 

•Jewelry -Glassware -Silver -Lamps 
•Paintings -Porcelain -Dolls 



$ERVBCES~risrC£D - D"Br 



• Estate Settlement 
•Auction Service 



•Clean-out Service 
■Appraisals 



(847) 356-OS32 



Open ( Datfy /0-J • Gfosecf Hftoncfays 

£7us/ Was/ of 5?/ 43 on 3?/ J 32 

3 shin. IfDcs/of 

^uinaa fTtOffs C&Caff 



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^^^f^v'ff^^^syn^T: 



nn lira-en* inonnniKiiu •, .-..vtiT^Xv; \ '..•■ luxuav 



*£S£& The Best C hine s e F ood 

In TJtc Area... 

And Our Customers 

Are Tlie Critics 



m 



^ 



-■:::: 



FREE Delivery Plenty of Free Parking 
call for details 
• Dine In • Carry Out • Cocktails 

The Chinese Restaurant That Everybody's Talking About 

Conveniently Located Across From Fairgrounds 

111 S. Hwy. 45 Grayslake 

(847) 548-8882 Fax:(847)548-2822 



W, 



Hapfy Now Year 




Banquets 



^JM7i-*£.!&Afj' 



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IN DOG TRAINING CORP. 

% OFF ANY 
SERVICE 

1 460 E. Belvidere RrJ., Grayslake, IL 
<847) 223-2822 ;| 

expir e s 3/3 1 /00 On e coupon p e r cus t omer 

EMH PQH BBm flBHB MR IVHM MBM HHH IBM 



»;.™WV:t./v 



W PRO PAC 



Premium Pet Food 

GRAYSLAKE FEED SALES 

PET, Farm, Lawn & Garden Store 

ALL MAJOR BRANDS OF PET FOOD ,Op 

Dog • Cat • Bird - Etc. iwi.ij.sti.tt-i'.rfirj-Hww rDtXr 

Center Street At Soo Line RR. Grayslake 

847.223.4855 (A \ 

Houti:MOB-MT:30joi-S;(»pni;Sill:OOm-llDOOO / M 




(Bonnie $rook 
Clubhouse 

2800 N. Lewis Ave. Waulccgun 

Make your wedding reception 
a truly exceptional event! 

847/3604732 

Madisoi\</lvenue 

'Mr N. Slicrldnii. Waiilccgaii 

Make it a wedding to remember 
with our Bridal package. 

847/662-6090 



Photographer 



Picture (perfect 

New Location 

40(5 Peterson Rd. • Libcrtyvillc 

Picture Perfect— 

Wliat wedding 

photography should be! 

847/247-9555 



... . 



■ n^-H^H.A-N.^^'.yriaj.i^ ; 



Beauty Salon 



Rentals 



J£bertymlle ( fient-tflll 

185 Peterson Rd. • Libcrtyvillc 

Everything for a party... 
except guests! 

847/362-7610 







(foolljjouse 
(Beauty Salon 

95 W. Grand Ave.* Suite 116 

LoltcMila . 
Wedding Party Specialists 
847/356-8394 




OF THE 








This week's "PET OFTHE WEEK" 

Is Black Jack. He is a 3 year old 

" English lab who arrived from England 

after a 20 hour plane trip to America. 

Submitted by: 

Maren & Savannah, Halnesville 

February, 2000 



»"■* 



Pals picked for Lakeland's Pet of the Week appear in- . 
most Issues of Lakeland Newspapers, The Great •' 
Lakes Bulletin, and The Market Journal? I 

Your pet may be next! 



send us your 

favorite photo 

and any 

information about 

the pet you would 

like to see 

mentioned .to 

Lakeland 

Publishers, 

Attn: Classified 

PET OFTHE 

WEEK, P.O. Box 

268, Grayslako, 

Illinois 60030. 

Sorry, photos 

cannot be 

returned. All 

information is 

subject to editing. 



i*tte 



9K 






s&jiSMS. NC 




Don't Wait for 
e Phone to 




lank' 






...with an ad in 
Lakeland Newspapers 

■■HMHw 

CLASSIFIED 



If you're advertising in the 
Yellow Pages and 

not With usi;.^ou're 

missing many business 

opportunities. 

;UnliKe the Yellow Pages 

your ad in bur 

?CLpSIRED 

Gives You All This... 

• You can change and update your 
ad weekly. 

• You can advertise your special 
seasonal rates. 

• Your ad can be seen every week by 
150,000 people. 

y. You can choose the format that tits 
your budget 

• You'll get great results! 

four ad will appear In all 1 1 Lakeland Newspapers 



CALL YOUR CLASSIFIED REPRESENTATIVE 
B -^ 1 -847-223-81 61 - - 



CTWWT - - '' -: ■ ■ ■,„ v r , ^ r B - V m ?! i - i - 



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February 4, 2000 



CLASSIFIED 



lakeland Newspapers I C23 








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1 * " j JWB Ct r^ 

&imZ&r*i ami 



'"•xwidi,! 



Let us save you a few clams. 



It"""'*"*. 















Employment Advertising 
Marketing Options 



COMBINATION RATIS 



aa-, — ?-£ttsr?- ...., - ~£S m bK** Wif3e fizz.',, 



giite 



Call for rates and information 



M pleat 

_] I juices, 



fTTjB 1 *! 




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" *1SfeSgraS?*=!?«^^S 



I LAKELAND NEWSPAPERS- 55,000 Serving Lake County by Subscription & Newsstand on Thursdays. 

MARKET JOURNAL- 85,000 Serving Lake County by Direct Mail on Tuesdays. 
1 GREAT LAKES BULLETIN- 23,000 Serving Great Lakes Area- by Free Newsstand on Fridays. 

Lakeland/Great Lakes Bulletin 
847-223-8161 
Market Journal 
847-223-3200 











^if^- r^ 






Rot 847-223-2691 



$2fi 



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r^"^. 







i*»J£—'r ■■"-""»"■:. -* "" W 



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for Intern^^p^iMTiat's Fast 
& ReliabJ^KlitfitEjfWIRECT" 



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FY3I 



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Chicago Bears Defensive Tackle 
And netDIRECT Subscriber, 



Chicagoland's 
Premier 

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./ . 



C24 / Lakeland Newspapers 



COUNTY 



February 4, 2000 





















Don't Have n 
Optical insurance? 

Call (262)697-5501 

Ask for Ursula. r 









E1//S/ON 



TM 





■ HYP P¥M11 ^; ! 

■ with Purchase Of A Complete Pair Of Glasses a ■ 

L 



We Will Match 
Any Other Contact 
Or Eyeglass Offers ' 




Some restrictions may apply. 
Expires on February 14, 2000. 



Yoii rriList have current of fer in hand at time of purchase. § 

' Product must be 100% Identical. Some restrictions ma/ apply: Not vWd 
LL I p L With any other offer. Expires on February 14, 2000.. ' LL Ti 



I 










B 






ILT^Ul 




$139.99 

ch resistant and ultra-violet included. 
|e vision. Lined bifocal - $20.00 extra 

Some restrictions may apply. Not valid with any other offer. Expires on February 14, 2000. 



I 
I 

1 

II 
II 
i 
i 



AIM EXTRA 









I 
I 
I 



ON MONDAYS, WEDNESDAYS & 

FRIDAYS AT THE PLEASANT 

PRAIRIE OR LAKEHURST 

STORES IN JANUARY & FEBRUARY 

I .„ „ . . . I 



mi. 



Appointment must be made In advance to Include eye exam and 

(complete purchase of a pair of regutarlv priced glasses. i'l 

Some restrictions may apply. \ I 

Not valid with any other offer. 
Expires on February 14, 2O00. I 




pearle mm ON.... 

WHERE FASHION AND VISION CARE COME TOGETHER 



LAKEHURST MALL 

LOCATION 

(847)473-4422 

WAUKEGAN 

Lower Level by Carsons- 



1805 N. RICHMOND ROAD 

McHENRY 

(815) 363-1700 



6641 W. GRAND AVE. 
GURNEE (847) 856-1200 
-In Front of Dominick's- 



•MEW LOCATIOU- 



Located just West ofHwy. C, on Hwy. 50 (75th Street) in the Prairie Ridge Shopping Centre 

9000 78th ST., PLiHSiliy? PRAIRIE 



Call Now For Your Appointment: (2SS) SS7ǤS@0 




Dr. Available 7 Days A Week 
One-Hour Service For Most Classes 



VISA 



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